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ANNUAL 
REPORT 



OF THE TOWN OF 

CHELMSFORD 




FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31 1034 



ANNUAL REPORT 

of the 

TOWN OF CHELMSFORD 




Receipts and Expenditures 



TOGETHER WITH THE 



School Report and State Audit 



Year Ending December 31 

1934 



BUTTERFIELD PRINTING CO., LOWELL, MASS. 



Report of State Audit 



September 8, 1934. 

To the Board of Selectmen : 

Mr. Frank J. Lupien, Chairman, 
Chelmsford, Massachusetts. 

Gentlemen : 

I submit herewith my report of an audit of the books and 
accounts of the Town of Chelmsford for the period from January 
1, 1933, to June 16, 1934, made in accordance with the provisions 
of Chapter 44 of the General Laws. This is in the form of a re- 
port made to me by Mr. Herman B. Dine, Assistant Director of 
Accounts. 

Very truly yours, 



Theodore N. Waddell, 

Director of Accounts. 



Mr. Theodore N. Waddell, 
Director of Accounts, 

Department of Corporations and Taxation, 
State House, Boston. 

Sir: 

in accordance with jour instructions, I have made an audit of the books 
and accounts of the Town of Chelmsford for the period from January 1, 
1933, to June 16, 1934, and submit the following report thereon: 

The books and accounts of the town accountant were examined and 
checked with the treasurer's books and with the records in the several de- 
partments collecting money for the town. 

The appropriations, as entered in the ledger, were checked to the town 
clerk's records of appropriations voted by the town. The ledger accounts 
were analyzed, the necessary adjusting entries were made, and a ba ance 
sheet was prepared showing the financial condition of the town as of June 
16, 1934. 

The books and accounts of the town treasurer were examined and 
checked. The recorded receipts were analyzed and compared with the re< - 
ords in the departments collecting money for the town and with the other 
sources from which money was paid into the town treasury, while the pay- 
ments were checked with the selectmen's warrants authorizing the disburse- 
ment of town funds. 

The payments of maturing debt, revenue loans, and interest were proved 
with the amounts falling due and with the cancelled securities on file. 

It is recommended that an appropriation be voted by the town for inter- 
est on town debt instead of leaving this item to be provided for by the 
assessors in determining the tax levy. 

The books and accounts of the tax collector were examined and 
checked. The taxes outstanding at the time of the previous examination 
were audited, and all subsequent commitments of taxes were reconciled with 
the assessors' warrants. The payments to the treasurer for the several lev- 
ies were compared with the treasurer's cash book, the abatements were checked 
with the assessors' records of abatements granted, and the outstanding ac- 
counts were listed and reconciled with the accounts as shown in the ac- 
countant's ledger. 

Verification notices were mailed to a number of persons whose names 
appeared on the books as owing money to the town, the replies received 
thereto indicating that the accounts, as listed, are correct. 

The accounts of the tax collector, as collector for the North Chelmsford 
Fire District and the Chelmsford Water District, were examined and checked 
in detail, and the payments to the treasurer were checked with the amounts 
entered on the treasurer's cash book. 

The books and accounts of the tax collector and treasurer, as well as of 
the accountant, have been kept in an efficient manner, thereby facilitating the 
work of the audit. 

The town clerk's records of sporting, dog, and town licenses were ex- 
amined. The payments to the State were verified by a comparison with re- 
ceipts on file, and the payments to the town treasurer were compared with the 
treasurer's cash book. 



The accounts of the health, public welfare, and school departments, as 
well as those of the other departments collecting money for the town or 
committing bills for collection, were examined and reconciled with the ac- 
countant's and the treasurer's books. 

It was noted that various uncollected bills of the tree warden's, health, 
highway, and public welfare departments are of several years' standing. A 
determined effort should be made to collect these bills, but if it is found that 
they are uncollectible, they should be abated by the departments in which 
the charges originated. 

It was found that the greater portion of the fines and other receipts of 
the ( Adams Library have been used to defray incidental expenses. In the 
future, the full amount of these receipts should be paid over to the town 
treasurer, in accordance with the provisions of Section 53, Chapter 44, 
General Laws. 

It is recommended that complete information pertaining to all licenses 
and permits granted by the selectmen be shown in the records of their 
meetings. 

The savings bank books representing the investment of the trust and 
investment funds in the custody of the town treasurer, the treasurer of the 
library trustees, and the insurance fund commissioners were examined and 
listed. The income was proved and the withdrawals were checked with the 
receipts shown in the treasurer's cash book. 

The surety bonds of the treasurer, collector, town clerk, and insurance 
fund commissioners for the faithful performance of their duties were ex- 
amined and found to be in proper form. 

In addition to the balance sheet mentioned above, there are appended to 
this report tables showing a reconciliation of the treasurer's cash, summar- 
ies of the tax, assessment, and departmental accounts, as well as tab 1 es show- 
ing the trust and investment fund transactions. 

For the courtesies extended by the various town officials during the 
progress of the audit, I wish, on behalf of my assistants and for myself, to 
express appreciation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HERMAN B. DINE, 

Assistant Director of Accounts. 



RECONCILIATION OF TREASURER'S CASH 

Balance January 1, 1933 $ 13,084.v9 

Receipts 415,138.29 

$423,223.28 

1 >a\ 'fnents $392,417 08 

Balance December 31, 1933 • 35,806.20 

— $428,223.28 

Balance January 1, 1934 $ 35,806 20 

Receipts January 1 to June 16, 1934 149,475.68 

$185,281.88 

Payments January 1 to June 16, 1934.... $149,155.11 

Balance June 16, 1934 : 

Union Old Lowell National Bank $ 13,401.15 

Appleton National Bank of Lowell $ 21,656.87 

Cash in office, verified 1,068.75 36.126.77 

$185,281.88 



UNION OLD LOWELL NATIONAL BANK 

Balance June 16, 1934, per statement $ 27,(>44 S2 

Balance June 16, 1934, per check register $ 13,401.15 

Outstanding checks June 16, 1934, per list 14,243.67 

$ 27,644.82 



APPLETON NATIONAL BANK OF LOWELL 

Balance June 16, 1934, per statement $ 21.746 57 

Balance June 16. 1934, per check register $ 21,656.87 

Outstanding checks June 16, 1934, per list 89.70 

$21,746 57 



TAXES — 1926 

Outstanding April 17, 1932, per previous 

audit $ 868.90 

Moth assessments 1926 reported as taxes 

1926 3 00 

$ 871.90 

Payments to Treasurer : 

April 17 to December 31, 1932 $ 269.35 

1933 388.01 

$ 657.36 

Abatements : 
April 17 to December 31, 1932 $ 27.30 

1933 187.24 

■ 214.54 

$ 871.90 



TAXES— 1927 

Outstanding April 17, 1932, per previous 

audit ..._ $ 2,252 21 

Payments to treasurer : 

April 17 to December 31, 1932 $ 895.42 

1933 237.16 



Abatements : 

April 17 to December 31, 1932 $ 1,062.64 

1933 33.14 



$ 1,132.58 



1,095.78 



Tax titles taken by town April 17 to 
December 31, 1932 23.85 



$ 2.252 21 



TAXES — 1928 

Outstanding April 17, 1932, per previous 
audit $ 3,091.09 

Adjustments : 

Excess abatements $ 1.00 

Payments after abatement 5.13 

Overpayments to Collector 12.69 

1882 

$ 3,109.91 

Payments to Treasurer : 

April 17 to December 31, 1932 1,195.40 

1933 496.43 

$ 1.691.83 

Abatements : 

April 17 to December 31, 1932 $ 1,185.36 

1933 91.61 

1,276.97 

Tax titles taken by town April 17 to 
December 31, 1932 110.09 

Added to tax titles April 17 to December 

31, 1932 22.56 



Charges against E. W. Sweetser dis- 
crepancy account 8.46 



$ 3,109.91 



TAXES — 1929 

Outstanding April 17, 1932, per previous 
audit $ 1,618.15 

Adjustment : 

Payments after abatement 4.00 

Payments to Treasurer : 

April 17 to December 31, 1932 $ 413.02 

1933 234.49 



Abatements : 

April 17 to December 31, 1932 . $ 522 32 

1933 183.52 



$ 647.51 



705.84 



Tax titles taken by town April 17 to 

December 31, 1932 37 80 

Added to tax titles April 17 to December 

31, 1932 __ 231.00 



TAXES — 1930 

Outstanding April 17, 1932, per previous 
audit 

Abatements after payment, adjusted 

Payments after abatement, adjusted 

Payments to Treasurer April 17 to De- 
cember 31, 1932 

Abatements April 17 to December 31, 
1932 _ 

Tax titles taken by town April 17 to 
December 31, 1932 

Added to- tax titles April 17 to Decem- 
ber 31. 1932 



$ 1,622.15 



$ 1,622 15 



$ 17,944.98 




2.00 




9.88 






$ 17,956 86 


$ 16,414.50 


627.60 




617.16 




297.60 






$ 17,956.86 





TAXES— 1931 

Outstanding April 17, 1932, per previous 

audit $ 65,411.42 

Abatements after payment, refunded: 

April 17 to December 31, 1932 $ 32 00 

1933 179.78 

. 211.78 

Old age assistance taxes 1931 reported 

as taxes 1931 481.00 

Adjustments : 
Old age assistance taxes 1931 reported 

as taxes 1931 $ 91.00 

Collections not committed 4.00 

Payments after abatement 10.00 

Overpayments to Collector 1.02 



106.02 



$ 59,681 57 



Payments to Treasurer : 

April 17 to December 31, 1932 $ 38,017 52 

1933 21,664.05 

Abatements : 

April 17 to December 31, 1932 $ 651.84 

1933 1,161.04 

1.812.88 

Tax titles taken by town 1933 4.095 43 

Added to tax titles : 

April 17 to December 31, 1932 $ 195.20 

1933 355.80 

551 00 



Adjustments : 

Taxes 1931 reported as old age assist- 
ance taxes 1931 $ 1.00 

Abatements not reported 2.00 

Refunds charged to taxes 1931 in 
error 66.34 69 34 



$ 66 210 22 



$ 66 210 22 



10 



TAXES— 1932 

Commitment per warrant $240,913.48 

Additional commitment 668.59 



$241,582.07 



Abatements after payment, refunded : 

1932 $ 427.14 

1933 797.44 

1,224.58 

Overpayments to Collector, refunded 1.00 



Payments to Treasurer : 

1932 $138,101.16 

1933 . 63,290.26 

$201,391.42 

Abatements : 

1932 $ 2,125 41 

1933 .:. -. 1,852.11 

■ 3,977.52 

Outstanding December 31, 1933... 37.438.71 



Outstanding January 1, 1934 $ 37 438.71 

Adj ustments : 

Commitment list in excess of warrant 19.00 
Old age assistance taxes 1932 reported 

as taxes 1932 100.00 

Refunds not previously entered 17.90 

Overpayments to Collector .10 

Collections not committed 2.00 



$242,807.65 



Payments to Treasurer January 1 to 
June 16, 1934 $ 14,015.55 

Adjustments : 

Taxes 1932 reported as old age as- 
sistance taxes 1932 2.00 

Abatements not previously reported—. 137.89 

Outstanding June 16, 1934, per list 23,422.27 



$242,807.65 



$ 37,577.71 



$ 37,577.71 



11 



TAXES— 1933 

Commitment per warrant $218,258.72 

Additional commitment 141.12 

$218,399.84 

Abatements after payment, refunded 6.40 

$218,406 24 

Payments to Treasurer $126,243.35 

Abatements 379.04 

Outstanding December 31, 1933 91,783 85 

$218,406.24 



Outstanding January 1, 1934 $ 91,783.85 

Additional commitment 18.00 

Adjustments : 

Abatements reported in error 160.00 

Old age assistance taxes 1933 reported 

as taxes 1933 18.00 

Interest reported as taxes 1933 .92 

Abatements after payment, refunded 8 00 

Overpayments to Collector, refunded 5 28 

$ 91,994 05 

Payments to Treasurer January 1 to 

June 16, 1934 $ 26,498.36 

Adjustments : 

Error in commitment 6 00 

Abatements not previously reported.... 73.60 

Outstanding June 16, 1934, per list 65,416.09 

$ 91,994.05 



12 



OLD AGE ASSISTANCE TAXES— 1931 

Outstanding April 17, 1932, per previous 

audit $ 927.00 

Payments to Treasurer : 

April 17 to December 31, 1932 $ 44.00 

1933 171.00 

$ 215.00 

Refunds by State: 

April 17 to December 31, 1932 $ 87.00 

1933 59.00 

146.00 

Old age assistance taxes 1931 reported 

as taxes 1931 481.00 

Outstanding December 31, 1933 85.00 

$ 927 00 

Outstanding January 1, 1934 «5 85.00 

Adjustments : 
Taxes 1931 reported as old age assist- 
ance taxes 1931 1.00 

Overpayments to Collector 5.00 

$ 91.00 

Old age assistance taxes 1931 reported 
as taxes 1931 . $ 91.00 



13 



OLD AGE ASSISTANCE TAXES— 1932 

Commitment $ 2,252.1)0 

Payments to Treasurer: 

1932 $ 994.00 

1933 754 00 

$ 1,748.00 

Refunds by State 8.00 

Outstanding December 31, 1933 496 00 

$ 2,252.un 

Outstanding January 1, 1934 $ 496.00 

Adjustments : 
Additional commitment not previously 

reported 8.00 

Taxes 1932 reported as old age 

assistance taxes 1932 2.00 

Collections not committed 1.00 

$ 507.00 

Payments to Treasurer January 1 to 

June 16, 1934 8 87.00 

Old age assistance taxes 1932 reported 

as taxes 1932 100.00 

Outstanding June 16, 1934, per list 320.00 

$ 507.00 

OLD AGE ASSISTANCE TAXES — 1933 

Commitment per warrant $ 2,302 00 

Payments to Treasurer $ 1,037.00 

Outstanding December 31, 1933 1,265.00 

$ 2,302.00 

Outstanding January 1, 1934 $ 1,265.00 

Additional Commitment 6.00 

$ 1,271.00 

Payments to Treasurer January 1 to 
June 16, 1934 $ 490.00 

Old age assistance taxes 1933 reported 

as taxes 1933 18 00 

Outstanding June 16, 1934, per list 763.00 

$ 1,271.00 



14 



MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE TAXES — 1931 

Outstanding April 17, 193-2, per previous 

audit $ 624.05 

Refunds 5.12 

$ 629.17 

Payments to Treasurer April 17 to De- 
cember 31, 1932 $ 409.27 

Abatements April 17 to December 31, 
1932 216.34 

Outstanding December 31, 1932, and 

June 16, 1934, per list 3.56 

$ 629.17 



MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE TAXES— 1932 

Commitment per warrants $ 11,891.76 

Additional commitment 4.00 

$ 11,895.76 

Abatements after payment, refunded: 

1932 _ $ 197.57 

1933 - .....: 264.74 

462.31 

Adjustments : 

Errors in abatements $ 76.60 

Refunds 146.33 

Overpayments to Collector 3.61 

226.54 

Overpayments to be refunded 2.00 

$ 12,586.61 

Payments to Treasurer : 

1932 .._ _ $ 10,040.06 

1933 : _ 1,476.90 

$ 11,516.96 

Abatements : . 

1932 $ 705.25 

1933 307.65 

$ 1,012.90 

Outstanding December 31, 1933 56.75 

$ 12,586.61 

Outstanding January 1, 1934 $ 56.75 

Payments to Treasurer January 1 to 

June 16, 1934 $ 56.25 

Outstanding June 16, 1934 per list .50 

$ 56.75 



15 



MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE TAXES — 1933 

Commitments per warrants $ 10,857.50 

Abatements after payment, refunded 285.63 

$ 11,143.13 

Payments to Treasurer ? 8,530.23 

Abatements 446.42 

Outstanding December 31, 1933 2,166.48 

$ 11,143.13 

Outstanding January 1. 1934 $ 2,166.48 

Additional commitment 30.15 

Abatements after payment, refunded 69.36 

Adjustments : 

Duplicate abatement 9.15 

Overpayments to Collector _ .10 

Payments after abatement, to be re- 
funded 8.58 

Overpayments to Collector, to be re- 
funded 2.31 

$ 2.286.13 

Payments to Treasurer, January 1 to 

June 16, 1934 $ 1,342.07 

Abatements January 1 to June 16, 1934 71.04 

Abatements not previously reported 21.03 

Outstanding June 16, 1934, per list.-. 851.99 

$ 2.286.13 



MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE TAXES — 1934 

Commitment per warrants $ 6.142 66 

Abatements after payment, refunded 103.86 



Payments to Treasurer. January 1 to 

June 16. 1934 $ 4,989.57 

Abatements January 1 to June 16. 1934.. 172.96 

Outstanding June 16. 1934, per list 1,083.99 



$ 6.246.52 



S 6.246.52 



16 



MOTH ASSESSMENTS — 1926 

Outstanding April 17, 1932, per previous 
audit $ 

Abatements April 17 to December 31, 
1932 $ 4.88 

Moth assessments 1926 reported as taxes 
1926 _ _ 3.00 



INTEREST ON TAXES AND ASSESSMENTS 

Collections April 17, 1932, to June 16, 
1934: 
Taxes : 

Levy of 1926 $ 68 65 

Levy of 1927 116.95 

Levy of 1928 235.96 

Levy of 1929 124.91 

Levy of 1930 1,819.40 

Levy of 1931 3,999.43 

Levy of 1932 3,971.53 

Levy of 1933 763.62 

$ 11,100.45 

Motor vehicle excise taxes : 

Levy of 1931 $ 16.10 

Levy of 1932 116.06 

Levy of 1933 . 101.51 

Levy of 1934 11.62 

245.29 

$ 11,345 74 

Payments to Treasurer : 

April 17 to December 31, 1932 $ 3,965.22 

1933 5,432.10 

January 1 to June 16, 1934 1.948.42 

$ 11,345 74 



17 



TAX TITLES 

Balance April 17, 1932, per previous 

audit $ 846.85 

Tax titles taken by town : 

April 17 to December 31, 1932: 

Taxes 1927 $ 23.85 

Taxes 1928 110 09 

Taxes 1929 37.80 

Taxes 1930 617.16 

$ 788.90 

1933: 
Taxes 1931 4,095.43 

Added to tax titles : 

April 17 to December 31, 1932: 

Taxes 1928 $ 22.56 

Taxes 1929 231.00 

Taxes 1930 297.60 

Taxes 1931 195.20 

■ 746.36 

1933: 

Taxes 1931 355 80 

Interest and costs : 

April 17 to December 31, 1932 $ 288.06 

1933 709.47 

997.53 



Tax titles redeemed 1933 _ $ 479.60 

Balance December 31, 1933 7,351.27 



$ 7,830.87 

- $ 7,830.87 

Balance January 1, 1934 $ 7,351.27 

Tax titles redeemed January 1 to June 

16, 1934 , $ 1,594.08 

Balance June 16, 1934, per list 5,757.19 

$ 7,351.27 



CHELMSFORD WATER DISTRICT — TAXES 1926 

Outstanding April 17, 1932, per previous 

audit $ 254.18 

Payments to District Treasurer, 1933.... $ .12 

Abatements, 1933 254.06 

$ 254.18 



18 



CHELMSFORD WATER DISTRICT — TAXES 1927 

Outstanding April 17, 1932, per previous 

audit $ 107.41 

Interest collections -71 

$ 108.12 

Payments to District Treasurer April 17 

to December 31, 1932 $ 3.89 

Abatements 1933 104.23 

$ 108.12 



CHELMSFORD WATER DISTRICT— TAXES 1928 

Outstanding April 17, 1932, per previous 

audit ..._ $ 112.08 

Interest collections $ .98 

$ 113.06 

Payments to District Treasurer, April 17 

to December 31, 1932 $ 5.41 

Abatements 1933 107.65 

$ 113.06 



NORTH CHELMSFORD FIRE DISTRICT — TAXES 1926 

Outstanding April 17, 1932, per previous 
audit $ 20.42 

Abatements April 17 to December 31, 

1932 $ 20.32 

Outstanding June 16, 1934, per list .10 

$ 20.42 



NORTH CHELMSFORD FIRE DISTRICT— TAXES 1927 

Outstanding April 17, 1932, per previous 
audit $ 10-65 

Abatements : 

April 17 to December 31, 1932 $ 8.70 

January 1 to June 16, 1934 1-95 

$ 10.65 



19 



NORTH CHELMSFORD FIRE DISTRICT— TAXES 1928 

Outstanding April 17, 1932, per previous 

audit $ 12.07 

Interest collections .06 

$ 12.13 

Payments to District Treasurer April 17 
to December 31, 1932 $ .44 

Abatements : 

April 17 to December 31, 1932 $ 9.89 

lanuary 1 to June 16, 1934 1.80 

11.69 

$ 12.13 



NORTH CHELMSFORD FIRE DISTRICT— TAXES 1929 

Outstanding April 17, 1932, per previous 

audit $ 25.10. 

Interest collections ' .08 



Payments to District Treasurer April 17 
to December 31, 1932 $ .48 

Abatements : 

April 17 to December 31, 1932 $ 7.06 

January 1 to June 16, 1934 17.64 

24.70 



NORTH CHELMSFORD FIRE DISTRICT — TAXES 1930 

Outstanding April 17, 1932, per previous 

audit $ 59.07 

Interest collections 5.79 



Payments to District Treasurer : 

April 17 to December 31, 1932 $ 52.12 

1933 6.06 



$ 58.18 



Abatements : 

1933 $ 4.58 

January 1 to June 16, 1934 2.10 



20 



25.18 



25.18 



64.86 



6.68 
$ 64.86 



NORTH CHELMSFORD FIRE DISTRICT — TAXES 1931 

Cash in town treasury April 17, 1932, 

per previous audit $ 11.94 

Outstanding April 17, 1932, per previous 

audit 427.20 

Interest collections 18.94 

Abatement after payment, refunded 5.60 



Payments to District Treasurer: 

April 17 to December 31, 1932 $ 305.65 

1933 1 16. 17 

$ 421.82 

Abatements April 17 to December 31, 

1932 7.23 

Refunds by Town Treasurer 5.60 

Outstanding June 16, 1934, per list 29.03 



PUBLIC WELFARE DEPARTMENT 

Accounts Receivable 

Outstanding January 1, 1933 $ 7,386.88 

Charges , 8,388.86 

Payments to Treasurer $ 6,871.28 

Outstanding December 31, 1933 8,904.46 

• 



$ 463: 



463. 



$ 15,775.74 
$ 15,775.74 



Outstanding January 1, 1934 $ 8,904.46 

Payments to Treasurer January 1 to 

June 16, 1934 $ 738.70 

Disallowances January 1 to June 16, 

• 1934 274.77 

Outstanding June 16, 1934, per list 7,890.99 

$ 8,904.46 



21 



OLD AGE ASSISTANCE 

Accounts Receivable 

Charges 1933 $ 3,050.37 

Payments to Treasurer $ 2,633.46 

Disallowances 106.91 

Outstanding December 31, 1933 320 00 

$ 3,06037 



Outstanding January 1, 1934 $ 320 00 

Charges January 1 to June 16, 1934 2,739.87 



$ 3.059.87 

Outstanding June 16, 1934, per list $ 3,059.87 



ADAMS EMERSON LIBRARY FUND 

In Custody of Library Trustees 

Savings 

Deposits Total 

On hand at beginning of year 1933 $243.19 $243.19 

On hand at end of year 1933 204.05 204.05 

On hand June 16, 1934 164.05 164.05 

RECEIPTS PAYMENTS 

1933 
Withdrawn from savings Transferred to library 

deposits $39.14 treasurer $46. 41 

Income 7.27 



$46.41 $46.41 

January 1 to June 16, 1934 
Withdrawn from savings Transferred to library 
deposits $40.00 treasurer $40.00 



22 



JOSEPH WARREN LIBRARY FUND 

In Custody of Library Trustees 

Savings 

Deposits Total 

On hand at beginning of year 1933 $869.76 $869.76 

On hand at end of year 1933 898.23 898.23 

On hand June 16, 1934 898.23 89823 

RECEIPTS PAYMENTS 

1933 

Income $28.47 Added to savings deposits $28.47 



SELINA G. RICHARDSON LIBRARY FUND 

In Custody of Library Trustees 

Savings 
Deposits Total 

On hand at beginning of year 1933 $425.56 $425.56 

On hand at end of year 1933 439.50 439.50 

On hand June 16, 1934 439.50 439.50 

RECEIPTS PAYMENTS 

1933 

Income $13.94 Added to savings deposits $13.94 



GEORGE LIBRARY FUND 

In Custody of Library Trustees 

Savings 

Deposits Total 

On hand at beginning of year 1933 $2,064.12 $2,064.12 

On hand at end of year 1933 2,131.74 2,131.74 

On hand June 16, 1934 2,131.74 2,131.74 

RECEIPTS PAYMENTS 
1933 
Income $67.62 Added to savings deposits $67.62 



23 



AMOS F. ADAMS LIBRARY FUND 
In Custody of Library Trustees 

Savings 
Deposits 

On hand at beginning of year 1933 $10,047.15 

On hand at end of year 1933 10.24277 

On hand June 16, 1934 10,042 77 



RECEIPTS 



PAYMENTS 



1933 



Total 
$10,047.15 
10,242 77 
10,042 77 



Income $395.62 



Added to savings deposits $195.62 

Transferred to library 
treasurer 200 00 



$395.62 
January 1 to June 16, 1934 



Withdrawn from savings 
deposits 



$200.00 



Transferred to library 
treasurer 



$395.62 



$200 00 



AARON GEORGE CEMETERY FUND 
In Custody of Library Trustees 

Savings 
Deposits 

On hand at beginning of year 1933 $1,017 95 

On hand at end of year 1933 1,016.28 

On hand June 16, 1934 1,016.28 

RECEIPTS PAYMENTS 

1933 

Withdrawn from savings Transferred to library 

deposits $ 1.67 treasurer for care of 

Income 33.33 tombstones 



Total 

$1,017.95 

1,016.28 

1,016 28 



$35.00 



$35.00 
$35.00 



24 



CEMETERY PERPETUAL CARE FUNDS 

In Custody of Town Treasurer 

Savings 

Deposits Total 

On hand at beginning of year 1933 $23,752 27 $23,752.27 

On hand at end of year 1933 24,427.26 24,427.26 

On hand June 16, 1934 24,427 26 24,427.26 

RECEIPTS PAYMENTS 

1933 

Income $759.68 Added to savings deposits $674 99 

Bequests 600.00 Transferred to town 684.69 



$1 359.68 $1,359.68 



HARRIET N. EDWARDS CEMETERY FUND 

In Custody of Town Treasurer 

Savings 

Deposits Total 

On hand at beginning of year 1933 $255.03 $255.03 

On hand at end of year 1933 256 38 256.38 

On hand June 16, 1934 256.38 256.38 

RECEIPTS PAYMENTS 

1933 

Income - $8.35 Added to savings deposits $1.35 

Transferred to Town 7.00 

$8 35 $8.35 



25 



ADAMS EMERSON CEMETERY IMPROVEMENT FUND 

In Custody of Town Treasurer 

Savings 

Deposits Total 

On hand at beginning of year 1933 $142.61 $142 61 

On hand at end of year 1933 147 28 147.28 

On hand June 16, 1934 147.28 147.23 

RECEIPTS PAYMENTS 

1933 

Income $4.67 Added to savings deposits $4.67 



INSURANCE INVESTMENT FUND 
In Custody of Insurance Fund Commissioners 



Savings 
Deposits 

On hand at beginning of year 1933 $35,206 11 

On hand at end of year 1933 36,307 44 

On hand June 16, 1934 36,307.44 



Total 
$35,206.11 
36.307.44 
36,307.44 



RECEIPTS 



PAYMENTS 



1933 



Income $1,101 33 Added to savings deposits.... $1,101.33 



WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION FUND 

In Custody of Insurance Fund Commissioners 

Savings 

Deposits Total 

On hand at beginning of year 1933 $150.00 $150.00 

On hand at end of year 1933 116.77 116 77 

On hand June 16, 1934 116 77 116.77 

RECEIPTS PAYMENTS 

1933 

Withdrawn from savings Workmen's compensation $37.00 

deposits $33.23 

Income 3.77 

$3700 $37.00 



26 



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Town Clerk's Report 



OFFICERS ELECTED 

MODERATOR 
WALTER PERHAM 
(Term Expires 193 : 

TOWN CLERK 
HAROLD C PETTERS 
(Term Expires 1936) 

SELECTMEN AND BOARD OF PUBLIC WELFARE 

FRANK J. LUPIEX Term Expires 1935 

STEWART MacKAY Term Expires 1936 

JAMES A GRAXT Term Expires 1937 

TREASURER AND TAX COLLECTOR 

HAROLD C PETTERSON 

(Term Expires 1935) 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

WARREX WRIGHT — _ _ _ ..Tern; Expirei 

JOHX E. HARRIXGTOX___- Term Expires 1936 

HERBERT _ SWEETSER -Term Expires 1937 

TREE WARDEN 

VIXCEXT P. GARVEY 

(Term Expires 1935) 

BOARD OF HEALTH 

JAMES KIBERD, Jr Term Expires 1935 

FREDERICK A MacELRC V Term Expires 1936 

GEORGE _NULTY_ _ Term Expires 1937 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

JOHX A McADAMS _ Term Expires 1935 

RALPH A BERG _. -Term Expires 1936 

TAMES P. CASSIDY Term Expires 1937 

30 



PARK COMMISSIONERS 

MICHAEL J. WELSH ■ Term Expires 1935 

FRED L. FLETCHER _ Term Expires 1936 

WALTER MERRILL Term Expires 1937 

CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 

BAYARD C. DEAN Term Expires 1935 

ARTHUR O. WHEELER Term Expires 1936 

C. WESLEY LYONS Term Expires 1937 



TRUSTEES OF ADAMS LIBRARY 

FRANCES CLARK Term Expires 1935....FREDERICK A. P. FISKE 

ALBERT H DAVIS Term Expires 1936 FRED W PARK 

LUELLA H. S. CLARK Term Expires 1937 LOTTIE L SNOW 



SINKING FUND COMMISSIONERS 

RAYMOND A. REID Term Expires 1935 

ROYAL SHAWCROSS Term Expires 1936 

WALTER PERHAM Term Expires 1937 

CONSTABLE 

JOHN J. BUCHANAN 
(Term Expires 1935) 



APPOINTED TOWN OFFICIALS 

TOWN ACCOUNTANT 
WINTHROP A. PARKHURST 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 
JOHN C. MONAHAN EMILE E. PAIGNON 

BIRGER PETTERSON JOHN G. PARKER 

GEORGE W. DAY WILLIAM T. PICKEN 



SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS 

ANCEL E. TAYLOR 

INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 
ARNOLD C- PERHAM 



31 



FIRE ENGINEERS 
JOHN KEMPE HARRY SHEDD JOHN DIXON 

MOTH SUPERINTENDENT 
VINCENT P. GARVEY 



REGISTRARS OF VOTERS 

G. CARLTON BROWN (Resigned) Term Expires 1935 

RALPH GREEN (To fill vacancy) Term Expires 1935 

KARL M. PERHAM Term Expires 1936 

JAMES F. LEAHEY Term Expires 1937 

HAROLD C. PETTERSON Ex-Officio 



TOWN COUNSEL 

JOHN H. VALENTINE 

JANITORS OF PUBLIC HALLS 

JOHN B. WRIGLEY Centre Hall, Chelmsford 

No appointment made North Hall. North Chelmsford 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 
WALLACE GREIG 



FOREST FIRE WARDEN 

GILBERT PERHAM 

SUPERINTENDENT OF INFIRMARY 
SINAI SIMARD 



SUPERINTENDENT OF BURIALS 

OF INDIGENT SOLDIERS AND SAILORS 

WALTER PERHAM 



CHIEF OF POLICE 
BERNARD F. McGOVERN 

REGULAR POLICE 

WINSLOW P. GEORGE RALPH J. HULSLANDER 

ALLAN ADAMS 



32 



SPECIAL POLICE 

LEO BOUCHER ROBERT DELONG WILLIAM REID 

EMERGENCY POLICE OFFICERS 

BASIL LARKIN CHARLES SEARLES 

ALLAN KIDDER GILBERT PERHAM 

ROYCE M. PARKER WALLACE GREIG 

JOHN McENANEY JOHN WRIGLEY 

SPECIAL POLICE FOR ADAMS LIBRARY 

CURTIS AIKEN SAMUEL FELCH 

SPECIAL POLICE FOR SCHOOL WORK 

CHARLES CAMPBELL GEORGE MOORE GEORGE MARINEL 
ALBERT RUSSON PERCY ROBINSON 



SPECIAL POLICE FOR MIDDLESEX COUNTY 
TRAINING SCHOOL 

DANIEL PLUMMER 

SPECIAL POLICE FOR TOWN INFIRMARY 

SINAI SIMARD 



SPECIAL POLICE FOR DANIEL GAGE CO-, INC ICE PLANT 

MINOT SECORD^ 

SPECIAL POLICE FOR HIGHWAY DEPT- 

ANCEL E. TAYLOR 

SPECIAL POLICE FOR NORTH CHELMSFORD FIRE DISTRICT 

MORTON M. WRIGHT MORTON B. WRIGHT 

POLICE WOMAN 

MAE S. LEWIS 



MEASURERS OF SAWDUST 
RICHARD E. DAVIS MYRON A. QUEEN 

HENRY SARGENT PEARL T. DURRELL 

ARTHUR GAUTHIER 



33 



WEIGHERS OF COAL AND COKE 

EDWARD T. HE. HAROLD D. MACDO: 

LY D McCRADY 

FAMES 

ARTHUR HEALY JOHN J. DU 

HERBERT E. ELLIOT 



WEIGHERS OF HAY 
HAROLD D. MACDONALD 

MEASURERS OF LUMBER 

MYRON A ARNOLD MARSHALL 

RRYL-PARKHUI ARTHUR ZR 

HENRY SARGENT I .-.:- L 7. DURRZZZ 

FRANK PRESCOTT FRANCIS O. DU7Z 
RAYMOND DORS Z V ROL CRAFT 

RICHARD E. DA HN LYM 

MEASURERS OF WOOD 

.MY1 RICHARD E. DA 

HOSMER W SWEETS ARTHUR G V Z ZZ Z R 

z :.-.:-.:-:. z ?az:-:z:zzsz pearl t. durrell 

HENRY SARGENT 

MEASURERS OF LOGS 
ZZZ HENRY SARGENT JAMES A- BERTON 

FENCE VIEWERS 
A REID RGE M 

WEIGHERS OF MERCHANDISE 

JOSEPH L Z Z Z Z Z WILLLAM BRO 

OCTAVE LHERAULT 

ZL 

z zz .-.:-: iY 

R PERK 

WILLIAM WILLIA: 

MEMORIAL DAY COMMIT~EE 

EDWIGGl ARCHIBALD COOKE 

'- 



WEIGHERS OF SAND AND GRAVEL 

ROY BUNTEL VICTOR BUNTEL 

MEAT INSPECTOR 
WINTON C. GALE ALBERT S. PARK 

ANIMAL INSPECTOR 
ARNOLD C. PERHAM 

AGENT BOARD OF HEALTH 

MAE S. LEWIS 

SCHOOL NURSE 

MAE S. LEWIS 

SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

GEORGE S. WRIGHT 



35 



Warrant for Annual Town Meeting 

FEBRUARY 5. 1934. and FEBRUARY 12, 1934 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX. SS. 

To John J. Buchanan, Constable, or any suitable person of the Town of 
Chelmsford. 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid you are hereby requested 
to notify and warn the legal voters of said Chelmsford to meet in their 
several Polling Places, viz. : 

Precinct 1 — Town Hall, Chelmsford Centre. 

Precinct 2 — Town Hall. North Chelmsford. 

Precinct 3 — Fire House, West Chelmsford. 

Precinct 4 — School House. East Chelmsford. 

Precinct 5 — Liberty Hall, South Chelmsford. 

Precinct 6 — Golden Cove School House, Westlands. 
on Monday, the fifth day of February, 1934, being the first Monday in said 
month, at 12 o'clock noon, for the following purposes : 

To bring in their votes for the following officers : 

Moderator for one year. 

One Selectman for three years. 

One member of the Board of Public Welfare for three years. 

Treasurer and Tax Collector for one year. 

One Assessor for three years. 

Tree Warden for one year. 

One member of the Board of Health for three years. 

One Park Commissioner for three years. 

One Cemetery Commissioner for three years. 

Two Trustees of Adams Library for three years. 

One Trustee of Adams Library for one year, to fill unexpired term. 

One Sinking Fund Commissioner for three years. 

One Constable for one year. 

One School Committee member for three years. 

And to vote on the following questions, namely : 

1 — Shall licenses be granted in this Town for the sale there- 
in of all alcoholic beverages (whiskey, rum, gin, malt 
beverages, wines and all other alcoholic beverages) ? 
2 — Shall licenses be granted in this Town for the sale there- 
in of wines and malt beverages (wines and beer, ale and 
all other malt beverages) ? 

All on one ballot. 

The polls will be open from 12 noon to 8 P. M., and to meet in the 
Town Hall at Chelmsford Centre on the following Monday, the twelfth day 

36 



of February, at 10 o'clock, in the forenoon, then and there to act upon the 
following articles, viz. : 

ARTICLE 1. To hear reports of Town Officers and Committees; or act in 
relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 2. To raise and appropriate such sums of money as may be 
required to defray Town charges for the current year. 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will authorize the Selectmen to act as its 
agent in any suit or suits which may arise during the current year ; also 
in such other matters as may arise requiring in their judgment the ac- 
tion of such agent, and to employ counsel therefor; or act in relation 
thereto. 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will authorize the Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money in anticipation of the 
revenues of the current financial year. 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum 
not exceeding $2000, to be used as a Reserve Fund at the discretion of 
the Finance Committee, as provided in General Laws, Chapter 40, Sec- 
tion 6 ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a suf- 
ficient sum with which to meet unpaid bills of 1933 ; or act in relation 
thereto. 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to accept Sylvan Avenue as laid 
out by the Selectmen as shown by their report and plan duly filed in the 
office of the Town Clerk; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 8. In the event of an affirmative vote under Article 7, to see if 
the Town will vote to raise and appropriate One Hundred Dollars, or 
some other sum, for the purpose of repairing Sylvan Avenue ; or act in 
relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to accept Jensen Street as laid 
out by the Selectmen as shown by their report and plan duly filed in the 
office of the Town Clerk ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 10. In the event of an affirmative vote under Article 9, to see if 
the Town will vote to raise and appropriate Two Hundred Dollars, or 
some other sum, for the purpose of repairing Jensen Street; or act in 
relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to accept Linwood Street as 
laid out by the Selectmen as shown by their report and plan duly filed 
in the office of the Town Clerk; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 12. In the event of an affirmative vote under Article 11, to see 
if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate One Hundred Dollars, 
or some other sum, for: the purpose of grading and repairing Linwood 
Street ; or act in relation thereto. 

37 



ARTICLE 13. To sec if the Town will vote to accept Dunston Street as 
laid out by the Selectmen as shown by their report and plan duly filed 
in the office of the Town Clerk; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 14. In the event of an affirmative vote under Article 13, to see 
if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate Two Hundred Dollars, or 
some other sum, for the purpose of grading and repairing Dunston 
Street ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to accept Twist Road as laid 
out by the Selectmen as shown by their report and plan duly filed in the 
office of the Town Clerk ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 16. In the event of an affirmative vote under Article 15, to see 
if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate Two Hundred Dollars, or 
some other sum, for the purpose of grading and repairing Twist Road ; 
or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of One Hundred Dollars, or some other sum, for the purpose of 
defraying the salary of the Fish and Game Warden ; or act in relation 
thereto. 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town -will vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of Seven Hundred Dollars, or some other sum, for the purpose of 
purchasing an automobile truck for the Forest Fire Department ; or act 
in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of Twenty-five Dollars for the purpose of paying a claim for land 
damages to John J. Gallagher, for land seized on the Riverneck Road ; 
or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of Twenty-five Dollars for the purpose of settling property and 
personal injury claim of William H. Davis; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of Four Hundred Dollars, or some other sum, for the purpose of 
defraying the expense of concerts to be rendered by the Chelmsford 
Band ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to request the Department of 
Corporations and Taxation, Division of Accounts, to make an audit of 
the Town of Chelmsford accounts during the year 1934; or act in rela- 
tion thereto. 

ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of Four Thousand Dollars, or some other sum, for the purpose of 
reconstructing Middlesex Street, a similar amount to be contributed 
respectively by the Commonwealth and County of Middlesex ; or act in 
relation thereto. 

38 



ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of Four Thousand Dollars, or some other sum, for the purpose of 
constructing the North Road ; a similar amount to be contributed by the 
Commonwealth and County of Middlesex; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of Twenty-five Hundred Dollars, or some other sum, for the pur- 
pose of purchasing a power scraper for the Highway Department; or 
act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of Four Hundred and Thirty-six Dollars for the purpose of pay- 
ing the award of the Court in the matter of the petition for land dam- 
ages of Daniel V. Sullivan, et al., or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate One 
Hundred and Thirty -nine Dollars for the purpose of paying the award 
of the Court in the matter of the petition for land damages of Manuel 
Mello ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of One Hundred and Sixty-six Dollars and Thirty-eight Cents to 
balance overdraft on Old Westford Road account; or act in relation 
thereto. 

ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of One Thousand Dollars for the purpose of grading, seeding and 
the installation of a drinking fountain and otherwise embellish the Com- 
mon at the North Village ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of Six Hundred Dollars, or some other sum, for the purpose of 
purchasing seats and furniture for use at the Town Hall at the North 
Village ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to change the date of the 
Annual Town Meeting from the First Monday in February to the First 
Monday in March, beginning in the year 1935 ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 
sufficient sum of money for the purpose of defraying the expense of 
foreclosing tax titles ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of Five Thousand Four Hundred and Forty-six Dollars and Eighty- 
six Cents ($5,446.86) for the purpose of balancing an overdraft in the 
Outside Aid and Old Age Assistance Account ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of Three Thousand Dollars, or some other sum, for the purpose of 
paying for tools, materials, equipment purchased and to be purchased to 
continue work under the Civil Works Administration projects; or act in 
relation thereto. 

39 



ARTICLE 35. To bet.' if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of Fifty Dollars for the purpose of defraying the expenses of the 
Local Administrator of the Civil Works Administration ; or act in re- 
lation thereto. 

ARTICLE 36. To see if the Town will vole to instruct and authorize the 
Selectmen to remove the water pump located near the Quessey School 
on School Street, West Chelmsford ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 37. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of Four Thousand Dollars, or some other sum, for the purpose of 
aligning, grading and surfacing Stedman Street from Chelmsford Street 
to the houndary line on said street, hetween Chelmsford and Lowell ; or 
act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 38. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of Twelve Hundred Dollars, or some other sum, for the purpose 
of purchasing an automobile truck and the equipment incident there- 
to for use in the Fire Department ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 39. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of Two Thousand Dollars or some other sum, for the purpose 
of installing new lavatories in the new school building on Princeton 
Street ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 40. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of Seven Hundred and Ninety-Three Dollars and Ninety-Five 
Cents ($793.95) to pay the County of Middlesex, as required by law, 
the Town's share of the net cost of the care, maintenance and repair 
of the Middlesex County Tuberculosis Hospital, and for the Town's 
share of the expense under the provisions of Chapter 331 of the Acts 
of 1933, which provides for the settlement of certain claims of the 
Commonwealth against the Middlesex County Tuberculosis Hospital 
District, including interest or discount on temporary notes issued there- 
for, as assessed in accordance with the Provisions of Chapter 111 of 
the General Laws and Acts in amendment thereof and in addition there- 
to, or take any action in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 41. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Assessors 
to use a certain amount of free cash to be applied in computing the 1934 
Tax Rate with the permission of the State Tax Commissioner ; or act 
in relation thereto. 

AND YOU ARE DIRECTED to serve this Warrant by posting at- 
tested copies thereof at the Post Offices in the Centre of the Town, South 
Chelmsford, North Chelmsford, and West Chelmsford, and at the School- 
house, East Chelmsford, and the Golden Cove Schoolhouse, Westlands, 
seven days at least he fore the time appointed for holding the First meeting 
aforesaid. 

HEREOF FAIL NOT, and make return of this Warrant, with your 
doings thereon to the Town Clerk, at the time and place of holding this 
meeting aforesaid. 

40 



Given under our hands this 25th day of January in the year of our 
Lord, nineteen hundred and thirty-four. 

JAMES A. GRANT, 
FRANK J. LUPIEN, 
STEWART MacKAY, 

Selectmen of Chelmsford. 



RETURN 

Chelmsford, Mass., January 27, 1934. 



Middlesex ss. 



PURSUANT TO THE WITHIN WARRANT, I have notified and 
warned the inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford by posting up attested 
copies of the same at the following places, viz : Post Office, Chelmsford 
Centre; Post Office, North Chelmsford; Post Office, West Chelmsford; 
Schoolhouse, East Chelmsford; Post Office, South Chelmsford; and at the 
Golden Cove Schoolhouse, Westlands, seven days before the date hereof, 
as within directed. 

JOHN J. BUCHANAN, 

Constable of Chelmsford 



41 



P-5 


P-6 


Total 


72 


281 


1697 


23 


54 


642 



63 


79 


838 


29 


251 


1448 


3 


5 


53 



ELECTION OF OFFICERS 

FEBRUARY 5, 1934 

Moderator for One Year I'-l P-2 P-3 P-4 

Walter i'erham i 597 506 75 166 

Blanks 161 287 23 94 

Total 758 793 98 260 95 335 2339 

Selectman for Three Years — 

Roger W. Boyd 315 262 26 93 

James A. Grant 437 505 68 158 

Blanks 6 26 4 9 

Total 758 793 98 260 95 335 2339 

Member of Board of Public 
Welfare for Three Years — 

Roger W. Boyd 309 253 28 85 62 76 813 

James A. Grant 429 480 61 154 29 253 1406 

Blanks 20 60 9 21 4 6 120 

Total 758 793 98 260 95 335 2339 

Member of Board of Health 
for Three Years" — 

John R. Carney 176 243 34 48 

George A. McNulty 168 306 18 170 

J. Clark Osterhout 378 122 31 38 

Blanks 36 122 15 4 

Total 758 793 98 260 

Town Treasurer and Collector 
of Taxes for One Year — 

Harold C. Petterson 636 617 84 204 

Blanks 122 176 14 56 



26 


135 


662 


11 


87 


760 


48 


103 


720 


10 


10 


197 


95 


335 


2339 



Total 758 793 98 260 

Assessor for Three Years — 

Herbert C. Sweetser 645 566 78 193 

Blanks 113 227 20 67 

Total 758 793 98 260 

Constable for One Year — 

John J. Buchanan 595' 562 79 181 

Blanks 163 231 19 79 



Total 758 793 98 260 

42 



80 


293 


1914 


15 


42 


425 


95 


335 


2339 


77 


293 


1852 


18 


42 


487 


95 


335 


2339 


73 


282 


1772 


22 


53 


567 


95 


335 


2339 



54 


187 


55 


158 


1223 


41 


59 


35 


164 


1030 


3 


14 


5 


.13 


86 


98 


260 


95 


335 


2339 



School Committeeman for 
Three- Years — 

James P. Cassidy 358 411 

Cyril C. Trubey 368 363 

Blanks 32 19 

Total 758 793 



Trustee for Adams Library 
for Three Years — 

Luella H. S. Clark 562 270 53 130 71 236 1322 

Lottie L. Snow 508 280 82 139 63 232 1304 

Blanks ..: - 446 1036 61 251 56 202 2052 

Total 1516 1586 196 520 190 670 4678 



Trustee for Adams Library 
for One Year — Unexp. Term 

Frederick A. P. Fiske 584 458 

Blanks 174 335 

Total 758 793 

Tree Warden for One Year — 

Vincent P. Garvey 582 " 630 

Blanks 176 163 



74 


153 


■ 73 


270 


1612 


24 


107 


22 


65 


727 


98 


260 


95 


335 


2339 


80 


172 


71 


276 


1811 


18 


88 


24 


59 


528 


98 


260 


95 


335 


2339 



73 


157 


76 


264 


1610 


25 


103 


19 


71. 


729 


98 


260 


95 


335 


2339 



Total 758 793 

Cemetery Commissioner 
for Three Years — 

C. Wesley Lyons 582 458 

Blanks 176 335 

Total 758 793 

Park Commissioner for 
Three Years — 

Walter H. Merrill 589 465 

Blanks ." 169 328 

Total 758 793 98 260 95 335 2339 

Sinking Fund Commissioner 
for Three Years — 

Walter Perham 577 491 76 162 73 276 1655 

Blanks 181 302 22 98 22 59 684 



72 


160 


72 


270 


1628 


26 


100 


23 


65 


711 



Total 758 793 98 260 95 335 2339 

43 



Questions : 

No. 1 — Shall licenses be granted in this Town for the sale therein of all 
alcoholic beverages ( whiskey, rum. gin, malt beverages, wines and 
all other alcoholic beverage- 

P-l P-2 P-3 P-4 P-5 P-6 Total 

Yes 248 374 33 122 39 110 926 

No 372 213 45 59 44 173 906 

Blanks 138 206 20 79 12 52 507 

Total 758 793 98 260 95 335 2339 

Xo. 2 — Shall licenses be granted in this Town for the sale therein of wines 

and malt beverages ( wines and beer, ale and all other malt bever- 
ages I ? 

P-l P-2 P-3 P-4 P-5 P-6 Total 

Yes 293 401 42 127 43 140 1046 

No 320 164 36 51 38 139 748 

Blanks 145 228 20 82 14 56 545 

Total 758 793 98 260 95 335 2339 



44 



ANNUAL BUSINESS MEETING 

FEBRUARY 12, 1934 

At a legal meeting of the Inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford 
qualified to vote in Town affairs, held pursuant to warrant duly posted, 
said meeting held in the Upper Town Hall at Chelmsford Centre on Feb- 
ruary 12, 1934, at 10 A. M. Moderator Walter Perham called the meeting 
to order and requested Town Clerk Harold C. Petterson to read the War- 
rant, after the Warrant was partially read John C. Monahan moved that the 
further reading of the Warrant be waived, and it was so voted. 
Under Article One : 

It was voted to accept the Town Report as printed, with the following 
amendments : That the name of James A. Grant be inserted under the head 
of Selectmen and Board of Public Welfare in place of Herbert C. Sweetser ; 
and that the sum of $150.00 be inserted under Charities and Soldiers' Bene- 
fits instead of the sum of $1500.00. 

The report of the Committee appointed to make recommendations as to 
the advisability of improving the Common at North Chelmsford was made 
by Stewart MacKay, Chairman of this Committee. The report was as fol- 
lows : 

Report of the Committee on Improving North Common 

The Committee, after careful study of the general condition and location 
of the North Common, decided that the general, appearance would be im- 
proved by the removal of the fence and posts. Also that owing to the storm 
last summer the large oak tree on the Common was so badly wrecked that 
only the tall stump was left, so that it would be necessary to remove it. It 
was also decided to put stone curbing around the sidewalk, and as the grade 
was low to raise the grade, particularly on the south section. The question 
of the monument was then considered. Post 313 American Legion was in 
favor of the relocation to the southerly or broad end of the triangle. At 
first the Committee was inclined to look favorably on this proposition, but 
second thought brought out the fact that in this location the size of the 
monument was such that it would not show to as good advantage as in its 
present location, so that this idea was then dropped and it was decided to 
make its present location more attractive by putting a bubbler fountain at 
the peak of the Common, cementing a section across the end and run a three- 
foot concrete walk into and around the monument, shrubbery and flower 
beds nearby to complete arrangement. The lower section to be laid out with 
large flower beds, and if possible secure a piece of World War artillery to 
'be located in a central position in the wide section of the Common. The 
C. W. A. projects made it possible to save the Town at least half of the 
expense. We went ahead with this work, and at the present time the stump 
has been removed, all of the curbing except a small piece at northerly end is 
in place, the old loam stripped off, the rough grade established, and most of 

45 



the old loam put back, leaving the finished grade to be completed, more loam 
being required to complete the grade, and the seeding, walks, bubbler and 
shrubbery to be put in. 

A.NCEL Taylor Fred L. Fletcher 

Stewart MacKay Michael Welch 

Dr. F. E. Yarney Walter H. Merrill 
Gkorge E. Gagxox 

Under Article Two : 

On a motion made by John C. Monahan it was voted to lay this article 
on the table until after the noon recess. 

Under Article Three : 

On a motion made by James A. Grant it was voted to authorize the 
Selectmen to act as its agent in any suit or suits which may arise during the 
current year ; also in such other matters as may arise requiring, in their 
judgment the action of such agent, and to employ counsel therefor. 

Under Article Four : 

On a motion made by Frank J. Lupien it was voted that the Treasurer 
be and he hereby is authorized and empowered to borrow money with the 
approval of the Board of Selectmen from time to time in anticipation of the 
revenue of the financial year beginning Januray 1. 1934. and to issue a note 
or notes therefor payable within one year, any debt or debts incurred under 
this vote to be paid from revenue of such financial year. 

Under Article Five : 

On a motion made by Stewart MacKay it was voted that the Town raise 
and appropriate Two Thousand Dollars ($2000.00) to be used as a Reserve 
Fund at the discretion of the Finance Committee as provided in General 
Laws. Chapter 40, Section 6. 

Under Article Six : 

On a motion made by Tames A. Grant it was voted to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $1,636.51 for the purpose of paying unpaid bills for the 
year 1933. 

Under Article Seven : 

On a motion made by James A. Grant it was voted to accept Sylvan 
Ave. as laid out by the Selectmen as shown by their report and plan duly 
filed in the office of the Town Clerk. 

Under Article Eight : 

On a motion made by James A. Grant it was voted to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of One Hundred Dollars for the purpose of repairing Sylvan 
Ave. 

Under Article Nine : 

On a motion made by James A. Grant it was voted to accept Jensen 
Street as laid out by the Selectmen as shown by their report and plan duly 
filed in the office of the Town Clerk. 

46 



Under Article Ten : 

On a motion made by James A. Grant it was voted to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of Two Hundred Dollars for the purpose of repairing Jensen 
Street. 

Under Article Eleven : 

On a motion made by James A. Grant it was voted to accept Linwood 
Street as laid out by the Selectmen as shown by their report and plan duly 
filed in the office of the Town Clerk. 

Under Article Twelve : 

On a motion made by James A. Grant it was voted to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of One Hundred Dollars for the purpose of repairing Lin- 
wood Street. 

Under Article Thirteen : 

On a motion made by James A. Grant it was voted to accept Dunston 
Street as laid out by the Selectmen as shown by their report and plan duly 
filed in the office of the Town Clerk. 

Under Article Fourteen : 

On a motion made by James A. Grant it was voted to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of Two Hundred Dollars for the purpose of repairing 
Dunston Street. 

Under Article Fifteen : 

On a motion made by Stewart MacKay it was voted to accept Twist 
Road as laid out by the Selectmen as shown by their report and plan duly 
filed in the office of the Town Clerk. 

Under Article Sixteen : 

On a motion made by Stewart MacKay, it was voted to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Two Hundred Dollars for the purpose of repair- 
ing Twist Road. 

Under Article Seventeen : 

On a motion made by Harry L. Shedd, it was voted to raise and 
appropriate the sum of One Hundred Dollars, for the purpose of defray- 
ing the salary of the Fish and Game Warden. 

Under Article Eighteen : 

On a motion made by John C. Monahan, in regard to the purchase 
of an automobile for the Forest Fire Department, it was voted that this 
matter be laid over until the next Annual Town Meeting. 

Under Article Nineteen : 

On a motion made by Frank J. Lupien, it was voted to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Twenty-Five Dollars for the purpose of paying 
a claim for land seized from John J. Gallagher. 

Under Article Twenty : 

On a motion made by Frank J. Lupien, it was voted to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Twenty-Five Dollars for the purpose of settling 
property and personal injury claims of William H. Davis. 

47 



Under Article Twenty-One: 

On a motion made by John C. Monahan, in regard to band concerts 
it was voted to dismiss this Article. 

Under Article Twenty-Two : 

On a motion made by Harold C. Petterson. it was voted that the 
Town request the Department of Corporations and Taxation, Division 
of Accounts, to make an audit of the Town of Chelmsford accounts at 
their convenience, during the year 1934, and that the Town Clerk be 
instructed to notify said department of such vote. 

Under Article Twenty-Three : 

On a motion made by Stewart MacKay, it was voted to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Four Thousand Dollars for the purpose of recon- 
structing Middlesex Street, provided that the Commonwealth and the 
County of Middlesex each contribute a like amount. 

Under Article Twenty-Four : 

On a motion made by James A. Grant, it was voted to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Four Thousand Dollars for the purpose of recon- 
structing the North Road, provided that the Commonwealth and the County 
of Middlesex each contribute a like amount for such work. 

Under Article Twenty-Six : 

On a motion made by Frank J. Lupien, it was voted to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Four Hundred Thirty-Six Dollars for the purpose 
of satisfying a finding to the Superior Court in the matter of the suit 
for land damages filed by Daniel V. Sullivan and others. 

Under Article Twenty-Seven : 

On a motion made by .Stewart MacKay. it was voted to raise and 
appropriate the sum of One Hundred Thirty-Three Dollars and Ninety- 
Eight Cents for the purpose of satisfying a verdict of the Superior Court 
in the matter of the suit for land damages filed by Afanuel Mello. 

Under Article Twenty-Eight : 

On a motion made by James A. Grant, it was voted to raise and 
appropriate the sum of One Hundred Thirty-Six Dollars and Thirty- 
Eight Cents for the purpose of supplying a deficiency in the Old Westford 
Road Account. 

Under Article Twenty-Nine: 

On a motion made by Stewart MacKay, it was voted to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Six Hundred and Seventy-Five Dollars for the 
purpose of grading, seeding and the installation of a drinking fountain 
and otherwise embellishing the Common at the North \ illage. 

Under Article Thirty : 

On a motion made by Stewart MacKay. to appropriate the sum of 
Six Hundred Eighty Dollars for the purpose of purchasing seats and 
furniture at the Town Hall, North Village, this motion was lost. After 
the noon recess it was voted to reconsider this article and on a motion 
by Stewart MacKay it was voted to raise and appropriate the sum of 

48 



Six Hundred Eighty Dollars for the purpose of purchasing seats and 
furniture for use at the Town Hall at the North Village. 

Under Article Thirty-One : 

On a motion made by Harold C. Petterson that the Town vote to 
change the date of the Annual Town Meeting from the first Monday in 
February to the first Monday in March the same to take effect in the 
year 1935, this motion was amended by Town Counsel John H. Valen- 
tine, and it was voted to lay this article on the table until after the 
noon recess, for the purpose of investigating the legality of this motion. 
After the noon recess, on a motion made by Harold C. Petterson, it was 
voted that the Town change the date of the Annual Town Meeting from 
the First Monday in February to the First Monday in March, the same to 
take effect in the year 1935. 

Under Article Thirty -Two : 

On a motion made by Frank J. Uupien, it was voted to raise and 
appropriate the sum of One Thousand Dollars for the purpose of fore- 
closing Tax Titles and selling land of low value as set forth in the 
General Laws. 

Under Article Thirty-Three : 

On a motion made by Frank J. Lupien, it was voted to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Five Thousand Four Hundred and Forty-Six 
Dollars and Eighty-Six Cents for the purpose of supplying a deficiency 
in the Outside Aid and Old Age Assistance Accounts. 

At this point of the meeting it was voted to hold a noon recess from 
12 M. to 1 P. M. 

The first article to be considered after the noon recess was Article 
2, and it was voted to raise and appropriate the following sums to defray 
Town charges for the current year : 

General Government : 

Modertor's Salary $ 10.00 

Selectmen Salaries as follows : 

Chairman 252.00 

Members 423.00 

Administration Expenses 180.00 

Town Clerk, Salary 180.00 

Town Clerk, Expense 100.00 

Town Accountant, Salary ..... 1,620.00 

Town Accountant, Expense 100.00 

Collector and Treasurer, Salary 1,800.00 

Collector and Treasurer, Expense 1,025.00 

Collector and Treasurer, Bond 480.00 

Assessors' Salaries 1,900.00 

Assessors' Expense — 600.00 

Town Counsel Salary 280.00 

Finance Committee Expense ~~ ■ 20 00 

Registrars' Salaries and Expense 600.00 

49 



Election Officers' Salaries and Expense 600.00 

Public Buildings Janitors' Salaries- 855.00 

Public Buildings, Euel, Light. Water 1,000.00 

Public Buildings Other Expense 400.00 

Protection of Persons and Property : 

Police Department $ 8,600.00 

Fire Dept. Adminisrtation 3,765.00 

Fire Dept. Maintenance 3,700.00 

Fire Dept. Labor and Expense at Fires 600. 00 

Hydrant Service, Centre 500.00 

Hydrant Service, North 500.00 

Hydrant Sen-ice. West 20.00 

Sealer of Weights and Aleasures 175.00 

Moth Department 1,300.00 

Tree Warden 150.00 

Forest Fire Department 900.00 

Health and Sanitation : 

Board of Health Salaries $ 630.00 

Board of Health Agent's Salary 315.00 

Board of Health Aid 1,500.00 

Board of Health Maintenance 200.00 

Board of Health Meat Inspector's Salary 607.00 

Board of Health Milk Inspector's Salary 315.00 

Board of Health Physician's Salary 90.00 

Board of Health Care of Dumps 75.00 

Highways : 

Highway Superintendent's Salary $ 1,800.00 

Highway General 12,000.06 

Highway Truck Maintenance '. 2,000.00 

Highway Road Binder 7,00000 

Highway Chapter 90 Work 2,500.00 

Highway Street Lighting 11,000.00 



$ 12,425.00 



$ 20,210.00 



$ 3.732.0U 



$ 36.300.00 



Public Welfare: 

Board of Public Welfare Salaries : 

Chairman $ 112.50 

Members 180.00 

Board of Public Welfare Maintenance 300.00 

Board of Public Welfare Investigator Salary.. 1,300.00 

Old Age Assistance and Outside Poor 23,000.00 

Infirmary Superintendent's Salary 81000 

Infirmary Expense 2,300.00 

Infirmary Repairs 100.00 



50 



Soldiers' Relief 1,000.00 

Military Aid 250.00 

State Aid : 200.00 

$29,552.50 

School Department : 

Administration $ 3,810.00 

Instruction 65,500.00 

Operation and Maintenance 16,350.00 

Auxiliary Agencies 10,415.00 

New Equipment 300.00 

$ 96,375.00 

Vocational School : 
Tuition, Plus Dog Tax $ 1,200.00 

$ 1,200.00 

Libraries : 

Adams Library $ 2,000.00 

North Chelmsford Library 1,200.00 

$ 3,200.00 

Cemeteries : 

Commissioners' Salaries $ 105.00 

Forefathers' Cemetery 400.00 

Hart Pond Cemetery 400.00 

Pine Ridge Cemetery 400.00 

Riverside Cemetery 400.00 * 

West Chelmsford Cemetery 400.00 

Fairview Cemetery 250.00 

$ 2,355.00 

Recreation and Unclassified : 

Parks $ 1,000.00 

Memorial Day, Chelmsford Centre 150.00 

Memorial Day, North Chelmsford 150.00 

Town Clock 30.00 

Public Buildings Insurance 800.00 

Treasurer's Insurance Sinking Fund Bond 40.00 

Animal Inspector 180.00 

Constables 60.00 

Plumbing Inspector 200.00 

Town Reports 774.00 

$ 3,384.00 

Grand Total of Budget $208,733.50 

Under Article Thirty-Four : 

On a motion made by Frank J. Lupien, it was voted to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Three Thousand Dollars for the purpose of paying 
for tools, materials, equipment purchased and to be purchased to continue 
work under the Civil Works Administration projects. 

51 



Under Article Thirty-Five : 

On a motion made by Harold C. Petterson, it was voted to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Fifty Dollars for the purpose of re-imbursing 
Frank J. Lupien, local Civil Works Administrator for expenses incurred 
and paid for in the year 1933. 

Under Article Thirty-Six : 

On a motion made by Stewart MacKay, it was voted to authorize the 
Selectmen to remove the water pump located near the Quessy School on 
School Street, West Chelmsford. 

Under Article Thirty-Seven: 

On a motion made by John C. Monahan, in regard to appropriating 
Four Thousand Dollars for grading Stedman Street, it was voted to dis- 
miss this article. 

Under Article Thirty-Eight : 

On a motion made by Harry U. Shedd, it was voted to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Twelve Hundred Dollars for the purpose of 
purchasing an automobile truck and the equipment incident thereto for use 
in the Fire Department. 

Under Article Thirty-Nine : 

On a motion made by James P. Cassidy, it was voted to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Seventeen Hundred Dollars to be used for the 
purpose of installing new lavatories in the New School Building at Prince- 
ton Street. 

Under Article Forty : 

On a motion made by James A. Grant, it was voted to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Seven Hundred Ninety-Three Dollars and Ninety- 
Five Cents, to pay the County of Middlesex, as required by law, the 
Town's share of the net cost of the care, maintenance and repair of the 
Middlesex County Tuberculosis Hospital and for the Town's share of the 
expense under the provision of Chapter 331 of the Acts of 1933, which 
provides for the settlement of certain claims of the Commonwealth against 
the Middlesex County Tuberculosis Hospital District, including interest 
or discount on temporary notes issued therefor, as assessed in accordance 
with the provision of Chapter 111 of the General Laws and Acts in 
amendment thereof in addition thereto. 

Under Article Forty-One : 

On a motion made by Harold C. Petterson, it was voted to authorize 
the Board of Assessors to use the sum of Twenty Thousand Dollars 
($20,000.00) or whatever sum that the Tax Commissioner approves as free 
cash to be applied in computing the tax rate for the year 1934. 

On a motion made by James A. Grant, it was voted to adjourn this 
meeting at 3 P. M. 

WALTER PERHAM HAROLD C PETTERSON 

Moderator Town Clerk 



52 



WARRANT FOR PARTY PRIMARY 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
Middlesex, ss. 

To John J. Buchanan, a Constable of the Town of Chelmsford. 

GREETING : 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to notify 
and warn the inhabitants of said Town who are qualified to vote in 
Primaries to meet in their several polling places, viz : 

Precinct One, Town Hall, Chelmsford Centre. 

Precinct Two, Town Hall, North Chelmsford. 

Precinct Three, Fire House, West Chelmsford. 

Precinct Four, Schoolhouse, East Chelmsford. 

Precinct Five, Liberty Hall, South Chelmsford. 

Precinct Six, Golden Cove Schoolhouse, Westlands. 

On Tuesday, the Twenty-fourth day of April, 1934, at 12 o'clock noon, 
for the following purposes : 

To bring in their votes to the Primary Officers for the Election of 
Candidates of Political Parties for the following offices : 

DISTRICT MEMBER OF STATE COMMITTEE, for each of 
the political parties for the 8th Senatorial District. 

THIRTY MEMBERS OF THE DEMOCRATIC TOWN 
COMMITTEE. 

THIRTY MEMBERS OF THE REPUBLICAN TOWN COM- 
MITTEE. 

ONE DELEGATE TO THE STATE CONVENTION OF THE 
DEMOCRATIC PARTY. 

ONE DELEGATE TO THE STATE CONVENTION OF THE 
REPUBLICAN PARTY. 

All the above candidates are to be voted for upon one ballot. 

The polls will be open from 12 o'clock noon to 8 P. M. 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting attested copies 
thereof seven days at least before the time of said meeting as directed by 
vote of the town. 

53 



HEREOF FAIL NOT and make return of this warrant with your 
doings thereon at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given under cur hands this fourteenth day of April, A D. 1934. 

FRANK J. LUPIEN, 
STEWART MacKAY, 

JAMES A. GRANT, 

Selectmen of Chelmsford. 



RETURN 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chelmsford, Mass., April 16, 1934. 

Middlesex, ss. 

I have served the foregoing Warrant by posting attested copies 
thereof more than seven days before the time of said meeting as directed 
by vote of the Town and by the foregoing order. 

JOHN J. BUCHANAN, 

Constable of Chelmsford, Mass. 



54 



PRIMARY ELECTION 
April 24, 1934 

REPUBLICAN 



Candidate P-l P-2 
Member of State Committee : 

Ezra F. Chase of Lowell 8 15 

Helen G. Eversole of Groton... . 229 40 

Blanks 4 3 

Total 241 58 

Delegate to State Convention : 

Royal Shawcross 224 51 

Blanks 17 7 

Total 241 58 

Town Committee : 

Edna I. Ballinger... 190 53 

Royal Shawcross 206 53 

Ethel Booth 194 53 

Elmer R. Hill 208 53 

Esther R. Woodward 201 53 

Alfred J. Allard 193 53 

Hester L. Emerson 203 53 

Herbert G. Reid 198 53 

John H. Valentine 197 53 

Luther W. Faulkner 212 53 

George F. Cutler 190 53 

Sidney E. Dupee 195 53 

Elizabeth M. Calder 194 53 

Roy A. Clough 200 53 

Charles R. Brigham 195 53 

James A. Grant 207 53 

Edna E. Briggs 194 53 

Robert W. Barris 191 53 

Walter Perham 202 53 

Edward L. Monahan 195 53 

Harold C. Petterson 204 53 

Octave L'Herault 188 53 

Jennie Kneeland 187 53 

Jennie S. Brown 190 53 

Donald C. Knapp 192 53 

Harold W. Stewart 196 53 

John W. Carruthers 199 53 



P-3 P-4 P-5 P-6 Total 



15 



15 




15 



6 

25 

3 



13 34 



13 




26 



13 



43 

310 

15 



333 

35 



34 368 



14 


6 


8 


26 


297 


15 


5 


11 


29 


319 


14 


5 


8 


27 


301 


15 


5 


11 


28 


320 


14 


5 


8 


28 


309 


15 


5 


7 


26 


299 


14 


6 


9 


27 


312 


15 


6 


10 


28 


310 


15 


5 


■9 


28 


307 


15 


5 


8 


29 


322 


15 


5 


8 


27 


298 


15 


5 


11 


27 


306 


14 


5 


10 


27 


303 


15 


5 


8 


.27 


308 


15 


6 


9 


30 


308 


15 


5 


11 


30 


321 


14 


5 


8 


29 


303 


15 


6 


9 


27 


301 


15 


6 


10 


28 


314 


15 


6 


9 


25 


303 


15 


5 


12 


31 


320 


15 


5 


8 


25 


294 


14 


5 


8 


27 


294 


14 


5 


8 


28 


298 


15 


5 


8 


30 


303 


15 


6 


8 


27 


305 


15 


5 


10 


27 


309 



55 



Candidate 

H. Chadburne Ward 

Walter Jewett 

Harold Clayton 11 

Blanks 1496 

Total 7230 



p-1 


P-2 


p-3 


P-4 


P-5 


P-6 


Total 


197 


53 


15 


5 


10 


27 


307 


205 


53 


15 


6 


10 


31 


320 


11 





15 





11 


2 


39 


1496 


203 


8 


56 


115 


212 


2090 



1740 450 210 390 1020 11040 



DEMOCRATIC 

Candidate P-1 P-2 P-3 
State Committee : 

Andrew E. Barrett of Lowell.... 3 10 

James J. Bruin of Lowell 18 22 2 

Cornelius F. Cronin of Lowell.. 5 14 

Blanks 6 7 

Total 32 44 2 

Delegate to State Convention : 

John J. Kelley, Gorham St 5 14 

Karl M. Perham, Dalton Rd. .. 26 28 2 

Blanks 1 2 

Total 32 44 2 

Town Committee : 

Frank J. Garvey :.... 30 44 2 

Karl M. Perham 29 44 2 

Daniel E. Haley 30 44 2 

William H. Quigley 28 44 2 

John E. Harrington 28 44 2 

George A. McNulty 30 44 2 

John J. Meagher 29 44 2 

James J. Savage 29 44 2 

John E. O'Sullivan 27 44 2 

John Talty 28 44 2 

Gertrude M. Fallon 27 44 2 

Margaret H. Sullivan 29 44 2 

Ruth M. Conlin 29 44 2 

John A. Andrews 28 44 2 

Cleveland K. Nobles 28 44 2 

Florrie Walton 28 44 2 

George E. Pyne 28 44 2 

Patrick F. Sullivan 28 44 2 

Henry McKennedy 30 44 2 

James J. McCluskey 27 44 2 

P. Joseph McHugh 27 44 2 



M 


P-5 


P-6 


Total 


4 


1 





9 


30 





6 


78 


6 








25 


7 





1 


21 



47 



47 



133 



18 








37 


28 


1 


7 


92 


1 


o- 





4 



133 



32 


1 


7 


116 


39 


1 


7 


122 


33 


1 


7 


117 


31 


1 


7 


113 


33 


1 


7 


115 


39 


1 


7 


123 


37 


1 


7 


120 


31 


1 


7 


114 


31 


1 


7 


112 


30 


1 


7 


112 


32 


1 


7 


113 


30 


1 


7 


113 


31 


1 


7 


114 


29 


1 


7 


111 


29 


1 


7 


111 


29 


1 


7 


111 


30 


1 


7 


112 


32 


1 


7 


114 


35 


1 


7 


110 


30 


1 


7 


111 


30 


1 


7 


111 



56 



Candidate 

Rosa V. Quinn 

George Sullivan 

John E. Boyle 

M. Edward Riney 

George YVaite 

Blanks 306 

Total 960 



p-1 


P-2 


P-3 


P-4 P 


-5 P-6 


Total 


30 


44 


2 


31 


1 7 


115 


7 


44 


2 


2 


1 5 


61 


7 


44 


2 


3 


1 4 


61 


6 


44 


2 


2 


1 4 


59 


7 


44 


2 


2 


1 4 


60 


306 


176 


8 


697 


4 39 


1230 



1320 60 1410 30 210 3990 



HAROLD C. PETTERSON. 

Town Clerk. 



57 



WARRANT FOR SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

At Upper Town Hall, Chelmsford Centre, 

Friday Evening, June 29, 1934 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Middlesex, ss. 

To John J. Buchanan, a Constable of Chelmsford. 
GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth as aforesaid you are hereby 
required to notify and warn the legal voters of said Chelmsford to meet 
in the Upper Town Hall at Chelmsford Centre on Friday the Twenty- 
ninth day of June, 1934, at eight o'clock in the evening then and there 
to act on the following articles, viz : 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of Five Thousand Dollars or some other sum, to be expended 
on highways ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of Eight Hundred Dollars or some other sum to be used in the 
maintenance of public halls ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of Twenty-Two Hundred and Eighty-Five Dollars or some 
other sum for the purpose of purchasing a new automobile truck ; or 
act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of Twenty-Seven Hundred Dollars, or some other sum for 
the purpose of purchasing a power grader for use in the highway 
department ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of Twenty-Five Hundred Dollars for the purpose of defray- 
ing the expense of purchasing materials, expense of trucking and 
other necessary expenditures to continue the projects under the Emer- 
genecy Relief Administration ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of Seventy-Eight Dollars, or some other sum for the purpose 
of defraying the cost of an electric traffic light situated at the junction 
of the North Road and Princeton Boulevard; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to accept the gift of a 
strip of land from Thomas F. Reilly situated between Crystal Lake 
so-called and land owned by the Town of Chelmsford in North 
Chelmsford ; or act in relation thereto. 

58 



ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the School 
Committee to sell by a good and sufficient bill of sale the garage build- 
ing and contents therein located on the Southerly side of Washington 
Street in the North Village; or act in relation thereto. 

AND YOU ARE DIRECTED to serve this Warrant by posting- 
attested copies thereof at the Post Offices in the Centre of the Town, South 
Chelmsford, North Chelmsford, and at West Chelmsford and at the 
Schoolhouse, East Chelmsford, and at the Golden Cove Schoolhouse, West- 
lands, seven days at least before the time appointed for holding the meet- 
ing aforesaid. 

HEREOF FAIL NOT and make return of this Warrant with your 
doings thereon, to the Town Clerk, at the time and place of holding the 
meeting aforesaid. 

Given under our hands this Twentieth day of June in the year of 'our 
Lord, nineteen hundred and thirty-four. 

FRANK J. LUPIEN, 

JAMES A. GRANT, 
STEWART MacKAY, 

Selectmen of Chelmsford. 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

June 21, 1934. 
Middlesex, ss. 

PURSUANT TO THE WITHIN WARRANT, I have notified and 
warned the inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford by posting up attested 
copies of the same at the Post Offices in the Centre of the Town, South 
Chelmsford, North Chelmsford, West Chemsford and at the Schoolhouse, 
East Chelmsford and at the Golden Cove Schoolhouse, Westlands, seven days 
before the date hereof as within directed. 

JOHN J. BUCHANAN, 

Constable of Chelmsford. 



59 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
June 29, 1934 



At a legal meeting of the inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford, 
qualified to vote in Town affairs, held in the Upper Town Hall at Chelms- 
ford Centre on June 29, 1934, at eight o"clock in the evening, the following 
business was transacted, to wit : 

The meeting was called to order by Moderator Walter Perham and the 
Town Clerk was requested to read the Warrant. After the Warrant was 
partly read on a motion made by J. Carroll Monahan it was voted to waive 
the further reading of the Warrant. 

Under Article One : 

On a motion made by Stewart MacKay, it was voted to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Five Thousand Dollars to be expended for highway 
purposes. 

Under Article Two : 

On a motion made by James A. Grant it was voted to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Eight Hundred Dollars to be used for public halls 
maintenance. 

Under Article Three : 

On a motion made by James A. Grant it was voted to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Twenty-Two Hundred and Eighty-Five Dollars 
for the purpose of purchasing an automobile truck, and the Board of 
Selectmen is hereby authorized and empowered to make such a contract 
of purchase in behalf of the Town. 

Under Article Four : 

On a motion made by Frank J. Lupien it was voted to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Twenty-Seven Hundred Dollars for the purpose of 
purchasing a power grader, and the Board of Selectmen is hereby author- 
ized and empowered to make such a contract of purchase in behalf of the 
Town. 

Under Article Five : 

On a motion made by Frank J. Lupien it was voted to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of Twenty-Five Hundred Dollars for the purpose of purchas- 
ing materials, to defray the cost of transportation and other necessary 
expenditures to continue the work under the Emergency Relief Admin- 
istration projects. Said money to be expended under the direction of the 
Board of Selectmen. 

Under Article Six : 

On a motion made by Stewart MacKay it was voted to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Seventy-Eight Dollars for the purpose of defray- 
ing the cost of an electric traffic light situated at the junction of the 
North Road and the Princeton Boulevard. 

60 



Under Article Seven : 

On a motion made by Stewart MacKay it was voted to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to accept in behalf of the inhabitants of Chelms- 
ford, and without expense to the aforesaid inhabitants other than the 
expense of drawing up a deed and recording the same conveying title 
from Thomas F. Reilly of New Haven, Conn., to the inhabitants of 
Chelmsford, of a certain parcel of land situated in that part of Chelms- 
ford called North Chelmsford and bounded and described as follows : 

Westerly by Crystal Lake so-called. 
Southerly by the southerly line of Adams Street. 
Easterly by land owned by the inhabitants of Chelmsford. 
Northerly by other land of Thomas F. Reilly. 

Under Article Eight : 

On a motion made by James P. Cassidy, it was voted to authorize 
the School Committee to sell, for the purpose of removing from Town 
owned land the garage building and contents now located on the school 
grounds on the southerly side of Washington Street in the northerly part of 
Chelmsford, at private sale or public auction for such sum as the said Com- 
mittee may deem sufficient, and that the said Committee be authorized to 
execute a good and sufficient conveyance of the said property. 

Voted to adjourn this meeting at 9.20 P. M. 

WALTER PERHAM HAROLD C. PETTERSON 

Moderator Town Clerk 



61 



WARRANT FOR STATE PRIMARY 
Thursday, the Twentieth Day of September, 1934 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
Middlesex, ss. 

To John J. Buchanan, a Constable of the Town of Chelmsford. 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby requested to notify 
and warn the inhabitants of said Town who are qualified to vote in Primar- 
ies to meet in their several polling places, viz. : 

Precinct 1, Town Hall, Chelmsford Centre. 

Precinct 2, Town Hall, North Chelmsford. 

Precinct 3, Historical Hall, West Chelmsford. 

Precinct 4, School House, East Chelmsford. 

Precinct 5, Liberty Hall, South Chelmsford. 

Precinct 6, Golden Cove School House, Westlands. 

On Thursday, the Twentieth day of September, 1934, at 12 o'clock noon 
for the following purposes : 

To bring in their votes to the Primary Offices for the nomination of 
candidates of Political Parties for the following offices: 

Governor for this Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

Lieutenant Governor for this Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

Secretary of the Commonwealth for this Commonwealth of Massa- 
chusetts. 

Treasurer and Receiver General for this Commonwealth of Massa- 
chusetts. 

Auditor of the Commonwealth for this Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

Attorney General for this Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

Senator in Congress for this Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

Representative in Congress Fifth Congressional District. 

Councillor Sixth Councillor District. 

Senator Eighth Senatorial District. 

One Representative in General Court Eleventh Representative District. 

District Attorney Middlesex County. 

Clerk of Courts Middlesex County. 

62 



Register of Deeds Northern Middlesex District. 

One County Commissioner Middlesex County. 

Two Associate County Commissioners Middlesex County. 

VACANCIES 

Sheriff Middlesex County (to fill vacancy). 

The polls will be open from 12 o'clock noon to 8 P. M. 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting attested copies 
thereof seven days at least before the time of said meeting as directed by 
vote of the Town. 

Hereof fail not and make return of this Warrant with your doings 
thereon at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given under our hands this twelfth day of September, A. D. 1934. 

STEWART MacKAY, 
JAMES A. GRANT, 
FRANK J. LUPIEN, 

Selectmen of Chelmsford. 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Middlesex, ss. 

Pursuant to the within Warrant, 1 have notified and warned the inhabi- 
tant* of the Town of Chelmsford by posting up attested copies of the same 
and at the following places, viz. : 

Chelmsford Centre Post Office. 
North Chelmsford Post Office. 
West Chelmsford Post Office. 
South Chelmsford Post Office. 
East Chelmsford School House, and at the 
Golden Cove School House, Westlands, 
seven days before the date hereof, as within directed. 

JOHN J. BUCHANAN, 

Constable of Chelmsford. 

STATE PRIMARIES 

September 20, 1934 

At a legal meeting of the inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford, quali- 
fied to vote in State Primaries, said meeting held pursuant to Warrant duly 
posted in six precincts in the Town of Chelmsford, the following candidates 
received the following number of votes set against their respective names, 
as follows : 

REPUBLICAN 

Governor: P-l P-2 P-3 P-4 P-5 P-6 Total 

Bacon 426 258 38 42 41 155 960 

Goodwin : 124 224 13 49 11 69 490 

Blanks 26 72 8 9 15 130 

Total 576 554 59 100 52 239 1580 

Lieutenant Governor : 

Haigis 511 394 44 76 49 209 1283 

Blanks 65 160 15 24 3 30 297 

Total 576 554 59 100 52 239 1580 

Secretary : 

Cook 464 387 48 77 47 205 1228 

Blanks 112 167 11 23 5 34 352 

Total 576 554 59 100 52 239 1580 

Treasurer : 

Dionne 364 265 34 39 31 129 862 

Vinson 106 113 13 38 13 71 354 

Blanks 106 176 12 23 8 39 364 

Total 576 554 59 100 52 239 1580 

64 



Candidate P-l P-2 P-3 P-4 P-5 P-6 Total 
Auditor : 

Pigeon 232 145 23 26 20 90 536 

Atherton 24 . 33 5 6 1 5 74 

Cook 235 204 20 49 24 107 639 

Rich 8 19 2 3 2 7 41 

Blanks 77 . 153 9 16 5 30 290 

• Total 576 554 59 100 52 239 1580 

Attorney General : 

Warner 491 379 47 74 47 207 1245 

Blanks 85 175 12 26 5 32 335 

Total , 576 554 59 100 52 239 1580 

Senator in Congress: 

Washburn 471 359 47 73 43 191 1184 

Blanks • 105 195 12 27 9 48 396 

Total 576 554 59 100 52 239 1580 

Congressman 5th District : 

King 34 88 5 18 2 18 165 

Rogers 515 403 50 73 50 215 1306 

Blanks 27 63 4 9 6 109 

Total 576 554 59 100 52 239 1580 

Councillor 6th District : 

Bailey, Sr 79 73 11 10 13 30 216 

Balfour 14 31 1 1 7 54 

Burtnett 185 120 17 15 14 61 412 

Myers 160 , 171 18 58 10 101 518 

Blanks 138 159 12 17 14 40 380 

Total 576 554 59 100 52 239 1580 

Senator 8th Middlesex District : 

Dukeshire 21 20 1 12 8 62 

Heathcote 214 117 19 25 22 53 450 

Picard 11 48 1 5 14 79 

Stevens 280 269 34 47 28 153 811 

Blanks 50 100 4 11 2 11 178 

Total 576 554 59 100 52 239 1580 



65 



Candidate P-l P-2 P-3 P-4 P-5 P-6 Total 
Rep. in General Court : 

Gagnon 53 172 11 11 4 29 280 

Pfeiffer 29 12 3 15 2 15 76 

Towle 94 31 12 7 13 22 179 

Valentine 389 331 30 64 33 166 1013 

Blanks 11 8 3 3 7 32 

Total 576 554 59 100 52 239 1580 

Dist. Attorney North. Dis. : 

Bishop 489 360 47 77 47 199 1219 

Blanks 87 194 12 23 5 40 361 

Total 576 554 59 100 52 239 1580 

Clerk of Courts. Middlesex: 

Smith 465 344 47 70 44 189 1159 

Blanks Ill 210 12 30 8 50 421 

Total 576 554 59 100 52 239, 1580 

Register of Deeds, 
Middlesex Northern District: 

Montminy 131 120 13 36 12 43 355 

O'Sullivan 43 107 9 13 4 43 219 

Simpson 290 177 27 36 30 117 677 

Blanks 112 150 10 15 6 36 329 

Total 576 554 59 100 52 239 1580 

County Commiss., Middlesex : 

Adams 69 63 8 15 5 22 182 

Brown 64 113 7 24 8 23 239 

Collings 7 6 3 16 

Gilmore 26 21 4 3 1 12 67 

Griffith 6 6 10 5 18 

Jewett 331 225 30 42 34 150 812 

Blanks 73 120 10 15 4 24 246 

Total 576 554 59 100 52 239 1580 

Associate Commissioners, 
Middlesex County : 

Brodbine 37 39 7 2 16 101 

Donaldson 197 113 20 32 22 69 453 

Rogers 391 195 37 65 41 176 905 

Scott 92 98 9 18 6 55 278 

Blanks 435 663 52 78 33 162 1423 

Total 1152 1108 118 200 104 478 3160 

66 



Candidate P-l P-2 P-3 P-4 P-S P-6 Total 
Sheriff Middlesex Count}' : 

Amee 9 11 2 4 2 4 32 

Bates '. '. 4 7 1 3 15 

Brown 318 216 26 48 32 106 746 

Groombridge 10 1 

Justice 3 6 1 10 

Kidder 10 15 1 1 3 30 

McElroy 164 161 24 21 9 101 480 

Robart 12 17 7 1 3 40 

Rockwood 2 4 1 7 

Stone 3 12 1 2 1 3 22 

Walker 15 17 9 41 

Blanks 36 87 5 15 4 9 156 

Total 576 554 59 100 52 239 1580 



DEMOCRATIC 

Candidate P-l P-2 P-3 P-4 P-5 P-6 Total 
Governor : 

Cole 27 57 2 26 2 8 122 

Curley 36 70 7 49 4 17 183 

Goodwin 3 6 7 1 17 

Blanks 2 5 110 9 

Total 68 138 10 83 7 25 331 



Lieutenant Governor : 

Hurley 39 82 5 47 6 19 198 

Kelly 20 42 2 21 5 90 

Blanks 9 14 3 15 1 1 43 

Total 68 138 10 83 7 25 331 



Secretary : 

Santosuosso 17 46 2 21 3 11 100 

Blake 4 4 1 1 1 11 

Buckley 17 21 3 17 1 3 62 

Dugan 16 2 9 

O'Brien 9 15 1 10 1 36 

Riley 5 2 10 8 

Sullivan 7 16 1 14 5 43 

Blanks 13 25 3 16 1 4 62 

Total 68 138 10 83 7 25 331 

67 



Candidate l'-l P-2 P-3 P-4 P-5 P-6 Total 
Treasurer : 

Hurley 53 100 5 65 5 22 250 

Blanks 15 38 5 18 2 3 81 

Total 68 138 10 83 7 25 331 

Auditor : 

Buckley Z7 72 3 44 6 17 179 

\\ alsh 12 36 5 20 4 77 

Blanks 19 30 2 19 1 4 75 

Total 68 138 10 83 7 25 331 

Attorney General : 

Dever 25 55 3 21 5 11 120 

Boyle 7 14 2 19 4 46 

Chapman 14 5 10 

Sullivan 22 39 1 21 1 9 93 

Blanks 13 26 4 17 1 1 62 

Total 68 138 10 83 7 25 331 

Senator in Congress : 

Walsh 47 89 5 65 4 16 226 

Barry 12 25 3 4 2 6 52 

Donahoe 6 13 4 2 25 

Blanks 3 11 2 10 1 1 28 

Total 68 138 10 83 7 25 331 

Congressman, Fifth District : 

Halloran 10 17 1 14 2 5 49 

McLaughlin 6 5 3 11 1 26 

Morrissey 4 22 5 1 32 

O'Sullivan 39 66 4 40 3 17 169 

Blanks 9 28 2 13 1 2 55 

Total 68 138 10 83 7 25 331 

Councillor, Sixth District : 

Brennan 7 20 2 9 4 3 45 

Burke 23 19 3 18 5 68 

Fitzgerald, Jr 4 5 5 7 21 

Forrest 110 111 5 

Muldoon 1 7 1 5 1 15 

O'Brien 18 60 30 3 111 

Blanks 14 26 4 15 2 5 66 

Total 68 138 10 83 7 25 331 

68 



Candidate P-l P-2 P-3 P-4 P-5 P-6 Total 
Senator, 8th Middlesex Dist. : 

Keefe 23 41 1 21 2 12 100 

McCarty .' 27 58 4 42 3 10 144 

Roark 7 8 1 11 1 28 

Blanks 11 31 4 9 1 3 59 

Total 68 .138 10 83 7 25 331 



Representative 11th Mdlsx. : 

Kelley 38 61 4 55 2 19 179 

Kingsley 20 47 2 20 ' 3 2 94 

Blanks 10 30 4 8 2 4 58 

Total 68 138 10 83 7 25 331 

District Attorney, Northern Dist. : 

Bruin , 46 92 6 55 5 21 225 

Crowley 14 ' 20 2 18 3 57 

Daly 2 5 2 1 1 11 

Gavan 5 5 

Blanks 6 16 2 8 1 33 

Total 68 138 10 83 7 25 331 



Clerk of Courts, Middlesex : 

Brennan , 40 ' 74 4 48 5 18 189 

Ford -. 7 15 1 6 1 30 

Medeiros 2 8 1 6 1 1 19 

Blanks 19 41 4 23 1 5 93 

Total 68 138 10 83 7 25 331 

Register of Deeds, Mdlsx. North. : 

Moriarty 25 54 2 28 4 13 126 

Purcell 31 68 7 51 . 2 11 170 

Blanks 12 16 1 4 1 1 35 

Total 68 138 10 83 7 25 331 



County Commissioner, Middlesex : 

Brennan 29 63 5 37 2 16 152 

Donovan 16 34 2 20 2 3 77 

Stuart 7 6 13 

Blanks 23 34 3 20 3 6 89 

Total 68 138 10 83 7 25 331 

69 



Candidate P-l P-2 
Associate Commissioners, Mdlsx. : 

Brunelle 9 9 

Harley 29 30 

K-ing 22 32 

Murray 7 6 

Sweeney 11 11 

Blanks' 58 188 

Total 136 276 

Sheriff, Middlesex County: 

Brennan 6 9 

DeLuca 1 

Fox 6 13 

Griffin 12 24 

Kelleher 4 4 

Leahy 6 

Robart 10 18 

Ryan 3 5 

Walsh 9 35 

Blanks 18 23 

Total 68 138 



-3 


P-4 


P-5 


P-6 


Total 


1 


6 


1 


4 


30 


5 


30 


1 


12 


107 


5 


29 


5 


7 


100 





9 





4 


26 





12 





2 


36 


9 


80 


7 


21 


363 



20 166 



14 



50 662 






10 


1 


6 


32 


1 











2 


1 


16 


2 


4 


42 


4 


12 


2 


3 


57 














8 














6 





12 


1 


5 


46 





5 








13 


1 


12 





5 


62 


3 


16 


1 


2 


63 



10 83 



25 331 



HAROLD C. PETTERSON. 

Town Clerk. 



70 



WARRANT FOR STATE ELECTION 



November 6, 1934. 
Middlesex, ss. : 

To John J. Buchanan, a Constable of the Town of Chelmsford. 

GREETING : 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts you are hereby 
required to notify and warn the inhabitants of said Town who are qualified 
to vote in elections to meet in their several polling places, viz : 

Precinct One, Town Hall, Chelmsford Centre. 
Precinct Two, Town Hall, North Chelmsford. 
Precinct Three, Fire House, West Chelmsford. 
Precinct Four, Schoolhouse, East Chelmsford. 
Precinct Five, Liberty Hall, South Chelmsford. 
Precinct Six, Golden Cove Schoolhouse, Westlands. 

Tuesday, the sixth day of November, 1934, being the first Tuesday 
after the first Monday in said month, at eight o'clock A. M. for the follow- 
ing purposes : 

To bring in their votes for the following officers : 
Governor for this Commonwealth. 
Lieuteant Governor for this Commonwealth. 
Secretary for this Commonwealth. 
Treasurer for this Commonwealth. 
Auditor for this Commonwealth. 
Attorney General for this Commonwealth. 
Senator in Congress. 
Representative in Congress. 

One Representative for the General Court in the 11th Representative 
District. 

Councillor for the Sixth Councillor District. 

One Senator in the Eighth Senatorial District. 

District Attorney for the County of Middlesex. 

Clerk of Courts, Middlesex County. 

Register of Deeds, Northern Middlesex County District 

One County Commissioner. 

Two Associate County Commissioners, for Middlesex County. 

VACANCIES : 
Sheriff for Middlesex County. 
And to act upon the following matters : 
Question No. One : 
Shall the law described as follows : — 
This law amends General Laws, Chapter 131 as previously amended, 

71 



by repealing section 10SA thereof and adding thereto three new sections, 
105B, 1U5C and 114A. 

Section 105B provides that whoever uses any trap or other device 
for capture of fur bearing animals, which is not designed to kill such 
animal at once or to take it unhurt and which is likely to cause continued 
suffering to an animal caught therein, shall be fined fifty dollars, but traps 
or other devices for protection of property, set not more than fifty yards 
from any building, cultivated plot, or enclosures used for rearing poultry 
or game birds, to use of which the presence of vermin may be detrimental, 
are excluded from the appilcation of this section. 

Section 105C, provides for the submission to the voters at a municipal 
election in any city or town upon petition, of the question of whether the 
operation of section 105B shall be suspended or if it has already been 
suspended, of the question whether it shall again be operative in such city 
or town. 

Section 114A, provides that the Commissioner of Conservation may 
suspend the operation of section 105B for a period not exceeding thirty 
days within any specified territory under the control of his department. 

The law also provides for the submission by the Selectmen to the 
voters at a special town meeting in the current year, upon petition of the 
question as to whether the provisions of section 105B shall be suspended in 
any town; and which was approved by both branches of the General Court 
by vote not recorded, be approved? 

To obtain full expression of opinion, voters should vote on both of the 
following question : 

(A) If a voter desires to permit the sale of any and all alcoholic bev- 
erages in this city or town he will vote "Yes" on both questions. 

(B) If he desires to permit the sale of wines and malt beverages only 
herein, he will vote "No" on question one and "Yes" on question two. 

(C) If he desires to prohibit the sale of any and all alcoholic bev- 
erages herein he will vote "No" on both questions. 

One : Shall licenses be granted in this city or town for the sale herein 
of all beverages ( whiskey-rum-gin-malt-beverages, wines and all other alco- 
holic beverages) ? 

Two: Shall licenses be granted in this city or town for sale of 
wines and malt beverages (wines and beer, ale and all other malt 
beverages) ? 

One: Shall the pari-mutuel system of betting on licensed horse racing 
be permitted in this County? 

Two: Shall the pari-mutuel system of betting on licensed dog races 
he- permitted in this County? 

The polls will be open from eight o'clock A. M. to eight o'clock P. M. 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting attested copies 
thereof seven days at least before the time of said meeting as directed by 
vote of the Town. 

72 



HEREOF FAIL NOT and make return of this Warrant with your 
doings thereon at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given under our hands this Twenty-Seventh day of October, A. D. 1934. 

STEWART MacKAY, 
JAMES A. GRANT, 
FRANK J. LUPIEN, 

Selectmen of Chelmsford. 
RETURN 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chelmsford, October 27, 1934. 
Middlesex, ss. : 

PURSUANT TO THE WITHIN WARRANT, I have notified 
and warned the inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford by posting up 
attested copies of the same at the Post Offices in the Centre of the Town, 
South Chelmsford, North Chelmsflprd^ West Chelmisford and at the 
Schoolhouse, East Chelmsford and at the Golden Cove Schoolhouse at the 
Westlands, seven days at least before the date hereof, as within directed. 

JOHN J. BUCHANAN, 

Constable of Chelmsford. 



73 



STATE ELECTION 
November 6, 1934 



At a legal meeting of the inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford 

qualified to vote in State Elections, said meeting held in the Six Precincts 

of the Town pursuant to Warrant duly posted, the following candidates 

received the following number of votes set against their respective names, 
as follows : 

Candidate P-l P-2 P-3 P-4 P-5 P-6 Total 
Governor : 

Aiken, S. L. P 4 4 1 2 11 

Bacon, Rep 737 361 69 101 91 301 1660 

Curley, Dem 179 400 29 129 IS 78 833 

Follett, Prob 2 10 3 

Goodwin, Equal Tax 41 101 7 37 5 41 232 

Lewis, Soc :... 2 1 6 8 7 24 

Stevens, Com. Pty 2 3 1 6 

Blanks 11 24 2 6 2 6 51 

Total 978 894 114 282 116 436 2820 

Lieutenant Governor : 

Donovan, S. P 3 11 6 9 7 36 

Haigis, Rep 752 421 75 117 94 327 1786 

Hillis, S. L. P 9 12 1 1 2 4 29 

Hurley, Dem 184 390 29 130 20 83 826 

Lawton, Prob .4 5 1 6 2 . 18 

Riley, Com. Pty 2 2 2 6 

Blanks 24 53 2 17 13 109 

Total 978 894 114 282 116 436 2820 

Secretary : 

liurke, Com. Pty 2 5 1 4 1 13 

Cook, Rep 765 473 81 124 98 337 1878 

McGlynn. S. L. P 7 4 1 2 14 

Richards, S. P 4 12 5 9 8 38 

Santossuso, Dem 157 338 22 116 16 66 715 

Taylor, Prob 11 6 2 2 21 

Blanks 32 56 4 25 2 22 141 

Total 978 894 114 282 116 436 2830 

74 



Candidate P-l P-2 P-3 P-4 P-5 »P-6 Total 
Treasurer : 

Dionne, Rep 694 389 71 114 89 302 1659 

Ferry, Prob 14 11 3 616 ...41 

Gilmartin, S. L. P 6 5 12 1 2 17 

Hurley, Dem 208 409 31 133 19 96 896 

Maltzman, S. P ,.,, , 4 .8 5 6 .8 31 

Reynolds, C. P 4 4 2 1 1 12 

Blanks 48 68 3 19 5 21 164 

Total 978 894 114 282 116 436-2820 

Auditor : 

Blomen, S. L. P ,„ 4 7 1 2 14 

Buckley, Dem 205 377 28 123 17 93 843 

Cook, Rep. ..,.;„ ,.., 688 420 72 121 91 311 1703 

Hutchins, S. P 6 13 6 12 1 7 45 

Skers, Com. Pty 13 4 

Blanks 74 74 8 25 :; . 7 23 211 

Total ..'„. , 978 894 114 282 116 436 2820 

Attorney General : 

Berzon, S. P. „ - : - 4 9 5 8 1.7 34 

Dever, Dem 173 361 26 126 15 70 771 

Flaherty, C. P 3 25 2 2 1 33 

Hogan, Prob 10 9» • 2 -4- 6 31 

Oelcher, S. L. P . 3 6 1 10 

Warner, Rep. : „ 734 409 74 116 92 327 1752 

Blanks 51 75 4 26 7 26 189 

Total 978 894 114 282 116 436 2820 

Senator in Congress : 

Coolidge, S. P 3 10 6 8 10 37 

Smith, Prob 8 34 1 4 14 52 

Walsh, Dem 294 440 39 145 33 143 1094 

Washburn, Rep. K , 639 342 62 107 77 267 1494 

Waterman, S. L. P 7.7 1 1 . - 16 

Wicks, Com. Pty , 1 10 10 3; 

Blanks : 26 60 6 16 4 12 124 

Total '. 978 894 114 282 116 436 2820 

Congressman, Fifth District: 

6'Sullivan, Dem 129 312 26 112 15 66 660 

Rogers, Rep 833 561 82 156 100 -358 2090 

Blanks 16 21 6 14 1 12 - -70'- 

Total 978 894 114 282 116 436 2820 

75 



Candidate P-l P-2 P-3 P-4 P-5 P-6 Total 
Councillor, Sixth District : 

Brennan, Dem 173 379 26 124 18 77 799 

Burtnett, Rep 728 403 75 117 90 314 1734 

Blanks 77 112 13 41 8 45 296 

Total 978 894 114 232 116 436 2820 



Senator, Eighth Middlesex 
District : 

McCarty, Dem 199 404 32 122 18 95 870 

Stevens, Rep 717 422 75 129 94 315 1752 

Blanks 62 68 7 31 4 26 198 

Total 978 894 114 282 116 436 2820 



Representative, 11th Mdlsx. Dist. : 

Kelley, Dem 156 231 22 129 21 66 625. 

Valentine, Rep 789 636 89 134 89 348 2085 

Blanks 33 27 3 19 6 22 110 

Total 978 894 114 282 116 436 2820 



Dist. Attorney, Northern Mdlsx. : 

Bishop, Rep 715 405 74 110 90 315 1709 

Bruin, Dem 198 418 32 141 16 97 902 

McCabe, Ind 25 25 2 10 5 13 80 

Blanks 40 46 6 21 5 11 129 

Total 978 894 114 282 116 436 2820 



Clerk of Courts, Mdlsx. County. : 

Brennan, Dem 170 355 26 121 16 71 759 

Smith, Rep 730 436 74 123 91 332 1786 

Torigan. S. Pty 6 19 6 6 1 7 45 

Blanks 72 84 8 32 8 26 230 

Total 978 894 114 282 116 436 2820 



Register of Deeds. No. Mdlsx. : 

Montminy, Rep 740 417 66 136 90 322 1771 

Moriarty, Dem 182 416 40 124 19 91 872 

Blanks 56 61 8 22 7 23 177 

Total 978 894 114 282 116 436 2820 

76 



Candidate P-l P-2 
County Commissioner, Mdlsx. : 

Brennan, Dem 160 349 

Hamilton, S. P 8 13 

Jewett, Rep 739 456 

Blanks 71 76 

Total 798 894 

Asso. Commissioners, Mdlsx. : 

Donaldson, Rep 576 300 

Harley, Dem 161 350 

Murray, Dem 100 218 

Piggott, S. P 5 5 

Rogers, Rep -. 652 364 

Sexton, S. P 7 32 

Blanks 455 519 

Total 1956 1788 

Sheriff, Mdlsx. Co. (Vacancy) : 

Hurd, S. P 4 9 

McElroy, Rep 719 448 

Di Rago, Fusionist 1 

Robart, Dem 220 373 

Blanks 35 63 

Total 978 894 



D -3 


P-4 


P-5 


P-6 


Total 


24 


119 


17 


72 


741 


5 


11 





9 


46 


76 


122 


92 


329 


1814 


9 


30 


7 


26 


219 


.14 


282 


116 


436 


2820 


61 


95 


72 


,261 


1365 


26 


121 


16 


81 


755 


16 


74 


8 


49 


465 


5 


6 





5 


26 


68 


98 


82 


292 


1556 


2 


2 





5 


48 


50 


168 


54 


179 


1425 



228 564 232 872 5640 



6 


6 





6 


31 


76 


134 


90 


335 


1802 








1 





2 


26 


124 


20 


79 


842 


6 


18 


5 


16 


143 



114 282 116 436 2820. 



STEEL TRAP LAW 
(See Preceding Warrants) 

Question No. 1, Steel Traps: 

Yes 321 246 46 

No 248 188 25 

Blanks 409 460 43 

Total 978 894 114 



84 


34 


133 


864 


58 


39 


102 


660 


140 


43 


201 


1296 


282 


116 


436 


2820 



FOR ALL ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES 

Licenses, Alcoholic Beverages : 

Yes 364 459 50 133 46 170 

No 417 228 46 72 46 179 

Blanks 197 207 18 77 24 87 

Total 978 864 114 282 116 436 2820 



1222 



610 



77 



FOR BEER, ALE, WINES AND MALT BEVERAGES ONLY 

P-l P-2 P-3 P-4 P-5 P-6 Total 
Licenses. Beer, Ale, Wines, Malt : 

Yes 362 419 50 130 48 187 1196 

No 366 213 39 67 44 165 894 

Blanks 250 262 25 85 24 84 730 

Total 978 864 114 282 116 436 2820 

BETTING ON HORSE RACING 

Pari-Mutuel, Rorse Racing : 

Yes 413 469 53 136 45 181 1297 

No 361 204 40 69 45 169 888 

Blanks 204 221 21 77 26 86 635 

Total 978 864 114 282 116 436 2820 

BETTING ON DOG RACING 

Pari-Mutuel, Dog Races: 

Yes 328 401 46 113 36 142 1000 

No 406 237 46 80 51 201 1021 

Blanks 244 256 22 89 29 93 733 

Total 978 864 114 282 116 436 2820 

HAROLD C. PETTERSON, 

Town Clerk, Chelmsford, Mass., 

November 7, 1934. 



78 



MEETING OF THE TOWN CLERKS 

In the Eleventh Middlesex District 

November 14, 1934 

In accordance with Section 125, Chapter 54 of the General Laws of 
the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, a legal meeting of the Town Clerks 
in the Eleventh Middlesex Representative District was held on November 
14, 1934 in the office of the Town Clerk in the Town Hall, Chelmsford 
Centre for the purpose of declaring the elected Representative in the Gen- 
eral Court at the election held on November 6th, 1934, the result was as 
follows : 

■d 

"2- j« « So 

C O .uo p ~V tl — 

O ^ • -S ,= ~ % rt 

•>-> *o u v Hi) ■<-• 

O OJ CC, "3 ."tJ. .^ O 

< cq U u J > H 
Candidate 

Kelley 254 271 45 625 108 434 1737 

Valentine 802 507 193 2085 507 680 4774 

Pleiffer 10 1 

Towle 2 2 

Blanks 101 83 28 110 27 46 395 

Total ::. 1157 862 268 2820 642 1160 6909 

HORACE TUTTLE, Town Clerk, Acton. 
RUTH C. WILKIN S, Town Clerk, Carlisle. 
HAROLD C PETTERSON, Town Clerk, Chelmsford. 
WILLIAM CHANNING BROWN} Town Clerk, Littleton. 
CHARLES L. HILDRETH, Town Clerk, Westford. 

November 14, 1934. 



79 



WARRANT FOR SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

At Upper Town Hall, Chelmsford Centre, 

Tuesday Evening, December 4, 1934 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Middlesex, ss. : 

To John Buchanan, a Constable of Chelmsford. 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid you are hereby required 

to notify and warn the legal voters of said Chelmsford to meet in the 

Upper Town Hall at Chelmsford Centre on Tuesday, the Fourth day of 

December, 1934, at eight o'clock in the evening, then and there to act 

upon the following articles, viz : 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of Fifty Dollars ($50.00), or some other sum, for the purpose 
of defraying the Selectmen's expenses; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of Three Hundred and Thirty-One Dollars ($331. 00), for the 
purpose of defraying election expenses; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of Two Hundred Nineteen Dollars ($219.00), for the purpose 
of defraying police expenses incurred by Special Police Officers doing 
strike duty ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of Four Thousand Dollars ($4,000.00), or some other sum, 
for the purpose of defraying the cost of Old Age Assistance and Out- 
side Poor ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00), or some other sum for 
the purpose of purchasing materials to carry on the Emergency Relief 
Administration projects; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from the School 
Appropriation Fund for Instruction, the sum of Seven Hundred and 
Seventy-Five Dollars ($775.00), or some other sum, to the School 
Appropriation Fund for Operation and Maintenance ; or act in rela- 
tion thereto. 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from the School 
Appropriation Fund for Instruction, the sum of One Hundred and 
Twenty-Five Dollars ($125.00), or some other sum to the School 
Appropriation Fund for Operation and Maintenance ; or act in relation 
thereto. 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting attested copies 
thereof, at the Post Offices in the Centre of the Town, South Chelms- 
ford, North Chelmsford, and West Chelmsford and at the Schoolhouse, 
East Chelmsford, and at the Golden Cove Schoolhouse, Westlands, seven 
days at least before the time appointed for holding the meeting aforesaid. 

80 



HEREOF FAIL NOT and make return of this Warrant with your 
doings thereon, to the Town Clerk at the time and place of holding the 
meeting aforesaid. 

Given under our hands this Twenty-Fourth day of November in the 
year of our Lord nineteen hundred and thirty-four. 

FRANK J. LUPIEN, 
JAMES A. GRANT, 
STEWART MarKAY, 

Selectmen of Chelmsford. 

RETURN 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Middlesex, ss. : 

I have served the foregoing Warrant by posting attested copies 
thereof at the Post Offices in Chelmsford Centre, North Chelmsford, 
and West Chelmsford and South Chelmsford and at the Schoolhouse 
in East Chelmsford and at the Golden Cove Schoolhouse, Westlands, seven 
days before the time of said meeting as directed by a vote of the Town 
and by the foregoing order. 

JOHN J. BUCHANAN, 
Constable of the Town of Chelmsford. 
November 26, 1934. 



81 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
December 4, 1934 

At a legal meeting of the inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford 
qualified to vote in Town affairs, held pursuant to Warrant duly* posted 
in the six precincts of the Town, said meeting held in the Upper Town 
Hall at Chelmsford Centre on December 4, 1934, at eight o'clock in the 
evening, the following business was transacted, to wit : 

The meeting was called to order by Moderator Walter Perham and 
Town Clerk Harold C. Petterson was requested to read the Warrant, 
after the Warrant was partly read, on a motion made by James A. Grant 
it was voted to waive the further reading of the Warrant. 
Under Article One : 

On a motion made by James A. Grant, it was voted to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Fifty Dollars ($50.00) for the purpose of defray- 
ing Selectmen's expense. 
Under Article Two : 

On a motion made by Stewart MacKay it was voted to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Two Hundred Seventy-Eight Dollars and Seventy- 
Nine Cents ($278.79) for the purpose of defraying election expense. 
Under Article Three : 

On a motion made by Stewart MacKay it was voted to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Two Hundred Nineteen Dollars ($219.00) for the 
purpose of defraying Police Expenses. 
Under Article Four : 

On a motion made by Frank J. Lupien it was voted to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Four Thousand Dollars ($4,000.00) for the pur- 
pose of defraying the cost of Old Age Assistance and for Outside Poor. 
Under Article Five : 

On a motion made by Frank J. Lupien it was voted to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) for the pur- 
pose of purchasing materials to carry on the Emergency Relief Adminis- 
tration projects. 
Under Article Six : 

On a motion made by John A. McAdams it was voted to transfer the 
sum of Seven Hundred Seventy-Five Dollars ($775.00) from the School 
Account Instruction to 'the School Account Operation and Maintenance. 
Under Article Seven : 

It was voted ot dismiss this article. 

Voted to adjourn this meeting at 8.30 P. M. 

WALTER PERHAM HAROLD C. PETTERSON 

Moderator Town Clerk 



82 



VITAL STATISTICS 
For the Year Ending December 31, 1934 

Attention is called to the following vital statistics. It is important 
that these records shall be correct. If any errors are discovered the 
Town Clerk will deem it a favor to have them reported at once so that 
corrections may be made. 

As required by Chapter 16, Section IS, General Laws of Massachu- 
setts, notice is hereby given that the Town Clerk will furnish blanks 
for returns of births to parents, householders, physicians and registered 
hospital officers applying therefor. 

BIRTHS RECORDED 

Date Name Parents 

JAN 

4 Harold Allan Vinal Walter E. and Bertha (Morrison) 

9 David Ronald Merrill J. Leslie and Grace (Robinson) 

13 Clare Blanche Ayotte Henry E. and Elsie (Manseau) 

15 . Emmanuel Stephanos and Theodora (Katchikos) 

27 Blanche Cody Mike and Esther (Prowker) 

FEB 

14 Esther Lessard Leonile and Cora (Mailloux) 

22 Mary Flynn George R. and Mary B. (Woodhead) 

MARCH 

1 Robert Hampton Hill Arthur J. and Florence (Gillman) 

4 Elizabeth Louise Bomil Charles and Rose (Mercier) 

10 Stephen Theadore Dulgarian Tatiass and Satina (Wastanian) 

15 Illegitimate 

21 Nancy Winifred Burke John J. and Winifred (Tucker) 

23 Constance Agnes Cummings Charles E. and Frances (Baron) 

24 Leonard Clamore Dursthoff, Jr Leonard C. and Sabra (Culton) 

25 Sonja Brothen Olsen ...Ole H. and Gudney (Brothen) 

27 Barbara Ann Devine — . -< John and Gladys (Cook) 

27 Howard Merwin Trott Carl and Flora B. (Luke) 

31 Richard Arthur Secord Minot and May (Buswell) 

31 Doris Maybelle Turner Frank Peter and Lucy (Armitage) 

APRIL 

2 Donald Stephen Callahan Donald S. and Marjorie (Stephens) 

10 Eileen Louise Flavell ...Chester and Corrine (House) 

18' Nancy Ann Lapham Nathan G. and Pauline (Worden) 

18 Robert Smith Mallard John and Mary (Rousseau) 

18 Soterios Zouzas William and Helen (Kismetis) 

19 David Baron Edward and Ethel (Clough) 

22 Doris Janet Gagnon Albert and Corrine (Loiselle) 

29 Alva Gale Hughes, Jr Alva G. and Beatrice (Ciciley) 

83 



Date Name Parents 

MAY 

1 Therese Pelletier intone and Irene (Auger) 

3 Robert Olney Larter Edward A. and Margaret L. (Olncy) 

7 Dorothy Ann Barlow Erson I", and Dorothy (Smith) 

X Mary Angelina Gonsalves Manuel and Mary C. (Goes) 

10 Gloria Marie Blanehe Marchildon.. Arthur N. and Laura (Gendreau) 

15 Roberta Bell William and Ceeilia (Adawski) 

15 Douglas Greene McKissock Robert R. and Karline (Greene) 

16 Helen Larkin John F. and Anna (Welsh) 

21 Leo Raymond Lacourse Leo and Abbie T. (Golden) 

23 Audet Ernest A. and Cecile (Malo) 

23 Ruth Gibson DeCarteret Mbert J. and Edna (Palm) 

28 Roarke Joseph and Helen (Woods) 

JUNE 

9 Judith Ellen Dryden Edward O. and Alice (Wilson; 

15 Simpson James and Catherine (Clark) 

16 Anderson Aufin and Emma (Plymouth) 

16 Yvonne Marie Watt Russell W. and Yvonne J. (Guenwood) 

19 Mary Muldoon Thomas J. and Ruth E. (Edwardson) 

20 Illegitimate 

22 Leon Albert Gervais -Mphonse and Georgianna (Chevallier) 

28 Estelle Rose Marcotte Alfred and Mary (Gervais) 

JULY 

2 Franklin Peter and Phyllis A. (Burke) 

5 James Mortimer Gallivan, Jr James M. and Alice V. (Goode) 

7 Geoffroy ....'. Joseph and Adoina (Gendreau) 

1 Nancy Ruth Luke Wendell D. and Grace E. 

(Bridgeford) 

19 Roger Arthur LaPointe Emile R. and Blanche (Gagne) 

13 Francis Joseph Kukulski Joseph and Blanche (Oczkowski) 

14 Jeanne Memory Klarman Gene P. and Ada M. (Boutilier) 

18 Elizabeth Lena Brule Edward J. and Elizabeth L. (Wring) 

20 Stillborn 

23 Stillborn 

23 Norman McKinnon, Jr Norman and Eathon (Siravl) 

23 Stillborn 

2^ Mary Rita Egan Paul and Ella (Saunders) 

AUG 

2 Lorraine Katherine Miller Ellswood S. and Margaret K.. 

( Brown ) 

8 Robert Arthur Brake \rthur H. and Johanna (Scott) 

10 James Cornelius Reedy Albert J. and Ada E. (Hemlow) 

11 Jeanne Idalene Fournier Victor and Irene (Gaudette") 

12 Carolyn Ruth MacQuesten Wallace and Minnie (Flavell) 

13 Pauline Birtwistle Joseph F. and Edith (Hughes) 

84 



Date Xanu Parents 

AUG. 

14 Joseph Albert Patenaude Joseph A. and Mildred M. (Roberts) 

10 Lear James and Mabe! (Burns) 

17 Robert Allen Ferron Ernest and Myrtle (Knight) 

17 Pierro James and Rita (Wright) 

23 Sullivan William and Myrtle (Haywood) 

23 Russell Raymond Everett Edward R. and Sarah C. (Billings) 

25 Robert Donald Gean Albert and Jermaine (Lamotte) 

25 Jean Elizabeth Supple William Joseph and Esther M. 

(Blodgett) 

27 Carolyn Ann Fox Edward and Evelyn (Silva) 

31 Regis McEnaney Leo Henry and Adella (Parkhurst) 

31 June Eleanor Gaudette Albert Emile and Lora (Gendreau) 

SEPT. 

1 John Everett Watson Elmore E. and Edna V. (Edwards) 

1 Patricia Tresa Smith Joseph and Stella Gertrude (Monette) 

4 Mary Larkin Bernard P. and Esther I. (Marshall) 

7 Janet Bicknell Leroy E. and Delia (Laskey) 

8 Robert Eliott McCrady Boyd Ames and Helen Louise 

(Linstad) 

9 Olson Oscar and Georgianna (Thompson) 

10 Donald Patrick Carrigg John Patrick and Alice (Roderick) 

15 Lucille Joan Arsenault Edward and Jeanette (Tremblay) 

17 Ronald Joseph Cahill Patrick D. and Margaret T. (Guihan) 

22 Mary Claire Hunt Bernard and Catherine M. (Preston) 

25 Evelyn May Hand Joseph and Elizabeth (Morton) 

30 Psitas - Charles and Vasilike (Panaras) 

29 Ann Shirley Curran William and Bertha (Naseau) 

OCT. 

3 Armand Alphonse Carbonneau Louis A. and Rose Elizabeth 

(Sevigny) 

4 Helen Mary Pratt Earl Fuller and Alphonisne 

(Cloutrer) 

6 Norene Mary Kemp Farley H. and Edna May (Hoffman) 

7 Allan Charles Mello James and Gertrude (Allen) 

23 William Arthur Connor William and Yvonne (Ayotte) 

23 Mary Elin Larson Royal L. and Catherine (Crowley) 

24 Eleanor Patricia Lamb Winthrop J. and Susan V. (Matuck) 

NOV. 

1 Leslie Carroll Burroughs Hobart M. and Edith (Brown) 

. 3 William Mackie, Jr William Bernard and Mary J. 

(McCann) 

5 Kathleen Elizabeth MacElroy Leonard S. and Jennie E. (Pearson) 

12 Roberta Joyce Pond Frederick L. and Verna L. (Sloat) 

21 Milton Leroy VanNorden Lamert and Mary F. (Coburn) 

25 George Winfield Billings Kenneth and Elsie (Metcalf) 

85 



Date Name Parents 

DEC. 
6 John Edward Snow Ralph and Gladys (Brotz) 

12 Raymond Arthur Eno, Jr Raymond and Amelia (Deschene) 

13 Stillborn 

13 Donald James Monette Joseph Henry and Alice (Smith) 

14 McCarty Charles and Ellen (Devine) 

16 Reslow Albert M. and Josephine McNulty) 

19 Janet Foss Dutton Adams and Ethel (Foss) 

20 Linnea Swanson Paul F. and Beulah (Kimball) 



MARRIAGES 



Date Name Residence Birthplace 

JAN. 
3 Howard O. Billings Chelmsford, Mass Worcester, Mass. 

Lois Mae Goodwin Lyndon, Vt Sutton, Vt. 

25 Cleo St. Francis Nashua. N. H Nashua, N. H. 

Hazel E. Cummings Chelmsford, Mass E. Haven, Vt. 

27 Raymond A. Eno Chelmsford, Mass...Tewksbury, Mass. 

Emelia C. Deschenes Lowell, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

FEB. 

7 Ralph E. Linstad Chelmsford, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

Ruth Louise Harmon Chelmsford, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

17 William Dunham Lowell, Mass Ireland 

Frances (Veglo) Zemmerella Lowell, Mass. .-. Italy 

MARCH 

9 Kirk H. Bancroft, Jr Lowell, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

Edna M. Davis Chelmsford, Mass. ..Chelmsford, Mass. 

18 William F. O'Brien Brighton, Mass Boston, Mass. 

Irene V. Armitage Chelmsford, Mass...Hoylake, England 

22 Willis George Jeffrey Lowell, Mass Dublin, N. H. 

Pearl Milison Allen Lowell, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

25 William Arthur Lee Somerville, Mass Chazy, N. Y. 

Madalene Irene Hadley.. Somerville, Mass Hillsboro, N. H. 

APRIL 

1 Manuel Mello, Jr Chelmsford, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

Hazel Silva Lowell, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

2 Arthur L. Krouss Lowell, Mass W. Berlin, Mass. 

Bertha M. McNichols [ Lowell, Mass Lowell. Mass. 

7 Charles A. Clark Chelmsford, Mass. ..Chelmsford, Mass. 

Alice Gallien Chelmsford, Mass Derry, N. H. 

7 Edmond F. Robey Chelmsford, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

Laura Fortin Lowell, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

8 Alvin Norman Moorehouse Lowell, Mass Lawrence, Mass. 

Thelma Lakin Chelmsford, Mass. ..Chelmsford, Mass. 

86 



Date Name Residence Birthplace 

APRIL 

14 Raymond H. Grenier Lowell, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

Gertrude B. Quinn Chelmsford, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

14 Raymond Putnam Lowell, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

Thelma Drake Chelmsford, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

14 Martin Kurgonas —Lowell, Mass Lithuania 

Fora (Alkonis) Balkum Chelmsford, Mass Poland 

21 Arthur Rodrigue Chelmsford, Mass. ..Chelmsford, Mass. 

Jeanette Belisle Lowell, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

26 Cecil Jeffers Leominster, Mass. ..New Vineyard, Me. 

Grace Bend Chelmsford, Mass Derry, N. H. 

28 Douglas E. Flaherty ^ Tewksbury, Mass '. Dracut, Mass. 

Hazel T. Shinkwin Chelmsford, Mass. ..Chelmsford, Mass. 

MAY 

5 Joseph Urbanowitz Lowell, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

Sophie Jasczanin Chelmsford, Mass Shennadah, Pa. 

17 Richard West Herrick Stow, Mass Billerica, Mass. 

Dorothy Woodies Coburn Chelmsford, Mass. ..Chelmsford, Mass. 

7 John Matley Chelmsford, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

Sophia Campbell : Lowell, Mass Glasgow, Scotland 

22 Harry L. Shapleigh Chelmsford, Mass Dover, N. H. 

Anna C. Peterson Chelmsford, Mass. ..Chelmsford, Mass. 

26 Barrett Fisher Lowell, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

Frances Bessie Sunbury Chelmsford, Mass. ..Tewksbury, Mass. 

30 John Francis Dorsey Lowell, Mass Boston, Mass. 

Leona Corinne Clark Chelmsford, Mass. ..Chelmsford, Mass. 

JUNE 

2 Ernest Clifford Cress Chelmsford, Mass Lawrence, Mass. 

Bertha Mildred Emery Chelmsford, Mass. ..Chelmsford, Mass. 

3 Wellman F. Rogers Dracut, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

Alice Leona Michaud _ Chelmsford, Mass ....Lowell, Mass. 

9 Scott P. Hume -Lowell, Mass... Concord Jet., Mass. 

Marguerite May Hill Chelmsford, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

16 George W. Mann Westford, Mass W. Rindge, N. H. 

Emily Elizabeth Adams ...Chelmsford, Mass...Whitinsville, Mass. 

18 Alan Parlee Chelmsford, Mass. ..Chelmsford, Mass. 

Anna N. Kinney Chelmsford, Mass ..Lowell, Mass. 

23 Sewell Everett Bowers Chelmsford, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

Alice Mae Fisher Chelmsford, Mass New Brunswick 

23 Robert J. O'Connor Manchester, N. H. ..Manchester, N. H. 

Olive M. Pike Manchester, N. H...Manchester, N. H. 

24 Joseph F. Collopy '.. Lawrence, Mass Lawrence, Mass. 

Mary A. DeCosta. Chelmsford, Mass..Mattapoisette,Mass. 

30 George C. Nickerson Chelmsford, Mass.-Fitzwilliam, N. H. 

Viola Byam Chelmsford, Mass. ..Chelmsford, Mass. 

30 Harold Arthur Linstad Chelmsford, Mass.-Chelmsford, Mass. 

Alice Agnes Clark Chelmsford, Mass.-Chelmsford, Mass. 

87 



Date Name Residence Birthplace 

JULY 
1 Clinton II Crawford Chelmsford, Mass.-.Chelmsford, Mass. 

Rose A. Carle Lowell, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

7 Martin J. Bergsten Chelmsford, Mass Sweden 

Rachel A. Jelley Chelmsford, Mass. 

High Falls, Ulster Co., X. V. 

iarence S. Nelson Concord, Mass Concord, Mass. 

I'.sther K. Olsen Chelmsford. Mass Lowell, Mass. 

24 Willis Hubert Porter Springfield, Mass Toccoa, Ga. 

Lora Frances Bowen Chelmsford. Mass Lowell. Mass. 

28 Kverett Howland Hanson. Mass.-.E Bridgewater, Mass. 

Sarah Alice (Confrey) Dunphy.... Brockton. Mass Brockton, Mass. 



AUG. 
4 Oscar C. Cutting Manchester. N. H Rumley, N. H. 

Kstella R. Ordway Manchester. X. H Waterville, Maine 

'. Merritt E. Hemenway Cambridge, Vt Cambridge. Yt. 

Grace H. Page Manchester. X'. H Manchester, Yt. 

12 Anthony Martin, Jr Tewksbury. Mass Lowell, Mass. 

Mary V. Abreu Chelmsford. Mass Lowell. Mass. 

14 Eliot K. Parkhurst Chelmsford, Mass... Chelmsford. Mass. 

Rita M. Regan Lowell, Mass Lowell. Mass. 

14 Joseph DeSousa. Jr Taunton, Mass Taunton, Mass. 

Ruth Rigby New Bedford. Ms.. .Xew Bedford, Ms 

14 William J. McLaughlin Chelmsford, Mass Brooklyn, X. Y. 

Ruth E. Hill Chelmsford, Mass.-Chelmsford. Mass. 

24 Leslie A. Wetmore Chelmsford, Mass. ..Chelmsford, Mass. 

Ivy Baxendale Chelmsford, Mass Hudson, Mass. 

31 Arthur L. House Chelmsford, Mass. ..Chelmsford, Mass. 

Thelma F. Paignon Chelmsford. Mass. -Chelmsford. Mass. 



SEPT 

3 Charles D. Gray Lowell, Mass Laconia, N. H. 

Lottie May Brown Lowell, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

4 Leo R. Larkin Chelmsford. Mass. -Chelmsford, Mass. 

Josephine Duprey Groton, Mass Canada 

l > Earl John Sousa Chelmsford, Mass Lowell. Ma>> 

Frances Lobas Lowell, Mass Lowell. Ma^. 

16 Andrew J. Hennessey Lowell, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

Zelpha M. Mercier Chelmsford, Mass Canada 

18 Henry F. Lamburn Chelmsford. Mass Waltham, Mass. 

Marion Greenlaw Chelmsford, Mass Newton, Mass. 

8 Albin Hendrickson Westford, Mass Sweden 

Ruth Evelyn Reno Westford, Mass Chelmsford, Mass. 

22 Raymond Brown Lowell, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

Stella Michalowski Chelmsford, Mass Westford, Mass. 

24 John P. Quinn Chelmsford, Mass. ..Chelmsford, Mass. 

\nna G. McSorley Lowell, Mass Lowell. Mass. 

88 



Date Name Residence Birthplace 

OCT. 

4 Albert E. Russon Tyngsboro, Mass Fitchburg, Mass. 

Kathleen T. Melhinch Chelmsford, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

6 Charles A. McLaughlin Lowell, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

Irene A. Audoion Chelmsford, Mass. -Chelmsford, Mass. 

Wallace H. Scobie Chelmsford, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

Varis N. Guilmette..! Lowell, Mass Tewksbury, Mass. 

11 Herbert George Reid Chelmsford, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

Irene Edith Pepin Lowell, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

13 Alfred W. House Chelmsford, Mass.-Chelmsford, Mass. 

Bessie A. Cameron Chelmsford, Mass-Harcourt,N.B.,Can. 

14 Leonard DePalma Chelmsford, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

Rose Fantozzi Chelmsford, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

24 Roland Leon Wetherbee Boxboro, Mass Boxboro, Mass. 

Dorothea Pearl Coburn Chelmsford, Mass Hollis, N. H. 

28 Christo Pitarys Nashua, N. H Greece 

Xenia Tassios Chelmsford, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

NOV. 

3 Charles B. Thompson Lowell, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

Minnie B. Simpson Chelmsford, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

8 Guy W. Clark -..Carlisle, Mass Carlisle, Mass. 

Dorothy E Woods Carlisle, Mass Cabot, Vt. 

23 George S. Wright, Jr Chelmsford, Mass St. Albans, Vt. 

Dorothy E. MacNeill Chelmsford, Mass Boston, Mass. 

30 Joseph A. Caron Westford, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

Veronica Welch Chelmsford, Mass. ..Chelmsford, Mass. 

30 Peter Dirubbo Chelmsford, Mass Bellkna, Italy 

Rose Alice Veiga : Chelmsford, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

DEC. 

2 Francis Joseph Cassidy Chelmsford, Mass.-Chelmsford, Mass. 

Elizabeth V. Marshall Lowell, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

2 Joseph C. Whibley ....Ferandine, Fla San ford, Fla. 

Loretta F. Dean Chelmsford, Mass.. Lowell, Mass. 

9 Clarence E Craft .Chelmsford, Mass Shirley, Mass. 

Flora C. Mullen Ayer, Mass. Nova Scotia 

15 Edgar W. Santamour Chelmsford, Mass.-Chelmsford, Mass. 

Jessie R. Sargent Chelmsford, Mass.-Chelmsford, Mass. 

17 Simon D. Murphy Waldoboro, Me Round Pond, Me. 

Ruby A. Bridges Waldoboro, Me Rockland, Me. 

24 William Henry Wayne..... Chelmsford, Mass Westford, Mass. 

Beatrice Louise Drewett Chelmsford, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

29. E. Harold Frasier Billerica, Mass Taunton, Mass. 

Mary Ethel Birtwell Chelmsford, Mass Lowell, Mass. 



8 


10 


10 


19 


7 


24 


5 

10 



14 




9 


27 


7 


19 



DEATHS 

Date Name Years Mos. Days 

JAN. 

21 Henry Graham 69 

(Husband of Elizabeth Brady) 

FEB. 

4 Ethel (Adams) Flemings 53 

(Wife of Harry B. Flemings) 

5 Charles W. Carkin 70 

(Husband of Catherine E. Akin) 

6 Frederick Alonzo Russell 75 

(Husband of Sarah Eva WorthenJ 

21 Nancy Ann Reid 

21 Calvin H. Meekin 75 

23 Charles A. Randlett 80 

(Husband of Frances E. Lord) 
26 Edwin Swain 87 

(Widower of Susan E. Adams) 
5 Abbie Gustafson 43 

(Wife of A. Samuel Gustafson) 

MAR. 

2 Elizabeth Owens 27 1 10 

(Wife of Chester Lynn Owens) 

7 William McEnan Bartlett 10 

8 Angie L. Bean 72 

8 Samuel Haines 89 

(Widower of Marina Sunbury) 

10 Eli P. Watkins 90 

(Widower of Sarah Barrett) 

12 Rosalie (Lemay) Manseau 60 

(Wife of Napoleon Manseau) 

13 Abbott Worthen Russell 42 

19 Nellie M. Warner 73 

(Widow of Lucius B. Warner) 
23 James L. McDonald 65 

(Husband of Mary Smith) 
25 Charles Marshall Cudworth 79 

(Widower of Cora Rouillard) 
25 Julia E. Barton 89 

(Widow of Herbert W. Barton) 
30 Arthur S. Maynard 55 

(Husband of Katherine Fitzpatrick) 

APRIL ■ rw ) 

3 Mary A. Judge 75 19 

(Widow of Charles R. Judge) 

90 



3 


9 


8 
14 

5 


2 


17 


2 


6 


11 




21 




9 


8 


7 


25 


9 


13 









Mos. 


Days 


10 








3 


• 











8 


21 














2 


22 








7 


3 



Date Name Years 

APRIL 

14 Hildege Plouffe , 65 

(Husband of Emma Leclaire) 
23 Richard D. Beauchemin 15 

MAY 

3 James J. Savage 56 

(Widower of Mary E. Flynn) 

5 . Alexander D. Callahan 35 

(Husband of Annie Armitage) 

6 Charles C. Stuart 69 

(Widower of Margaret McDonald) 
12 Joseph H. Scobie 65 

(Widower of Elizabeth Moore) 

18 Loretta G. Dinnigan 21 

18 Henry Ellwood Sargent 48 

(Husband of Cora McKenney) 
23 Lewis Morse 90 

(Widower of Lovicy Lane) 
30 Lillian Mae Hannaford 24 

(Wife of Leslie N. Hannaford) 

JUNE 

3 \nn E. Conlin i .'.. 74 

(Widow of John H. Conlin) 

3 Nellie Pozniak 36 

(Wife of Anthony Pozniak) 

3 Mary Livingston White 75 

(Wife of Herbert Rollin White) 

6 Sarah E. McKinnon 54 

(Wife of Kenneth D. McKinnon) 

Sophia Tamkun 43 

(Wife of John Tamkun) 

2' Angelina Sousa 

29 Tustin J. Potter 50 

(Widower of Sarah Donovan) 

12 Celina LaCroix 63 8 25 

(Widow of Frank LaCroix) 
JULY 

2 Florence Connell 6 

14 Stanley Sakalinskas 44 

(Husband of Antonina Suslauciutia) 

18 Florence M. Ingham 24 

19 Bertha E. Scribner 70 

(Wife of Charles F. Scribner) 

20 Stillborn 

22 Therese Pelletier 

23 Stillborn 
27 William Theodore Freeman 14 

91 















8 


18 


6 


12 





C 


10 


2 





















8 


24 


7 


10 


2 


21 


2 


16 



Dale Name Years Mus. Days 

JULY 

11 Elmira Hanson 82 10 11 

(Widow of Richard Hanson) 
30 Elizabeth Jones 73 8 27 

(Wife of Thomas Jones) 

AUG. 

11 Hilda B. Dunigan 27 

IS Zilpha Jennie Hill 72 9 11 

(Widow of Robert M. Hill) 

23 Dennis J. Sheehan 54 

23 Stillborn 

25 Frederick A. Lappage 24 7 5 

26 Lizzie Anne Winship 87 7 3 



SEPT. 

3 John W. Burton 53 5 20 

3 Basil Houle 66 1 IV 

(Husband of cannot be learned) 

9 Thomas R. Jeffreys 86 1 28 

(Husband of Eva Leighton) 

17 William C. Stanley 61 1 20 

(Husband of Lillia E. Stanley) 

26 Francis Richardson Dickinson 60 10 25 

(Husband of Rebecca A. Dunbar) 

26 Arcilla Auger 49 

(Wife of Isadore L. M. Auger) 
29 Dorothy Frances Gav ...' 24 10 28 



OCT. 

9 Henry Sumner Queen 78 

(Husband of Georgia M. Cummings) 

10 Margaret Wayne 93 

(Widow of John Wayne) 

15 Frank T. Loucraft 62 

(Husband of Catherine Charlton) 



NOV. 

10 Stillborn 

14 Edward Seeton 81 

(Widower of Lidie C. Smith) 

20 Mary White 72 

26 Caroline R. Corliss 88 

(Widow of Charles Corliss) 

26 Mary Etta Driscoll 65 

29 Roberta Joyce Pond 



92 



11 


12 


10 


7 









8 


18 


5 


24 











16 



Date Name Years Mos. Days 

DEC. 

1 Mary Ellen McGauhey 80 5 

(Widow of William F. McGauhey) 

2 Martha M. Towne 93 3 22 

(Widow of Ezra C. Towne) 

4 Sarah A. Clements 84 

(Widow of Robert J. Clements) 

5 Lena Alice Fisher 50 

(Wife of George A. Fisher) 

7 Enima Kilbourne 83 

10 John O. Bjerke T 64 

(Husband of Hedda Caster) 
20 Rose Murphy 53 

(Wife of Stephen J. Murphy) 
22 John A. Anderson 71 

(Husband of Ingrid Nelson) 

26 Mary R. Paton 78 

(Widow of Henry Paton) 

27 Laura L. Grant 72 

(Widow of Eugene Grant) 

28 Thomas P. Talty 28 






(. 


6 


18 


4 


26 


4 


13 








6 


4 


8 


28 


10 


18 









93 



JURY LIST FOR THE TOWN OF CHELMSFORD 

Alcorn, James, Farmer, Hunt Road, South Chelmsford. 
Adams, George C, Machinist, Wightman St., North Chelmsford. 
Ballinger, William, Retired, Cottage Row, North Chelmsford. 
Bartlett, Charles E., Retired, Bartlett St., Chelmsford. 
Brown, Eliphalet G., Printer, Chelmsford St., Chelmsford. 
Brown, William, Clerk, Newfield St., North Chelmsford. 
Callahan, Donald F., Laborer, Groton Road, North Chelmsford. 
Coburn, Frank A. P., Merchant, Chelmsford St., Chelmsford. 
Coalter, Samuel L., Laborer, Wright St., North Chelmsford. 
Blomgren, Sigurd, Salesman, Beaulieu St., East Chelmsford. 
Daughraty, Charles, Box Maker, Mallock Road, East Chelmsford. 
Dow, John C, Machinist, Gorham St., East Chelmsford. 
Doyle, Michael, Fireman, Mt. Pleasant St., North Chelmsford. 
Day, George W., Retired, Westford St., Chelmsford. 
Edwards, A. Franklin, Moulder, Main St., West Chelmsford. 
Ellinwood, Loren J., Retired, Main St., West Chelmsford. 
Field, LaForest E., Poultryman, Warren Ave., Chelmsford. 
Fallon, Joseph T., Laborer, North Road, North Chelmsford. 
Finnick, Charles, Farmer, Gorham St., East Chelmsford. 
Fletcher, Fred L., Farmer, Westford Road, Chelmsford. 
Faulkner, Luther W., Farmer, High St., Chelmsford. 
Franklin, Verne A., Laborer, Chelmsford St., Chelmsford. 
Gorham, Alfred E., Mechanic, Chelmsford St., Chelmsford. 
Hoelzel, Charles E., Operator, Washington St, North Chelmsford. 
Harrington, John E., Postmaster, Highland Ave., North Chelmsford. 
Harris, E. Dyer, Retired, Robin Hill Road, South Chelmsford. 
Henderson, Josiah C, Laborer, Chelmsford St., Chelmsford. 
Hummiston, Elliott F., Retired, School St., West Chelmsford. 
Jennison, Lewis H., Salesman, Gorham St., East Chelmsford. 
Johnson, Wilhelm T., Tailor, Wilson St., Chelmsford. 
Johnson, John G., Tailor, Wilson St., Chelmsford. 
Kiberd, James, Sr., Painter, Newfield St., North Chelmsford. 
Kempe, John M., Paymaster, Main St., West Chelmsford. 
Lupien, Frank J., Selectman, Westford Road, Chelmsford. 
Lamb, Harry, Contractor, Chelmsford St., Chelmsford. 
Machon, Joshua, Laborer, Dunstable Road, North Chelmsford. 
McAdams, John A., Draftsman, Stedman St., Chelmsford. 
Mcintosh, George A., Mechanic, Subway Ext., Chelmsford. 
McMaster, Frank E., Electrician, North Road, Chelmsford. 
McGlinchey, Peter, Stone Cutter, West Chelmsford. 
Meagher, John J., Superintendent, Gorham St., East Chelmsford. 
L'Herault, Octave L., Merchant, Dunstable Road, North Chelmsford. 
Paignon, Emile E.. Merchant, Proctor Road, South Chelmsford. 
Parker, John F., Real Estate, Acton Road, South Chelmsford. 
Picken, William T., Printer, Middlesex St., North Chelmsford. 
Parker, John G., Clerk, Golden Cove Road, Chelmsford. 
Perham, Walter, Manufacturer, Westford St., Chelmsford. 
Queen, Clifford, Laborer, New r field St., North Chelmsford. 

94 



Scobie, Herbert, Laborer, Riverneck Road, East Chelmsford. 
Shedd, Harry L., Retired, Boston Road, Chelmsford. 
Sullivan, Daniel W., Farmer, Riverneck Road, East Chelmsford. 
Sweetser, Hosmer W., Merchant, Chelmsford St., Chelmsford. 
Tucke, Edward, Sr., Retired, Grosvenor St., North Chelmsford. 
Vinal, Fred I., Carpenter, Newfield St., North Chelmsford. 
Wright, Warren, Assessor, Robin Hill Road, Chelmsford. 
Woodward, Clarence, Banker, Westford St., Chelmsford. 
Stopherd, Albert, Retired, Cottage Row, North Chelmsford. 
Stuart, Harold W., Moulder, Sherman St., North Chelmsford. — 



Turors drawn 



Adams, George C, Drawn September 7, 1934. 
Callahan, Donald F., Drawn November 16, 1934. 
Edwards, A. Franklin, Drawn September 7, 1934. 
Hoelzel, Charles E., Drawn September 7, 1934. 
Jennison, Lewis H., Drawn October 15, 1934. 
McGlinchey, Peter, Drawn September 15, 1933. 
Meagher, John J., Drawn March 10, 1934. 
L'Herault, Octave, Drawn March 10, 1934. 
Tucke, Edward, Sr., Drawn September 15, 1933. 
Vinal, Fred L, Drawn September 15, 1933. 



HAROLD C. PETTERSON, 

Town Clerk, Chelmsford, Mass. 



95 



FINANCIAL REPORT OF THE TOWN CLERK FOR 
FOR YEAR 1934 

(On Monies Handled for Town, State and County) 



DOG LICENSES 

(December 1 to December I) 

Male Dugs 44 8 

Female o9 

Female Spayed 50 

567 



RECEIPTS 

Birth Certificates $ 4.50 

Marriage Licenses 134.00 

Death Certificates 3.25 

Recording Fees 201.90 

Certificates of Registration (Gasoline) 1275 

Junk Licenses 14.00 

Auctioneer's Licenses 0.00 

Marriage Certificates .50 

Pool and Bowling Licenses 15.50 

Dog Licenses 1,341.00 

Sporting Licenses 765.25 

$ 2,498.05 



PAID OUT 

Birth Certificates $ 4.50 

Marriage Licenses 134.00 

Death Certificates 3 25 

Recording Fees 201.90 

Certificates of Registration (Gasoline) 12.75 

Junk Licenses 14.00 

Auctioneer's Licenses 6.00 

Marriage Certificates .■ .50 

Pool and Bowling Licenses 15.50 

Dog Licenses 1.227.60 

Dog License Fees 113.4(1 

Sporting Licenses 680.50 

Sporting License Fees 84.75 

$ 2,498.65 



HAROLD C. PETTERSON, 

Town Clerk 



96 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF ASSESSORS 
For the Year Ending December 31, 1S34 

To the Citizens of Chelmsford: 

We herewith submit our annual report for the year ending December 
31, 1934, as follows : 

We beg to advise the public that our regular meeting time is the 
first Wednesday in each month from 2 to 4 P. M. 

The 1934 tax rate of $30.00 per thousand was computed on the follow- 
ing figures : 

Appropriations $249,935.18 

Loans and Interest 17,282.48 

Interest on Temporary Loans 2,000.00 

Overlay Deficit— 1931 341.36 

Overlay Deficit— 1932 1,292.66 

State Tax 9,500.00 

Auditing Municipal Accounts 83.14 

Parks and Reservations 72.92 

Hospital and Home Care C. W. Vets and Widows 100.00 

Middlesex County Tax 9,450.95 

Overlay 1934 3,156.12 

Total Amount to Be Raised $293,214.81 

Less : 

Estimated Receipts (Town) $ 22,497.00 

Estimated Receipts (State) 34,000.41 

Welfare Gift (Federal) 1,435.67 

Estimated Receipts (Motor Excise Tax) 10,007.13 

Free Cash as Voted by Town and Approved by the 

State Tax Commissioner 20,000.00 

Total Deductions 87,940.21 



Total Tax- Committed to Tax Collector $205,274.60 

Less 2293 Polls at $2.00 Each 4,586.00 



Total Tax Levied on Property $200,688.60 

Valuation of Assessed Property : 

Buildings $4,296,720.00 

Land : 1,540,480.00 

Personal Estate : 852,420.00 

Total Assessed Value - $6,689,620.00 

Tax Rate $30.00 per thousand x 30.00 

Total Tax Levied on Property $ 200,688 60 

97 



Xumber of Horses Assessed 145 

Number of Cows Assessed 599 

Xumber of Sheep Assessed _ 5 

Xumber of Xeat Cattle Assessed 86 

Xumber of Swine Assessed 121 

X" umber of Fowl Assessed 19.655 

Xumber of Dwellings Assessed 1.838 

Xumber of Acres of Land Assessed 13.383 



MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE TAX 

Xumber of Motor Vehicles Assessed..— 2,507 

Total Value of Motor Vehicles $379,651.00 

Total Tax Committed to Collector 1934 10,462.58 



DECEMBER ASSESSMENT 

OMITTED TAXES 

Polls (30 at $2.00) each $ 60 00 

Real Estate (Value $15,540 at $30 per 1000) 466.20 

Personal Estate (Value $100 at $30 per 1000) 3.00 



Commitment to Collector in December _ $529.20 

WATER AXD FIRE DISTRICT TAXES 
Tax Rate $5.00 per Thousand 

EAST CHELMSFORD WATER DISTRICT 

Personal Property Value $ 5,745.00 

Value of Buildings- 336,945.00 . 

Value of Land 144,280.00 

Total Valuation 8486,970.00 

Amount to be Raised by Taxation as per Notice 

from Clerk of District $ 2,100.00 

Overlay for Abatements 335.83 

$ 2.435.83 

Total Valuation $486,970.00 

Tax Rate $5.00 per thousand x 5.00 

$ 2,434.85 
Plus Gain by Fractions .98 

Committed to Tax Collector $ 2,435.83 $ 2.435.83 

98 



NORTH CHELMSFORD FIRE DISTRICT 

Tax Rate $1.50 per Thousand 

Personal Property Value $ 310,885.00 

Value of Buildings 1,220.825.00 

Value of Land 340,165.00 

Total Valuation $1,871,875.00 

Amount to Be Raised by Taxation as Per Notice 

from Clerk of District 2,750.00 

Overlay for Abatements 58.52 

$ 2,808.52 

Total Valuation $1,871,875.00 

Tax Rate $1.50 per Thousand x 1.50 

$ 2,807.81 
Plus Gain by Fractions .71 

Committed to Tax Collector $ 2,808.52 $ 2,808.52 

Respectfully submitted, 

WARREN WRIGHT, Chairman, 
HERBERT C. SWEETSIR, 
JOHN E. HARRINGTON, 

Assessors for the Town of Chelmsford. 



99 



Report of Town Accountant 



Herewith is submitted the annual report of the Town Accountant 
in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 624, Section 7 of the Re- 
vised Laws. 

All transfers made and shown in this report were authorized by vote 
of the Finance Committee or by vote in Town Meeting. 

RECEIPTS 

GENERAL REVENUE 

TAXES 

CURRENT YEAR: 

Poll $ 2,214.00 

Personal Estate 22,540.20 

Real Estate 100,848.36 



$125,602.56 

PREVIOUS YEARS : 

Poll $ 1,884.00 

Personal Estate 1,504.36 

Real Estate 92,065 99 

Old Age Assistance 955.00 



$ 96,409.35 



MOTOR EXCISE TAX: 

Motor Excise Tax, 1934 

Motor Excise Tax, Previous Years 



$ 8,757.30 
1.867.74 

$ 10,625.04 



TAX TITLE REDEMPTION: 

Tax Title Redemption $ 2,988.72 

FROM THE STATE: 

National Bank Tax $ 27.49 

Veterans' Exemption 116.22 

Income Tax, 1934 State Valuation 17,375.50 

Tncome Tax, Educational 22,050.00 

Corporation Tax, Business 4,715.62 

Corporation Tax, Gas and Electric Co.'s 1,931.16 

Corporation Tax, Street Railway 45.14 



100 



Corporation Tax, R. R. and T. T 256.83 

Corporation Tax, Public Service .62 

Total from State $ 46,518.58 

GRANTS AND GIFTS 
FROM COUNTY: 

Dog Licenses $ 1,155.47 

Various Roads, Chapter 90 2,000.00 

Middlesex Street 5,998.52 

North Road 3,608.01 



$ 12,76200 

FROM STATE : 

Federal Emergency Relief $ 1,446.56 

Middlesex Street : 5,995.55 

Various Roads, Chapter 90 2,498.16 

North Road 6,219.67 

Aid to Industrial Schools 1,124.64 



$ 17,284.58 

FINES AND FORFEITS 

Court Fines $ 457.16 

LICENSES AND PERMITS 

Plumbing Permits $ 215 00 

Automobile Dealers 90.00 

Sunday Licenses 82.00 

Common Victualer's Licenses 53 88 

Gasoline Licenses 19.00 

Bottling Licenses 10.00 

Liquor Licenses 1,727.00 

Pedlar's Licenses 52.00 

Milk Licenses 40.00 

Alcohol Licenses 57.00 

Wrestling Permits 12.50 

Garage Licenses 15.50 

Oil Burner Permits 23.50 

All Other Fees 19.00 



$ 2,416.38 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT 
SELECTMEN : 

Telephone Tolls — _ $ 1.30 

All Other 4.00 

$ 5.30 

101 



TAX COLLECTOR: 

Tax Title Costs $ 99.10 

TOWN CLERK: 

Recording Fees $ 201.90 

Birth and Death Certificates 775 

Marriage Certificates 134.50 

Certificate of Registration 2.25 

Dog Licenses 1,229.40 

All Other Licenses 35.50 

$ 1,611.30 

TOWN HALLS : 

Rent from Chelmsford Centre Town Hall $ 223.00 

Rent from North Chelmsford Town Hall 78.00 

$ 301.00 

PROTECTION OF PERSONS AND PROPERTY 

POLICE DEPARTMENT: 

Ambulance Service $ 5.00 

Damage to Property 18.00 

Telephone Tolls 1.65 

Revolver Permits 21.75 

$ 46.40 

FIRE DEPARTMENT : 

Assitance Rendered, Other Towns $ 25.00 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES : 

Sealing and Testing ., $ 190.81 

FORESTRY : 

Extermination of Moths $ 80.70 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT 

Reimbursement for T. B. Patients $ 395.71 

All Other 10.00 



$ 405.71 
HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

Removal of Snow $ 130.50 

Use of Roller 37.50 

Damage Claims 10.00 



$ 178.00 
102 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE 
INFIRMARY : 
Sale of Produce $ 907.92 

REIMBURSEMENT FOR OUTSIDE POOR: 

Cities and Towns $ 782.74 

State Temporary Aid 2,759.15 

From Individuals : 95.00 

Old Age Assistance '. 2,315.97 , 

$ 5,952.86 

SOLDIERS BENEFITS: 
State Aid $ 156.00 

SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

Tuition, State Wards $ 3,096.41 

T'lition, Other Towns 551 70 

$ 3,648.11 

LIBRARY DEPARTMENT 

Fines $ 16.21 

Sale of Books and Rent :....: 31.00 

$ 47.21 

UNCLASSIFIED 

Workmen's Compensation $ 78.00 

Dividend on Insurance Policy 5.38 

CEMETERIES 
Sale of Lots and Graves $ 255.00 

INTEREST 

On Taxes $ 6,799.79 

On Trust Fund Perpetual Care 736 61 

$ 7,536.40 

MUNICIPAL INDEBTEDNESS 
Anticipation of Revenue $110,000.00 

AGENCY TRUST AND INVESTMENT 
EAST CHELMSFORD WATER DISTRICT : 
Tax and Interest -. $ 917.01 

NORTH CHELMSFORD FIRE DISTRICT : 
Tax and Interest ,. $ 1,848.05 

103 



CEMETERY PERPETUAL CARE DONATIONS: 

( lifts $ 200.00 

REFUNDS 

Assessors' Department $ 22.50 

Public Buildings 10.03 

Library Department 7.88 

Health Department 3 00 

Public Welfare Department 323. 42 

Forest Fire Department 1.00 

Highway Department 182.35 

Checks Taken in on Sundry Persons 19.19 

Interest. General Loans - 180.20 

E. R. A 127.01 

Total from Refunds $ 876.58 

Total Receipts for 1934 $450,436.21 

Cash on Hand January 1. 1934 35.806.20 

Total Receipts for 1934 and Cash on Hand January 1. 1934 $486,242.41 

PAYMENTS 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT 
MODERATOR : 

Salary $ 10.00 

SELECTMEN'S DEPARTMENT : 

Salaries , $ 675.00 

Stationery and Postage 14.98 

Printing and Advertising 67.56 

Telephone 13805 

All Other 10.25 

$ 905.84 

ACCOUNTING DEPARTMENT : 

Salary $ 1.620.00 

Stationen- and Postage 18.43 

Binding and Printing 21.50 

All Other 7.17 

$ 1,667.10 

TOWN CLERK'S DEPARTMENT: 

Salary $ 180.00 

Stationery and Postage 30.30 

Printing and Advertising 50.55 

Supplies 10.50 

$ 271.35 
104 



TOWN TREASURER AND TAX COLLECTOR: 

Salary $ 1,800.00 

Clerk Hire 174.60 

Stationery and Postage 416.14 

Printing and Advertising 379.81 

Insurance — Robbery 62.00 

Certification of Notes > 20.00 

Drawing and Recording Tax Deeds 393.45 

Treasurer and Collector's Bond 480.00 

Traveling Expense 25.49 

Legal Expense 150.00 



$ 3,901.49 
ASSESSOR'S DEPARTMENT: 

Wages $ 1,900.00 

Stationery and Postage 16.60 

Printing and Advertising 151.81 

Transportation 145.01 

Clerk Hire 147.00 

Typewriter , 34.50 

All Other 6.00 



$ 2,400.92 
LAW DEPARTMENT : 
TOWN COUNSEL: 

Salary $ 280 00 

FINANCE COMMITEE: 

Advertising - $ 4.00 

ELECTION AND REGISTRATION : 

Registrars' Salaries $ 154.25 

Election Officers 782 40 

Printing and Advertising 267.48 

Rent ) 20.00 

All Other 12.42 

Clerk Hire 15.00 

Traveling Expense 47.75 



$ 1,299.30 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS (TOWN HALLS) : 

Janitors' Salaries $ 855.00 

Fuel 1,021.53 

Light and Water 680.63 

" Repairs — Material and Labor 310.02 

Brooms, Wax, Floor Cleaner, Etc 56.14 

Chairs, North Hall 680.00 

$ 3,603.32 
105 



PROTECTION OF PERSONS AND PROPERTY 

POLICE DEPARTMENT: 
Salaries: 

Chief $ 2,000.00 

Patrolmen 5,092.87 

Election Police 37.63 

Special Police 65 91 

School Police 273.50 

Investigations 32.70 

Keeping Prisoners 44.00 

Gas and Oil 346.05 

Equipment for Men 78.43 

Printing, Stationery and Postage 143.43 

Telephone 257.97 

Auto and Motorcycle Repairs 210 96 

Light and Fuel 15.22 



$ 8,598.67 
FIRE DEPARTMENT : 
Salaries : 

Engineers $ 35000 

Firemen 2,962.00 

Janitors 450.00 



$ 3.762.00 



ENGINEERS EXPENSE: 

Transportation $ 139.70 

Clerk 20.00 



$ 159.70 

FIRES : 

Labor $ 406.74 

MAINTENANCE : 

Garage Rent $ 252 51 

Repairs of Apparatus 352.78 

Gas and Oil 72.82 

Fuel 407.25 

Light 234.19 

Alarm System 212 77 

Hose 1.266.00 

Water 15.00 

Telephones 449.97 

Equipment for Men 49.72 

Lumber and Other Supplies 142.38 

Expense, Water Holes 75.40 

$ 3.530.79 
106 



HYDRANT SERVICE: 

North Chelmsford $ 500.00 

Chelmsford Centre 500.00 

West Chelmsford 20.00 

$ 1,020.00 
Total for Fire Department $8,879.23 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES : 

Wages : $ 150.00 

Printing 11.50 

Apparatus ! 9.39 

$ 170.89 
MOTH DEPARTMENT: 

Supt. Salary t $ 250.00 

Labor 730.50 

Insecticides 235.20 

Repairs '. 50.86 

Tools 7.77 

Printing 16.50 

$ 1,290.83 
TREE WARDEN : 

Labor $ 135.15 

Tools and Repairs 14.03 

$ 149.18 
FOREST FIRE DEPARTMENT: 

Warden $ 60.00 

Fighting Fires 536.01 

Investigations 56 50 

Repairs and Equipment 183.65 

Stationery, Postage and Advertising . _ 6.80 

Garage Rent 48.00 

Gas and Oil 13.23 

Chemicals 13.22 

All Other : 10.00 

$ 927.41 
FISH AND GAME WARDEN : 

Salary :. $ 100.00 

HEALTH AND SANITATION 
SALARIES : 

Board of Health $ 630.00 

Agent 315.00 

Meat Inspector 607.00 

Milk Inspector .-. 315.00 

107 



Animal Inspector 180 00 

Plumbing Inspector, Fees 200.00 

Physicians' Salaries 90.00 

$ 2,337.00 
.MAINTENANCE: 

Stationery and Postage $ 22.34 

Printing and Advertising 27.30 

Burying Dogs and Cats 66.00 

Drugs and Medicines 2.58 

Return of Births and Deaths 4.00 

Agent, Use of Automobile 64.60 

All Other 3.56 

$ 190.38 
AID: 

Sundry Persons '. $ 717.99 

CARE OF PUBLIC DUMPS : 

Labor $ 50.00 

Total for Health and Sanitation $ 3,295 37 

HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

SUPERINTENDENT : 

Salary $ 1,800.00 

GENERAL MAINTENANCE: 

Labor $ 9,612.55 

Trucks '.: 2,631.50 

Stone, Gravel, Sand «. 357.46 

Equipment and Repairs 2,032.08 

Gasoline and Oil 958.36 

Cold Patch and Tar 654.53 

Coal 71.50 

Road Oil 536.87 

Acetylene Gas 101.50 

Medical Service 72 00 

All Other 121.51 

$ 17,149 86 
TRUCK MAINTENANCE : 

No. 1 International Truck $ 341.79 

Federal Truck 423.62 

No. 2 International Truck 962 20 

No. 4 International Truck 177.05 

No. 5 International Truck 100.78 

$ 2,005.44 
108 



ROAD BINDER: 

Oil and Cold Patch $ 6,974.00 

JENSEN STREET: 

Labor and Materia! $ 199.72 

L1NWOOD STREET : 
Labor and Materials $ 100.00 

AUTOMOBILE TRUCK $ 2,176.58 

POWER GRADER $ 2,673.00 

SYLVAN AVENUE : 
Labor and Materials $ 99.63 

DUNSTAN STREET : 
Labor and Material $ 200.00 

TWIST ROAD : 
Labor and Material $ 199.60 

NORTH ROAD : 
Labor and Material $ 15,920.27 

MIDDLESEX STREET: 
Labor and Material '. $ 11,990.85 

CHAPTER 90, VARIOUS ROADS: 
Labor and Material $ 7,494.73 

Total for Highway Department $ 68,983.68 

STREET LIGHTING : 
Lighting $ 10,654.18 

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE 
SALARIES : 

Salaries of Board $ 292.50 

Special Investigator 1,300.00 

Printing and Postage 56.24 

Truck Maintenance 136.66 

All Other 6127 

$ 1,554.17 
OUTSIDE RELIEF : 

Groceries and Provisions $ 6,838.92 

Fuel 1,190.04 

Rent and Board !. 3,556 77 

109 



Medicine and Attendance 1,340.14 

State Institutions 1,090.61 

Clothing and Shoes 627.01 

Town Cash 3,249.00 

Light and Water 38.00 

Burials 391.00 

Delivering F. E. R. A. Coal 519.50 

Hair Cutting 16.55 

Household Supplies -16.47 

Transportation 55.71 

$ 18,959.72 
MOTHERS' AID: 

Town $ 355.00 

RELIEF BY OTHER CITIES AND TOWNS: 

Cities $ 1,469.80 

Towns 602.93 



$ 2,072.73 
Total Outside Relief $ 21.387.45 

OLD AGE ASSISTANCE: 

Town J... $ 7,420.58 

By Other Cities and Towns 150.00 



$ 7,570.58 
INFIRMARY: 

Supt. Salary $ 810.00 

OTHER EXPENSES: 

Other Employees $ 353.50 

Groceries and Provisions 554 39 

Clothing and Dry Goods 135.50 

Fuel and Light 315.47 

Water 33.93 

Hay and Grain 593.57 

Tools and Hardware 83.45 

Medicine and Medical Attendance 129.40 

Telephone 48.55 

Spraying : 6.05 

Seed, Plants and Fertilzer 142.52 

Cow 70.00 

Household Supplies 73.06 

Building Repairs 100.00 

Horse Shoeing 16.55 

Gas and Oil 889 

All Other 31.83 

Total for Infirmary Department $ 3,506.66 

Total Charities ..„ • $ 34,311.36 

110 



SOLDIERS' BENEFITS 
. STATE AID: 

Cash $ 122.00 

MILITARY AID : 

Cash $ 80.00 

SOLDIERS' RELIEF: 

Groceries and Fuel $ 36.14 

Cash _ 986.00 

Total for Soldiers' Benefits $ 1,224.14 

SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 
ADMINISTRATION : 

Supt. Salary $ 3,250.00 

Traveling Expenses 8.00 

Committee Expenses .' 350.00 

Attendance Officers 30.00 

Stationery, Printing and Postage 71.20 

Telephone 91.55 

$ 3,800.75 
INSTRUCTION : 
Teachers' Salaries : 

High : $ 18,132.50 

Elementary < !.. 41,685.91 

Supervisors 1,330.00 

• $ 61,148.41 
BOOKS AND SUPPLIES : 

High— Text and Reference Books $ 714.38 

Elementary — Text Books and Reference 772.39 

High— Supplies 1,025.39 

Elementary Supplies 1,062.46 

$ 3,574.62 
Total Instruction ....$ 64,723.03 

OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE: 
Janitors' Salaries : 

High : $ 2,040.00 

Elementary 6,335.00 

$ 8,375.00 
FUEL : 

Elementary 2,945.39 

High $ 808.70 

$ 3,754.09 

Light, Water and Power $ 1,668.11 

111 



REPAIRS: 

High $ 903.(15 

Elementary 2,005.57 

$ 2.908.62 
JANITORS' SUPPLIES: 

High $ 64.08 

Elementary 179.43 

$ 243.51 
BOILER INSURANCE: 

High $ ~2.<:>2 

Elementary .' 238 20 

S 291.12 

Total Operation and Maintenance S 17,240.45 

AUXILIARY AGENCIES : 
Transportation : 

High ? 4,150.00 

Elementary 4.000.00 

$ 8.15000 
NURSE: 

Salary $ 1.567.68 

Supplies - 117.30 

$ 1.684.98 

Physicians' Salaries 570.1 

Total Auxiliary Agencies S 10,404.98 

FURNITURE AND FURNISHINGS: 

High $ 67.20 

Elementary 86.20 

$ 153.40 

VOCATIONAL AND CONTINUATION SCHOOLS : 

Tuition $ 2.291.45 

Total for Schools 3 98,614.06 

LIBRARIES 

ADAMS LIBRARY: 

Librarian $ 500.00 

Janitor and Other Help 466.18 

Repairs 44 50 

Books and Periodicals 305.82 

Light. Fuel and Water 516.62 

112 



Transporting Books 70.00 

Binding 5767 

Telephone 48.91 

Cleaning Heating Plant 40.00 

All Other 9.96 



Water 
Tools 



$ 2,059.66 
NORTH CHELMSFORD LIBRARY: 

Annual Appropriation , $ 1,200.00 

RECREATION AND UNCLASSIFIED 

PARKS : 

Labor , - $ 989.35 

Fertilizer 

Plants, Trees, Etc 



21.70 
108.73 



Care of Flags and Poles 41.30 



43.05 
61.68 



All Other 28.44 



$ 1,294.25 
UNCLASSIFIED : 

Memorial Day : 

Dinners 140.00 

Music and Other Expenses 150.50 

Traffic Light, North Road 19.27 

North Ciielmsford Common 927.84 

Defense of Law Suits „ 234.00 

Expense, C. W. A, Administrator . 50.00 

Workmen's Compensation 78.00 

Tax Title '. 96.16 

Emergency Educational Program 11.04 

Town Clock _ .' 30.00 

Town Reports, Printing and Delivery 874.00 

Finance Committee Reports, Printing 62.50 

Ins. Sinking Fund Treas. Bond 40.00 

Constable 55.75 

Land and Personal Damages 619.98 

Police Department, Strike Duty 219.00 

Fire Department, Automobile Truck 1,197.43 

School Department, New Toilets, Princeton Street 1,700.00 

Public Buildings, Insurance 786.85 

EMERGENCY RELIEF ADMINISTRATION PROJECTS : 

Building Supplies and Lumber $ 2,391.06 

Electric Supplies — 108.54 

Hardware and Tools 622.50 

Gasoline : - - 604.81 

Office Supplies - 33.35 

113 



Paint and Varnish 404.20 

Plumbing Supplies and Labor 313.47 

Sand and Gravel 916.90 

Transportation 408.58 

Truck Hire 1,698.03 

Investigators 194.00 

Sewing Project Supplies and Expenses 133.55 

Curbing 1,868.77 

Granite 376.15 

Loam 390.50 

Road Oil 84.70 

All Other 66.15 

Total $ 10,615.26 

UNPAID BILLS, 1933: 

Selectmen's Department $ 5.50 

Treasurer's Department 9.75 

Election and Registration 18.50 

Public Buildings 100.49 

Cemetery Department 23.10 

School Department 68.25 

Highway Department 244.89 

Welfare Department 1,069.00 

Infirmary 12 28 

Police Department 10.00 

Health Department 52.50 

Park Department 22.25 



$ 1,636.51 

TAILINGS : 

Check Taken in and Later Cashed $ 1.79 

Total Recreation and Unclassified $ 20,840.13 

CEMETERIES 

Commissioners' Salaries $ 105.00 

FOREFATHERS' CEMETERY : 

Labor $ 380.80 

Tools 4.40 

Transportation 1.00 

Water 8.50 



$ 394.70 



FAIRVIEW CEMETERY : 
Labor $ 250.00 

114 



HART POND CEMETERY: 

Labor $ 380.00 

Deeds : 4.75 

Transportation 1.00 

Tools and Repairs 13.15 



$ 398.90 

PINE RIDGE CEMETERY: 

Labor $ 390.90 

Transportation :'. 1.00 

Tools and Repairs 5.85 

Seed 1.90 



$ 399.65 

RIVERSIDE CEMETERY : 

Labor _ $ 384.00 

Water 15.00 

Transportation 1.00 



$ 400.00 

WEST CHELMSFORD CEMETERY : 

Labor $ 298.80 

Tools and Repairs 28.77 

Shrubs and Seed 11.50 

Gravel 9.20 

Transportation •. , 1.00 

Trucking 34.50 

Water 8.00 

$ 391.77 

Total for Cemeteries - . $ 2,340.02 

INTEREST AND MATURING DEBT 
INTEREST: 

New Grade School ._ $ 2,253.16 

High School . 325.00 

Anticipation of Revenue 1,611.50 

Middlesex County Sanatorium 975.00 

$ 5,164.66 

MATURING DEBT : 

Grade School - $ 8,666.00 

High School 3,250.00 

Middlesex County Sanatorium 2,500.00 

$ 14,416.00 
115 



ANTICIPATION OF REVENUE: 

Loans $155,000.00 

AGENCY TRUST AND INVESTMENT 

AGENCY: 

State Tax $ 9,784.00 

County, Dog License Fees 1,229.40 

$ 11,013.46 

COUNTY TAX : 

County Tax 9,450.95 

County Tax, Tuberculosis Patients at Middlesex Sanatorium 996.80 

$ 10,447.75 

TRUST: 

Cemetery Perpetual Care Donations $ 200.00 

Interest on Perpetual Care Donations 736.61 

$ 936.61 

REFUNDS 

1934 Taxes $ 78.00 

1933 Taxes 50.15 

Taxes, Previous Years 83.97 

Motor Excise Tax, 1934 388-68 

Motor Excise Tax, 1933 70.83 

Taxes, Interest 58.25 

Sunday License Fee -. 2.00 

$ 731.88 

Total Payments for 1934 $475,692.49 

Cash on hand December 31, 1934 :.... 10,549.92 



Grand Total $486,242.41 



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Town Treasurer's Report 

For Year Ending December 31, 1934 

Balance on hand January 1, 1934 $ 35,806.20 

RECEIPTS 



GENERAL REVENUE 



Taxes of 1934 $125,602.56 

Taxes of Previous Years 96,409.35 

Motor Vehicle Excise Tax 1933 1,811.49 

Motor Vehicle Excise Tax 1934 8,757.30 

Taxes from State 46,518.58 

Licenses and Permits .._ 2,607.33 

Fines and Forfeits 457.16 

Grants and Gifts , 33,142.99 

Motor Vehicle Excise Tax 1932 56.25 

Tax Title Redemptions 3,066.72 



$318,429.73 



COMMERCIAL REVENUE 

General Government $ 1,845.00 

Protection of Persons and Property 323.66 

Health 405.71 

Highways * 178.00 

Infirmary . 907.92 

Charities 5,952.86 

Soldiers Benefits 156.00 

Schools - 551.70 

Libraries 4721 

Unclassified 5.38 

Cemeteries 455.00 

Interest - 7,536.40 

Agency and Trust - 2,765.06 

Refunds *... 876.58 

Anticipation of Revenue Loans 110.000.00 



$132,006.48 
$486,242.41 



PAYMENTS 

Paid Out on 81 Warrants Containing Items Au- 
thorized by the Board of Selectmen and the 
Town Accountant .._.:. $475,692.49 

Balance on Hand December 31, 1934 10,549.92 



$486,242.41 



141 



RECONCILIATION OF TREASURERS CASH 

Bank Balance December 31, 1934: 

Appleton National Bank $ 17,053.65 

Union Old Lowell National Bank 1,497.79 

$ 18,551.44 
(As per statements on following pages.) 
Checks Outstanding December 31, 1934 8,001.52 

Check Register Balance $ 10,549.92 

The large amount of outstanding checks is caused by reason of a War- 
rant being issued on December 31, 1934, and consequently the checks 
issued for payment of these accounts could not be cancelled in Decem- 
ber 1934. 

The Treasurer's books of accounts are always open for public inspection 
to any citizen of Chelmsford, if any information is desired the Treasurer 
will be glad to assist any person in the matter. 

HAROLD C. PETTERSON, 

Town Treasurer, 



142 



INSURANCE RECORD DECEMBER .31, 1934 

The following is a list of properties insured against fire, casualty, burglary and 
holdup on file and in custody of the Town Treasurer. 

School Buildings : Company Amount Expires 

South Chelmsford Lowell Mutual Fire Ins. Co $ 7,500.00 Jan. 14, 1935 

Highland Avenue Federal Mutual Fire Ins. Co 7,500.00 May 27, 1935 

Westlands Federal Mutual Fire Ins. Co 7,500.00 May 27, 1935 

West Chelmsford (Quessy) Federal Mutual Fire Ins. Co 5,000.00 May 26, 1935 

West Chelmsford (Quessy) Lowell Mutual Fire Ins. Co 10,000.00 May 27, 1935 

'West Chelmsford (Quessy) Lowell Mutual Fire Ins. Co 10.000.00 May 27, 1935 

East Chelmsford Dorchester Mutual Fire Ins. Co... 3.500.00 May 26, 1935 

East Chelmsford Dedham Mutual Fire Ins. Co 1,500.00 May 26, 1935 

East' Chelmsford - Abington Mutual Fire Ins. Co 5,000.00 May 26, 1935 

East Chelmsford Federal Mutual Fire Ins. Co 5,000.00 May 26, 1935 

East Chelmsford Lowell Mutual Fire Ins. Co 10,000.00 May 25, 1935 



Total for School Buildings $72,500.00 



Public Halls: 

Centre Hall Firemen's Fund Ins. Co $ 5,000.00 May 1, 1935 

.Centre Hall , Continental Ins. Co 5,000 00 May 1, 1935 

North Chelmsford Hall Federal Union Ins. Co 3,000.00 May 1, 1935 

North Chelmsford Hall Norwich Union Ins. Co. ..' 3,000.00 May 1, 1935 



Total for Public Halls 



.$16,000.00 



AUTOMOBILE CASUALTY INSURANCE 
Highway Dept. : 

International 1925 2-ton truck....Travelers Ins. Co $10,000.00 June 22, 1935 

International 1934 2-ton truck....Travelers Ins. Co 10,000.00 July 11,1935 

International 1930 5-ton truck....Aetna Casualty Ins. Co 10,000.00 Jan. 1,1935 

Federal 1925 2-ton truck Hartford Accident Ins. Co 10,000.00 Apr. 4,1935 

BURGLARY AND HOLDUP INSURANCE 

Town Treasurer, Tax Collector : 
Cash and Securities in Safe 

and Office - Century Indemnity Co $ 2,675.00 July 22, 1935 

Cash and Securities Outside 

Office ...Century Indemnity Co 2,000.00 July 22, 1935 

HAROLD C. PETTERSON, 

Town Treasurer. 



143 



UNION OLD LOWELL NATIONAL BANK 
Lowell, Mass. 

TOWN OF CHELMSFORD 

HAROLD PETTERSON, Town Treasurer 

STATEMENT OF YOUR ACCOUNT 
Balance Brought Forward 
Date Checks in Detail Deposits Date Balance 

Dec. 1, '34 $ 1,501.87 
Dec. 1, '34 $ 4.08 Dec. 1, '34 1,497.79' 

KEY 
Lst— List. IN— Interest. RT— Return. 00*— Closed Account. OD— Overdraft. 

DN — Service Charge. 

PLEASE EXAMINE AT ONCE 

If no errors are reported in ten days the account will be considered correct. 

Notify of any permanent change in Address. 

The Last Amount in the Column Is Your Balance. 

STATEMENT OF ACCOUNT 
with 
APPLETON NATIONAL BANK 
Lowell, Mass. 
TOWN OF CHELMSFORD 

KEY 

CC — Certified Check. 00* — Closed Account. CM — Credit Memo. 

DM — Debit Memo. IN — Interest.' Lst — List. OD— Overdraft. 

SC — Service Charge for Preceding Month. TX — Tax on Checks for Preceding Month 

RT— Returned. 
The Last Amount in This Column Is Your Balance 
Detailed figures necessary for your income tax return are on this statement. 
Please Preserve it for future reference. 
Checks Paid Deposits Balance 

BALANCE FROM LAST STATEMENT Dec. 1, '34 $118,585.31 

$ 



Dec. L'34 117,615.73* 






42.75 


$ 12.00 


$ 32.50 


82.07 


125.41 


6.50 


4.00 


42.75 


50.00 


12.00 


492.40 


23.20 


12.00 


8.00 


12.00 


12.00 






135.00 


81.00 


12.00 


12.00 


24.00 


56.00 


81.68 


64.12 


40.62 


1.00 


47.02 


4.00 


12.00 


55.57 


38.47 


8.45 


2.00 


42.75 


59.85 


55.57 


59.85 


366.23 


36.34 


8.78 



144 



Checks 


Paid 




.54 


8.00 


1.60 


l,S93.32Lst 






3,78S.23Lst 


14.40 


6.60 


1.10 


4.00 


67.50 


2,785.07Lst 






S33.30Lst 


1.00 


4.50 


10.00 


10.00 


113.80 


76.80 


8.00 




30.34 


10.00 


12.00 


3.00 


3.00 


15.00 


12.00 


7.50 


6.00 


11.55 


10.00 


10.00 


10.00 


5.00 


1.89 


. 13.00 


4.00 


3.00 


731.28Lst 






682.42Lst 


2.50 


5.00 


5.00 






15.00 


19.00 


18.04 


5.40 


5.76 


7.50 


7.20 


6.75 


5.40 


1.00 


10.80 


10.80 


70.83 


.50 


6.00 


29.17 


19.50 


69.00 


110.98 


4.00 


27.27 


6.71 


3.64 


4.00 


74.24 


64.12 


3.00 


13.91 


7.88 


7.88 


6.55 






12.00 


1.00 


3.00 


6.75 


7.65 


5.40 


2.00 


5.76 


12.00 


16.00 


7.20 


6.75 


12.50 


7.68 




12.00 


135.60 


30.00 


60,000.00 


2.00 


1.50 


608 


6.75 


5.40 


6.75 






1.00 


7.65 


7.20 


7.20 


6.75 


5.40 


4.00 


5.76 




10.00 


.50 


12.00 


2.75 


260.98 


270.00 


171-.00 


21.60 


21.60 


6.00 


5.40 


32.50 


5.00 


5.00 


10.00 


4.00 


7.50 


7.88 


126.35 


815.00 


2.00 


12.00 


4.73 


4.00 



Deposits Balance 

Dec. 3, '34 116,301.29* 
4,475.84Dec. 4, '34 119,183.81* 



Dec. 5, '34 115,304.98* 
Dec. 6, '34 112,519.91* 



3,152.91 



Dec. 7, '34 114,915.42* 



Dec. 8, '34 114,742.14* 

Dec. 10, '34 114,010.86* 

14.50Dec. 11, '34 114,468.69* 
1,138.25 



Dec. 12, '34 113,826.86* 



Dec. 13, '34 113,721.17* 



2,027.00Dec. 14, '34 55,542.09* 



Dec. 15, '34 55,497.13* 



Dec. 17, '34 54,662.80* 



145 



BALANCE FROM LAST STATEMENT 

Deposits Balance 

12.00 

1.20 
81.55 
10.00 

9.00 Dec. 18, '34 53,064.90 s1 

67.50 
19.38 

3.13 
90.25 



c 


leeks Paid 


4.00 


10.00 


12.00 


135.37 


108.30 


171.47 


14.26 


10.00 


10.00 


25.29 


99.27 


140.00 


1.58 


5.40 


3.00 


4.00 


2.40 


65.00 


108.30 


1.75 


84.00 


126.35 


20.00 


75.00 


25.00 


75.00 


3.20 


167.14 


8.00 


15.00 


2.25 


141.66 


6.00 


215.00 


162.45 


5.75 


142.50 


2.20 


36.40 


16.00 


.45 


16.00 


108.30 


108.30 


.85 


85.74 


1.00 


.29 


25.49 


30.18 


153.42 


.75 


150.00 


3.50 


.75 


2.25 


141.66 


7.50 


.19 


25.00 


22.50 


187.00 


37,606.03Lst 


10.00 


117.32 


65.00 


.50 


1.50 


85.74 


135.37 


24.45 


10.00 


7.80 


18.35 


4.80 


10.00 


15.00 


307.68 


3.00 


10.00 


62.00 


110.10 


108.30 


117.32 


8.00 


39.00 


65.00 


62.50 


50.00 


6.00 


142.50 


31.00 


3.20 


4.40 


117.32 


5.06 



Dec. 18, '34 52,453.94* 



85.74 

21.18 

29.80 

7.65 

90.25 

34.00 

108.30 

36.00 

81.22 

142.50 

76.71 

108.30 

76.00 

8.00 

16.47 

3.00 

5.00 

1.50 

8.00 

.75 

150.00 

130.64 
99.27 
45.00 
12.00 
11.40 
2.60 
35.76 

103.60 

6.00 
21.00 
48.00 
10.00 
.50 
25.00 

146 



6,872.10Dec. 19, '34 55,985.65 
Dec. 20, '34 18,037.30" 



Dec. 21, '34 16,565.12 



BALA1 


4CE FROM L 


AST STATED 


1ENT 








Checks 


Paid 




Deposits 


Balance 


16.00 


.75 


1.50 










29.81 


8.42 


12.00 










141.66 


8.00 


6.08 










8.00 


10.00 


4.00 










15.93 


8.10 


6.00 










8.88 








Dec. 


22, '34 


15,635.51* 


1, 656.2 lLst 






3,258.68 Dec. 


24,34 


17,237.98* 


789.44Lst 








Dec. 


26, '34 


16,448.54* 


10.00 


.32 


1.54 










12.00 


10.00 


48.42 










3.60 


11.05 


60.00 










50.00 


3.00 


40.00 










1.148.16 


11.80 


10.00 










5.66 


12.00 


.50 










1.67 


2.50 


6.00 










20.00 


8.42 


8.00 










135 37 








Dec. 


27, '34 


14,828.53* 


106.00 


.50 


1.67 










3.00 


30.00 


2.50 










11.00 


11.00 


10.00 










67.50 


6.66 


6.66 










40.20 


33.34 


3.00 










1.00 








. Dec. 


28, '34 


14,494.50* 


18.00 


20.00 


10.00 










.27 


1.50 


8.40 










.50 


.50 


117.32 










7.65 


3.00 






Dec. 


29, '34 


14,307.36* 


42.27 


3.00 


3.00 










2.00 


5.00 


1.00 










13.00 


144.40 


1.15 










100.00 


100.00 


10.00 










10 00 


6.50 






Dec. 


31, '34 


13,866.04* 


62.50 


25.00 


45.00 


3,361.08 






12.00 


2.65 


1.21 










25.11 








Dec. 


31, '34 


17,053.65* 



147 



REPORT OF THE TAX COLLECTOR 

For the Year Ending December 31, 1934 

I herewith submit my annual report as Tax Collector for the Town 
of Chelmsford for the year ending December 31, 1934. 

At this time I say to the voters that the problem of reducing the 
amount of our tax bills should have the co-operation of very citizen in 
this Town, as it seems to be increasingly hard for our tax payers to 
meet the amounts levied upon their property, therefore I further say that 
it is the duty of every tax payer to study the various articles in the 
warrant for the annual town meeting which is to be held the second 
Monday in March in the upper Town Hall at Chelmsford Centre and 
also study the report of the Finance Committee's recommendations as 
set forth in the budget under article two which will be found under their 
report elsewhere in this report and come to town meeting prepared to 
eliminate any expenditure which is not absolutely essential. 

The tax bills for the year 1935 according to the General Laws must 
be in the hands of the tax payers not later than June 14, 1935, fifty 
percent of this bill is payable on July 1, 1935 and the balance is pay- 
able on November 1, 1935, if the bill is not paid in full on 
November 1, 1935, the interest will revert back to October 1, 
1935. If there are any questions regarding tax bills for the year the 
Tax Collector will be glad to answer them. 

Any question regarding the assessment of property should be pre- 
sented to the local Board of Assessors, who hold their regular meeting 
the first Wednesday in each month, at their office in the Chelmsford Centre 
Town Hall. 

The Assessors' commitment to me of taxes, State, County and Town 
and also Motor Vehicle Excise taxes for 1934 is made up as follows : 

State and County Tax : 

State Tax $ 9,500.00 

Auditing Municipal Accounts 83.14 

Parks and Reservations 72.92 

Hospital and Home Care of C. W. Veterans and 

Widows 100.00 



County Tax : 

Tax $ 9,450.95 



Town Tax : 

Maturing Notes and Interest $ 17,282.48 

Interest on Temporary Loans 2,000.00 

Overlay Deficits : 

1931 342.36 

1932 „ 1.292 66 



148 



$ 9,756.06 



$ 9.450.95 



Overlay 1934 3,156.12 

Town Appropriations 1934 249,935.18 

$274,008 80 

Total : $293,215.81 

Less : 

Estimated Receipts State and Town $ 67,940.21 

Free Cash 20,000.00 

Less Error in 1931 and 1932 Overlay Deficit 1.00 

$ 87,941.21 

Committed by Assessors October 8, 1934 $205,274.60 

Additional Commitment December 21, 1934 529.20 

Total Town Taxes Committed by Assessors for 1934 $205,803.80 

TAXES OF 1934 

As Committed by Assessors $205,803.80 

Refunds After Payment 78.00 

$205,881.89 

Cash Paid Treasurer $125,602.56 

Abated 438 25 

Uncollected January 1, 1935 '. 79,840.99 

$205,881.80 

TAXES OF 1933 

Uncollected January 1, 1934 $ 93,048.85 

Added Commitment 18.00 

Refunds 41.57 

Auditor's Adjustment 184.92 

$ 93,29334 

Cash Paid Treasurer $ 64,576.19 

Auditor's Adjustment 97.60 

Abated 325.60 

Uncollected January 1, 1935 28,293.95 

$ 93,29334 

TAXES OF 1932 

Uncollected January 1, 1934 $ 37,934.71 

Auditor's Adjustment 150.00 

Abatement Cancelled 6.00 

Correction (Wrong Entry) 207.65 

Overpaid by Collector 71.76 

$ 38,370 12 

Cash Paid Treasurer $ 31,833.16 

Auditor's Adjustment 239.89 

149 



Tax Titles 5,234.62 

Abated 1,015.45 

Correction (Wrong Entry) 47.00 



MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE TAX 1932 
Uncollected January 1, 1934 $ 56 25 

Paid Treasurer $ 56.25 



MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE TAX 1933 

Uncollected January 1, 1934 $ 2,166.48 

Additional Commitment 30.15 

Refunds 70.83 

Auditor's Adjustment 20.14 



Paid Treasurer $ 1,811.49 

Abated 404.60 

Auditor's Adjustment 21.03 

Uncollected January 1, 1935 50.48 



MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE TAX 1934 

Commitment by Assessors March 9, 1934 $ 2,913.23 

Commitment by Assessors March 24, 1934 2,026.27 

Commitment by Assessors April 17, 1934 1,203.16 

Commitment by Assessors June 24, 1934 2,469.83 

Commitment by Assessors Sept. 18, 1934 1,138.31 

Commitment by Assessors Dec. 3, 1934 711.78 

Refunds 388.68 



Paid Treasurer $ 8,757.30 

Abated 501.80 

Uncollected January 1, 1935 1,592.16 



INTERESTS AND COSTS 

Interests $ 6,799.79 

Costs 99.10J 



Paid Treasurer, Interest 1930 Taxes $ 7.74 

Paid Treasurer, Interest 1931 Taxes 19.45 

Paid Treasurer, Interest 1932 Taxes 3,482.60 

Paid Treasurer, Interest 1933 Taxes 2,827.89 

Paid Treasurer, Interest 1934 Taxes 114.56 



150 



$ 38,370.12 

$ 56.25 
$ 56.25 



$ 2,287.60 



$ 2,287.60 



$ 10,851.26 



$ 10,851.26 



$ 6,898.89 



Paid Treasurer, Interest on Tax Titles 210.15 

Paid Treasurer, Interest on 1932 Excise Taxes 3.36 

Paid Treasurer, Interest on 1933 Excise Taxes 98.97 

Paid Treasurer, Interest on 1934 Excise Taxes 35.07 

Paid Treasurer Costs on Taxes 99.10 

$ 6,89889 

HAROLD C. PETTERSON, 

Collector of Taxes 
For Town of Chelmsford, Mass. 



NORTH CHELMSFORD FIRE DISTRICT 
TAX COLLECTOR'S REPORT 

For Year Ending December 31, 1934 

TAXES OF 1927 
Uncollected January 1, 1934 $ 1.95 



Abated by Assessors $ 1.95 

TAXES OF 1928 

Uncollected January 1, 1934 $ 1.80 

Abated by Assessors $ 1.80 

TAXES OF 1929 

Uncollected January 1, 1934 $ 17.64 

Abated by Assessors $ 17.64 



TAXES OF 1931 

Uncollected January 1, 1934 , $ 33.60 

Collected in 1934 $ 10.07 

Abated by Assessors 14.65 

Uncollected January 1, 1935 8.88 



151 



1.95 
1.95 

1.80 
1.80 

17.64 

17.64 



TAXES OF 1930 

Uncollected January 1, 1934 $ 5.96 

$ 5.96 

Abated by Assessors $ 5.96 

$ 5.96 



33 60 



33.60 



TAXES OF 1934 

Committed by Assessors December 1, 1934 $ 2,808.52 

$ 2,808.52 

Collected in 1934 $ 1,836.15 

Abated by Assessors 2.25 

Uncollected January 1, 1935 '... 970.12 

$ 2,808.52 

HAROLD C. PETTERSON, 

Collector. 

EAST CHELMSFORD WATER DISTRICT 
TAX COLLECTOR'S REPORT 

For Year Ending December 31, 1934 

Committed by Assessors December 1, 1934 $ 2,435.83 

$ 2,435.83 

Collected in 1934 $ 917.01 

Abated by Assessors 1.00 

Uncollected January 1, 1935 1,517.82 

$ 2,435.83 

HAROLD C. PETTERSON, 

Collector. 



152 



REPORT OF TRUSTEES OF THE ADAMS LIBRARY 

The trustees met on February 17, 1934 and organized with Albert H. 
Davis as chairman, Mrs. Luella H. S. Clark as secretary, and Frederick 
A. P. Fiske as treasurer. 

Mr. Fiske and Mr. Davis were appointed to approve all bills except 
for books, and Mr. Davis and Mrs. Clark to approve bills for books. 

Mrs. Ida A. Jefts was reappointed as librarian and Mrs. Aldegonde 
Peterson as assistant librarian. 

The services of Miss Marianna Hemenway were engaged for two 
hours each Saturday to assist in the children's department. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ALBERT H. DAVIS, 
LUELLA PI. S. CLARK, 
LOTTIE L. SNOW, 
FRED W. PARK, 
FRANCES CLARK, 
FREDERICK A. P. FISKE. 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER OF THE BOARD OF 
TRUSTEES OF THE ADAMS LIBRARY 

January 1, 1934 — December 31, 1934 

RECEIPTS 

Rent from the Garden Club $ 12 00 

Rent from the Historical Society 4.00 

From Sale of Three Histories of the Town of Chelmsford 15.00 

From Fines on Books 16.21 

Amount Withdrawn from the Amos F. Adams Fund 200.00 

Amount Withdrawn from the George Cemetery Fund - 30.00 

Amount Withdrawn from the Adams Emerson Fund 40.00 

Amount Withdrawn from the Joseph Warren Fund 115 83 

Balance on Hand from Last Year's Report r 148.84 

Total $ 581.88 

EXPENDITURES 

Books $ 130.01 

Care of George Cemetery Lot - 30.00 

Premium on Treasurer's Bond - 20.83 

Town Treasurer for Amounts Received for Rent, Fines and 

Sale of Histories , 47.21 

Painting Outside Woodwork on Library Building and Paint 101.50 

Binding Books 30.33 

Salaries of Library Employees 65.05 

New England Telephone - : 4.25 

Rent of Safety Deposit Box 5.50 

Check Taxes .24 



$ 434.92 



153 



Balance on Hand in Union Old Lowell National Bank 146.96 



Total $ 581 88 

Respectfully submitted, 

FREDERICK A. P. FISKE, 

Treasurer of Board of Trustees. 



REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN OF THE 
ADAMS LIBRARY 

Circulation for 1934 18,742 

Magazines 947 

Non Fiction 3,608 

Fiction . 14,187 

Books Sent to West Chelmsford 1,376 

Magazines Sent to West Chelmsford 23 

Books Sent to South Chelmsford '. 1,102 

Pictures Borrowed from Library Collection 8 

New Borrowers 174 

Books Borrowed from Division of Public Libraries 31 

State Certificates Awarded from Sept. to Dec, 1934 164 

New Books Purchased 207 

Received from Fines $ 79.10 

Received from Books Lost or Damaged 4.37 

Received from Transient Borrowers 3.00 

$ 86.47 

Paid for Desk Supplies $ 68.26 

Money Refunded Transient Borrowers 2.00 

Balance Handed Treasurer 16.21 



86.47 



IDA A. JEFTS, 

Librarian. 



154 



NORTH CHELMSFORD LIBRARY CORPORATION 

TREASURER'S REPORT 

North Chelmsford, December 31, 1934. 

RECEIPTS 

Balance on Hand January 1, 1934 $ 54.89 

Town Appropriation 1,200.00 

Librarian's Fines 7.00 

$ 1,261.89 

EXPENDITURES 

Librarian's Salary $ 300.00 

Assistant Librarian and Janitor 115.92 

Assistant 68.71 

Lighting 21.89 

Fuel _ 96.25 

Books 465.34 

Magazines 19.00 

Binding Books : 81.66 

Repairs — '... 2.33 

Miscellaneous Supplies and Expenses 47.08 

$ 1,218.18 

Balance in Treasury 43.71 

$ 1,261.89 

Respectfully submitted, 

BERTHA M. WHITWORTH, 
Treasurer. 

NORTH CHELMSFORD LIBRARY CORPORATION 

North Chelmsford, Mass., December 31, 1934. 

The Trustees of the North Chelmsford Library submit the following 
report for the year 1934 : 

The circulation for the year was 17,499. 

New books added, 315. 

Number of sessions, 148. 

A large number of the books have been rebound and put in circulation, 
also quite a few books were replaced. 

At one of our meetings Miss Bertha Swain was elected to succeed 
Miss Gertrude Jones. 

Many new borrowers have been added to our list. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ARTHUR O. WHEELER, President, 
BERTHA A, SWAIN, 
NELLIE L. BUTTERFIELD. 

155 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF POLICE 

December 31, 1934 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen : 
Gentlemen : 

I respectfully submit the annual report of the Chelmsford Police De- 
partment for the year ending December 31, 1934. 

DEPARTMENT ROSTER 
Chief : Bernard F. McGovern. 

Patrolmen : Allan H. Adams, Winslow P. George, Ralph J. Hulslander. 
Special Police : Leo A. Boucher, Robert DeLong, Basil Larkin, Wil- 
liam Reid. 

Special Police (Emergencies) : John McEnaney, Allan Kidder, Gilbert 
Perham, Charles Searles. 

Special Police (School Duty) : Wallace Greig, John Wrigley. 
Policewoman : Mrs. Mae Lewis. 

OFFENCES FOR WHICH ARRESTS WERE MADE 
CRIME AGAINST PERSON 

Male Female Total 

Assault : 3 3 

Bastardy 2 2 

Manslaughter 5 5 

Total 10 10 

CRIME AGAINST PUBLIC ORDER 

Male Female Total 

Auto Law Violations 25 25 

Disturbing the Peace 1 1 

Drunkenness 44 2 46 

Delinquent 5 5 

Escaped Prisoners 10 1 

Counterfeiting 2 2 

Lewdness 10 1 

Liquor Law Violation 10 1 

Non-Support 2 2 

Safe Keeping 10 1 

Suspicious Person 3 3 

Violation of Probation 5 2 7 

Stubborn Child 1 1 

• Total : 92 4 96 

CRIMES AGAINST PROPERTY 

Breaking and Entering 10 1 

Larceny 8 8 

Warrants Served for Outside Police 3 3 

Total 12 12 

156 



RECAPITULATION 
OFFENCES 

Male Female Total 

Against the Person 9 1 10 

Against Property 12 12 

Against Public Order 92 4 96 

Total 113 5 118 

PERSONS ARRESTED 

DISPOSITIONS 

Continued ■. '. 2 

Committed to the House of Correction 7 

Committed to Worcester State Hospital 1 

Committed to Lyman School 3 

Returned to Institutions 1 

Fined 35 

Released 19 

Returned to Parents' 7 

Not Guilty 12 

Probation 12 

Held for Federal Court 4 

Filed 12 

Unknown Out of Town Warrants 3 

Total _ 118 

POLICE ATTENDANCE AT FIRES 
Alarms - 29 

POLICE TELEPHONE STATIONS 

Chelmsford Centre 7510 

North Chelmsford 7510 

Chief's Residence '. 3693 

MISCELLANEOUS CASES .RECEIVING POLICE ATTENTION 

Accidents Investigated 160 

Assisted Other Officers - 51 

Buildings Found Open and Unsecured, ■ Owners Notified 33 

Complaints Investigated - - 568 

Cruelty to Animals, Cases Investigated Assisted by the Lowell 

Humane Society - 24 

Defective Places in Streets Reported : 6 

Dogs and Cats Hit by Auto ~ - - 21 

Dogs and Cats Shot and Disposed of — - 56 

Communications Received and Answered 216 

Fires Extinguished Without Alarm 4 

Attendance at Court, Criminal 298 

Attendance at Court, Civil 14 

Injured and Sick Persons Taken to Hospitals 31 

Attendance at Halls ~ - 64 

157 



Lights Furnished for Dangerous Places 9 

Lights Found Burning in Buildings 8 

Street Obstructions Removed 7 

( )n Special Duty 43 

Ambulance Calls S 

Telegrams Delivered 20 

Summons Served for Out of Town Police 22 

Out of Town Police Calls 8 

Complaints on Dogs 60 

Night Lights Found Out 21 

Reported on Probation 208 

Persons Found Dead 4 

Drowning Accidents 2 

Beacon Found Out ...... .. 7 

Escorts Given 23 

Electric Wires Down 5 

Street Lights Out and Reported 588 

Stolen Cars Recovered 9 

Visits at Office, Centre (Personal) 1549 

Visits at Office, North (Personal) 527 

Transfer of Cars Recorded 563 

Registrations Seized for Registry 15 

Registrations Investigated 213 

Phone Calls Received at Offices 7012 

Personal Calls at Home 1287 

Phone Calls Received at Homes - 3138 

Dwelling Houses Reported Closed 11 

Pistol Permits Issued ..._ 87 

Missing Persons Reported 14 

Property Stolen _ $ 2,054.13 

Property Recovered 1,822.00 

Property Lost 387.50 

Property Found 385.00 

Dogs Lost, Valued 175.00 

Dogs Recovered 150.00 

MILEAGE COVERED BY POLICE 

Miles 

On Motorcycle 6,756 

By Automobile, Police Car 21,090 

By Automobile, Private Cars 7.508 

MOTOR VIOLATIONS CHECKED BUT NO COURT 
ACTION TAKEN 

Failing to Keep to Right When View Is Obstructed 114 

Failing to Keep to Right of Traffic Beacons 4 

Improper Operation 16 

Improper Lights 246 

158 



No License in Possession 41 

No Registration in Possession 34 

Passing Cars on Right S 

Speeding '. 125 

Violation of Stop Sign 132 

Violation of Parking Ordinance 38 

Requests for Suspension of License and Registration 5 

Warnings _ 779 

Operator Had Been Drinking 7 

Improper Registration ..,„ 12 

• REPORT OF POLICE WOMAN 

Bernard F. McGovern, Chief of Police! 
Dear Sir : 

I wish to submit the report of my duties as police woman for the 
year ending December 31, 1934: 

Cases Investigated on Accounts of Complaints to police 18 

Cases investigated on Account of complaints to police woman 11 

Calls at Homes in interest of Women and Children 9 

Calls at Homes for Follow-up Work 24 

Hospital Cases 1 

Clinic Cases 13 

Neglected Children ..._ 18 

Cases Referred to Agencies ... - 12 

Wives Reporting Trouble with Husbands : 4 

Husbands Reporting Trouble with Wives 2 

Questionable Persons Investigated _ 7 

Questionable Persons- Warned Regarding Habits of Behavior 5 

Girls Warned Against Soliciting Auto Rides 5 ' 

Men in Automobiles Warned Regarding Accosting High Schools 

Girls - 2 

Stubborn Girls Given Advice and Returned Home 2 

Missing Persons Found 1 

At this time I wish to thank you and the men of the department for 
the fine co-operation they have extended in the course of the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MAE S. LEWIS, R. N., 

Police Woman. 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 

STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES AND RECEIPTS 

EXPENDITURES 

Chief's Salary and Expenses $ 2,000.00 

Patrolmen 5,092.87 

Special Police 53.83 

School Police 270.50 

Police at Polling Booths 52.71 

159 



Special Crime Investigation 32.70 

Equipment 78.43 

Repairs to Motorcycles 100.10 

Telephones and Toll Call Service 257.97 

Traffic Lights Electric Service 9.57 

Traffic Lights Upkeep 3.25 

Office Supplies '. 9.35 

Supplies and Repairs to Police Car 126.41 

Gasoline and Oil 346.05 

Keeping Prisoners 44.00 

Stationery, Forms, Records, Postage and Printing 115.53 

Registration for Police Car 3.00 

Oil for Heat at North Office 2.40 

Total Expenditures $ 8,598.67 

RECEIPTS 

income Received from Court Fines $ 457.16 

Toll Calls 1.65 

Received from Damage to Automobile 18.00 

Gun Permit Fees 21.75 

Ambulance Service 5.00 

$ 503.56 
Returned to General Fund 1.33 

Total Receipts '. $ 504.89 504.89 

Total Cost to Town...... - $ 8,093.78 

RECOMMENDATIONS 

To keep up the high standard and efficiency of the department I feel 
that it is necessary to purchase a new police car this >ear. The time for 
using motorcycles for police service is passing rapidly. In order to be able 
to apprehend the criminal of today police must be prepared and have proper 
facilities to transport the extra equipment needed. By this I mean that 
an officer in a car with radio can accurately and efficiently take care of any 
violation of the law which he may meet with. 

I also recommend that some provisions be made for the setting up of a 
lockup in Chelmsford, to be used for the caring of persons arrested. At the 
present time we are using the facilities at the Lowell Police Station. I feel 
that the money we are paying the City of Lowell for this service could be 
put towards the maintenance of one for our own town. 

I wish to acknowledge again my real appreciation for the assistance and 
co-operation extended me by the Honorable Board of Selectmen, also I am 
extremely grateful to the citizens, to the officers of the Lowell District 
Court for the cordial and helpful attitude they have extended me. I com- 
mend my comrades for their loyalty and co-operation. 
Respectfully submitted, 

BERNARD F. McGOVERN. 



Chief of Police. 



160 



REPORT OF FISH AND GAME WARDEN 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen, 
Chelmsford, Mass. 
Gentlemen : 

I herewith submit my first annual report of my duties as Fish and 
Game Warden for the year ending December 31, 1934. 

Fishing and Hunting Licenses Inspected 93 

Licenses Seized from Non-Citizens 1 

Warnings to Juveniles . 4 

Complaints Received and Investigated 14 

Arrests and Convictions 2 

Fines $20.00 

With the co-operation of the State Department of Conservation the 
following amount of fish and game have been liberated for propagation 
in the town during the past year, with the assistance of the restocking 
committee of the South Chelmsford Rod and Gun Club. 

Pheasants - 272 

Quail 60 

Brook Trout . : .... 1600 

Pond Fish (White and Yellow Perch, and Crappeys) 3000 

In conclusion I wish to express my appreciation to the sportsmen of 
the town, members of the South Chelmsford Rod and Gun Club and Dis- 
trict Deputy Warden Harold Crosby, for the splendid co-operation I have 
received from them in the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

RALPH J. HULSLANDER, 

Fish and Game Warden. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH 

Officers and Citizens of the Town of Chelmsford: 

The records of the past year show that the Board of Health of 
Chelmsford has completed the most active year in the history of the 
board. 

The number of school children to receive the Schick and Immuniza- 
tion tests has increased more than three hundred percent since the 
introduction of the use of Toxin-Anti-Toxm into the schools of Chelms- 
ford in 1927, and more than one hundred and fifty percent more children 
received the test this year than did last year. 

There were two hundred and one more children examined this year 
.by the school dentist and a noticeable increase in the amount of work 
done. 

All this means that a great deal of credit is due our agent, Mrs. Mae 
Lewis, who, through her untiring efforts has raised the health standard 
of both school and pre'-school children to an almost hundred percent 
record. 

161 



The value of the Schick test and immunization and dental clinics in 
the town is inestimable. 

Citizens of the town, parents of pre-school and school children, will 
he able to gain some idea of the worth of an agent such as Mrs. Lewis, 
by carefully reading her report which she lias prepared and submitted to 
this board. 

Because of conditions at the Westlands dump last spring, it was 
found necessary to appoint a caretaker there. Again the board urges 
the co-operation of the residents in that section in bringing about better con- 
ditions in this dumping area. This is a civic duty and a matter for the personal 
co-operation of every individual. 

The report of the Plumbing Inspector, Milk Inspector, show an in- 
crease in activity during the past year in both departments. 

The report of the Inspector of Slaughtering shows that there was a 
considerable increase in the number of animals slaughtered in the town dur- 
ing the year 1934. 

Residents of the North Village are to be commended on the splendid 
co-operation which they have given the board in observing the regulations 
and restrictions provided for the dumping area in this section. In the 
future, however, all residents of the North Village are requested to 
refrain from dumping on land adjacent to the Varney Playground at the 
termination of Adams street. 

In submitting this report, I wish to thank those who have been asso- 
ciated with me during my term of office, the agent, Mrs. Mae Lewis, the 
other members of the board, Dr. Var"ney and Dr. Scoboria, school 
physicians, and the Police Department, all of whom by their splendid co- 
operation have made my service to the town a pleasure. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JAMES KIBERD, Jr., 

Chairman, Board of Health. 
December 31, 1934. 



REPORT OF THE AGENT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH 

Mr. James Kiberd, 

Chairman of Board of Health. 

Dear Sir : 

The following is a report for the year 1934 : 

Scarlet Fever 5 

Measles 90 

Tuberculosis 1 

Whooping Cough 6 

Chicken Pox 2 

Trachoma 1 

Lobar Pneumonia 1 

Mumps 1 

Dog-bite 9 

Fox-bite 1 

162 



Erysipelas 1 

Diphtheria 1 

(This pupil had not received either immunization or Schick test.) 

Investigations 186 

Sanitary Visits , 47 

When contagious diseases are reported in the schools, the school 
physician and the nurse examine those who have been in contact with 
the diseased child; then, any books the child may have had are taken by 
the nurse, fumigated, and returned to the places from where they were 
taken. Pupils having colds have been excluded for the purpose of pro- 
tecting children with whom they come in contact. 

Several trips were made with patients to the Middlesex County Sani- 
torium, Tewksbury State Hospital, and to the G. U. clinic in Lowell. 
Pupils Schicked in May who were immunized in October 

1933 350 

Negative 345 

Positive 5 

These five children who were positive in May were reimmunized in 
October, 1934, along with 221 pupils, teachers, and pre-school children. Out 
of the 1242 children in the elementary schools and 408 in High school, a 
very small percentage have not received the Toxin-Anti-Toxin. 

Thus far. the Department of Public Health has not conducted the 
annual follow-up clinic, but I expect that they will do so in the early 
part of the year. 

Dr. Archibald from the Department of Public Health visited several 
times during the year. 

Dr. Ritter. the school dentist, has completed the following work : 

Number Examined by School Dentist 1011 

Permanent Fillings 614 

Temporary Fillings , 480 

Teeth Treated 210 

Permanent Extractions 41 

Temporary Extractions 308 

Cleanings - 604 

Many children unable to pay for treatment of teeth were given care 
through the generosity of the various Parent-Teacher Associations in 
the town. 

I wish to thank everyone for their kind and excellent co-operation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MAE S. LEWIS. R. N., 

Agent for Board of Health. 
December 31, 1934. 



163 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE MILK INSPECTION DIVISION 

December 31, 1934. 
Board of Health, 
Chelmsford, Mass. 
Gentlemen : 

I have the honor to present the report of the Milk Inspection Division 
for the year ending December 31, 1934. 

Five stores were registered to sell oleomargarine. 

Three licenses were issued to milk dealers to maintain establishments 
for the pasteurization of milk. 

Milk licenses were issued to forty-four stores and nineteen distributors. 

Seventy-four dollars, collected for license fees, were paid to the 
Town Treasurer. 

Four hundred twenty-six dairy farms supplied Chelmsford with milk 
in 1934. They were scored and classified according to the minimum uni- 
form requirements of the Milk Regulation Board. Several milk houses 
or milk rooms were built ; many cooling tanks were installed ; and much 
milk equipment was replaced in order to comply with the regulations of 
the Milk Regulation Board. Several dairy farms were shut off from the 
market for short periods for violation of the requirements. There has 
been a commendable and co-operative spirit manifested by the most of 
the producers of milk in trying to comply with these new regulations. 

There were seized from dealers eight hundred fifty-four chemical; 
four hundred thirty-nine bacterial ; four hundred thirty-nine sediment ; and 
three hundred twenty-seven temperature, samples of milk. 

The numerical average for the chemical samples for the year was : 
Total solids. 13.05%; fat, 4.07%. 

The medium bacterial counts for the year were : 

Pasteurized milk, 9,800 per cubic centimeter. 

Raw milk, . 12,000 per cubic centimeter. 

Cream, 15,000 per cubic centimeter. 

There were seized from producers three hundred twenty-eight chemical ; 
three hundred twenty-six bacterial ; eighty-seven sediment ; and one hundred 
ninety-three temperature, samples of milk. The median bacterial count 
was 14,000 per cubic centimeter. 

One hundred forty-two inspections of milk dealers plants were made. 

Approximately one thousand nine hundred sixty-four quarts of milk 
and sixty-one quarts of cream are consumed daily. 

59.47 per cent of the milk sold is pasteurized ; 40.53 per cent raw. 

19.00 per cent is sold from stores ; 81 per cent from wagons. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MELVIN F. MASTER. 



164 



REPORT OF THE INSPECTOR OF SLAUGHTERING 

January 1, 1935. 
To the Board of Health, 
Chelmsford, Mass. 
Gentlemen : 

I submit the following report of animals slaughtered by licensed 
butchers and owners at their premises. From January 1, 1934 to January 
1, 1935. Have been inspected by me. 

Cattle 892 

Calves 911 

Hogs 466 

Sheep 2806 

Goats 4 

Of these were condemned: 

Cattle 9 

Calves 85 

Sheep 3 

Hogs 4 

All inspections have been reported to the State authorities. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. C. GALE, 

Inspector of Slaughtering. 



REPORT OF MEAT INSPECTOR 

Chelmsford, Mass., January 1, 1935. 

To the Board of Health : 

Gentlemen : 

The folowing is a report of the animals slaughtered in Chelmsford from 

Dec. 1, 1934, to Jan 1, 1935: 

Cattle 30 

Calves 33 

Hogs 117 

Sheep 250 

Of these were condemned: 

Hogs 1 



Respectfully submitted, 

W. C. GALE, 



Meat Inspector. 



165 



REPORT OF THE INSPECTOR OF MARKETS 

January 1. 1935. 
To the Board of Health, 
Chelmsford, Mass., 
Gentlemen : 

I submit the following report on markets, butcher and fish carts. 
I have found them in good condition, although 1 have condemned 1058 
pounds of meat and 75 pounds of fowl. They were seized and confiscated. 

Respectfully submitted, 
W. C. GALE, ' 

Inspector of Meats. 



INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS REPORT 

Chelmsford. Mass., January 1. 1935. 
Board of Selectmen, 
Chelmsford, Mass. 
Gentlemen : 

The report of the work done by this department during the year 1934 
under the direction of the Division of Animal Industry, Department of 
Conservation until December 1, and then under the Division of Livestock- 
Disease Control, Department of Agriculture, follows : 

The annual inspection of all animals ordered during the latter part 
of the year has been completed and a detailed report submitted to the 
Division of Livestock Disease Control. 

There are 207 stables, four more than last year in which were found 
722 dairy cows, 213 young cattle and 28 bulls, making a total of 963 head, 
54 more than last year. Thirteen of these stables contained only 
swine, sheep or goats, while 79 stables were occupied by only one cow 
each. 

There were also 396 swine, 10 sheep and 3 goats. 

All cattle in town are now under State and Federal supervision for 
tuberculosis eradication. Twenty-nine cows reacted to the test and were 
killed, they were condemned in seventeen different stables ; these stables 
were properly cleaned and disinfected. One hundred twenty-two cows 
and six bulls for dairy purposes, six beef cattle and 26 calves were shipped 
into town during the year on permits issued by the State Division. All 
were identified and released upon proof of satisfactory test charts and 
certificates showing that they came from herds free from Bangs disease 
during the year previous to entry into Massachusetts. 

Twenty-nine dog bite cases were investigated. Twenty-five dogs and 
one cat were quarantined for a two weeks observation period and all 
except the cat and one dog were released as no rabies developed. The 
cat and dog were in contact with a rabid dog and were killed soon after 
they were quarantined. This rabid dog, the only one in town this year, 
fortunately bit no one before being killed. 

Persons desiring to ship cattle into town from other states should 
get a permit from the Division of Livestock Disease Control, 100 Nashua 

166 



street, Boston, to accompany the shipment and secure a statement from the 
seller stating that the cattle came from a herd that was free from Bang's 
disease during the past year. Upon arrival of such cattle notify the in- 
spector of animals. Dairy cattle owners would do well to learn more 
about what the State and Federal governments are doing to control Bang's 
disease, which is causing a great loss to the dairy industry. 

The State will make free blood tests and the Federal authorities will 
test your animals and will pay you a sum not exceeding twenty dollars plus 
salvage for a grade cow that reacts to the test. See your local inspector 
for details about Bang's disease or mastitis. 

T wish to express my appreciation to Mrs. Mae Lewis, School Nurse, 
Police Department. Health Department and physicians for their co-opera- 
tion in dog bite cases. 

ARNOLD C. PERHAM, 

Inspector of Animals. 



REPORT OF THE PLUMBING INSPECTOR 

Chelmsford, Mass., December 31, 1934 
Board of Health, 
Chlemsford, Mass. 

Following is a report of the plumbing work done for the year ending 
December 31, 1934. 

Whole Number of Applications for Permits to Do Plumbing.. 50 

New Houses 10 

Old Houses '. 40 

Total 50 

Inspections 109 

Tests 38 

Total 147 

Following is a list of the various plumbing fixtures installed: 

Water Closets 56 

Lavatories 40 

Bath Tubs : 36 

Wash Trays 17 

Sinks 34 

Drinking Fountains 2 

Shower Baths .- 2 

Floor Drains 2 

Total 189 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES N. MIDWOOD, 

Plumbing Inspector. 



167 



REPORT OF THE WORK OF THE 

MIDDLESEX COUNTY EXTENSION SERVICE 

IN CHELMSFORD DURING 1934 

The following is a report of the work done in this town by the 
Middlesex County Extension Service during the year 1934. 

Chelmsford dairy farmers attended every one of the dairy meetings 
in the weekly series in Concord last February and March. Farmers were 
advised on dairy replacements, feeding and growing legumes. Following 
the T. B. test clean-up there is a growing interest in dairying. 

Poultrymen have been assisted in brooder house troubles, range man- 
agement and housing. Assistance has been given in diagnosing disease 
and advice given for its control. 

A few boys have attended the informal discussions on agriculture at 
the Y. M. C. A. in Lowell conducted by the Extension Service. 

Twenty-three farm visits were made on fruit and market garden subjects. 

Moving pictures of apple picking and packing, cost figures and details 
of production were presented at a winter meeting attended by 26 fruit 
growers. 

The discussion of vegetable diseases and fertilizers was attended by 
eight market gardeners. 

A C. W. A. project on cutting neglected fruit trees was aided. The 
Extension Service has been emphasizing the danger of neglected trees in 
breeding pests such as the apple maggot. 

Ten 4-H clubs took part in the exhibit and program at the Centre 
last spring as a finish to the winter's program. During the summer six 
garden clubs were carried on. Isabelle Hamilton of the North and Frank 
Burton of the South were each awarded a week at Camp Gilbert (leader- 
ship camp at Amherst). 

Winners of the two-day trip to Amherst were Esther Quinnette of 
East ; Marguerite Ferron, North ;* Eunice House, South ; Eva Kelly, Centre, 
and Mae Reno, West. These awards were made for good work and spirit 
shown during the last three years. The Middlesex North Agricultural 
Society awarded money prizes to excellent 4-H gardens in South, $10 to 
Anthony Niemasezyk, and $4 to Roger Calder ; in North, Magan Kras- 
necki, $3 ; in West, Earl Boutilier, $7. Mrs. Dewey Fish of the South 
was counselor at Camp Middlesex and taught metal work 

It should be remembered that the work of the Middlesex County Ex- 
tension Service is free to all citizens of the county who desire to participate 
in its work. It is organized primarily to serve farmers, homemakers and 
boys and girls residing in rural sections, but homemakers, back yard 
gardeners and boys and girls in villages may also avail themselves of this 
service. 

PERLEY W. KIMBALL. 



168 



REPORT OF CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 

January 17, 1935. 
To the Board of Selectmen, 
Chelmsford, Mass. 
Gentlemen : 

- The Cemetery Commissioners beg to submit the following report 
of Chelmsford cemeteries for year 1934 ending December 31. 

Forefathers : Number of the perpetual care lots have been graded 
and reseeded. The general upkeep has been very good. With the great 
amount of rain we have had this fall all the reseeding, and in fact the 
cemetery as a whole is in first class condition. There were four inter- 
ments in 1934. 

Pine Ridge : The general work has been done as in other seasons. 
Most of the lots that were sold in 1933 have been graded which improves 
the cemetery as a whole. Three lots have been sold this year. There were 
14 interments. 

Hart Pond : We are pleased to say at this time we are making 
improvements in this cemetery. The drives in the new section are 
being extended as per blue prints. The top soil is taken from these 
drives and used as a filler for the locations where lots are to be sold. 
This will, and already has made a well graded section. One lot sold and 
seven interments. 

West : General cleaning throughout. Planting of maple trees in 
old section. Replacing shrubbery that was winter killed last winter. 
Continuation of grading for new lots in new part. The tomb was also 
repaired. Mr. Taylor has kept the perpetual care lots in fine shape, 
and has top dressed them each fall. We will say that there has been 
improvement, and that the cemetery appearance is at all times in perfect 
condition. 

Riverside : This is one of our older cemeteries, and a difficult one 
to care for. We appreciate the fine way Mr. Cutler has cared for this 
cemetery and at the same time made improvements. The perpetual and 
annual care lots have been well looked after. 

Fairview : The general upkeep as in past seasons has been carried 
out. We believe each year there is a marked improvement in this 
cemetery. 

At this time we wish to speak of the fine work that has beene done 
in the cemeteries by the E. R. A. under the supervision of Engineer 
Flagg. Riverside, Fairview and Pine Ridge, the walls that have been 
erected and grading has made them so every one will be very much 
pleased and something the town can be proud of. The gates at Forefathers 
and Hart Pond are greatly appreciated. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ARTHUR O. WHEELER, 
BAYNARD C. DEAN, 
C. WESLEY LYONS, 

Cemetery Commissioners, 
Town of Chelmsford. 
By C. WESLEY LYONS, Clerk. 

169 



REPORT OF FORES! WARDEN 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen, 
Chelmsford, Mass. 
Gentlemen : 

I have the honor to submit the following report for the year ending 
December 31, 1934. 

During the past year we were called to extinguish one hundred and 
ten (110) forest and grass fires. All fires were extinguished before any 
damage was done to buildings, but in some cases buildings were in danger 
and only prompt arrival enabled us to prevent a more serious result. 

Most of the fires were caused by careless smokers ; some were of un- 
known cause. 

It is the wish of the State Forestry Department to have the Forest 
Warden or one of his deputies patrol the highways during the season 
when most forest fires occur ; this would enable the Forest Warden to 
prosecute violators and also extinguish many fires before they have burned 
over a large area, thereby lowering the cost to the town. 

Much credit is clue State Observer Claude Welch for the very helpful 
assistance he has given at all times. His alertness in locating fires in the 
town has saved us a great deal. 

Twelve hundred (1200) permits were issued for fires to be set in the 
open. Fine co-operation by the citizens of the town in caring for fires 
helped a great deal and very few got beyond their control. 

The equipment of this department is in very good condition at the 
present time, with the exception of the truck which is entirely worn out 
and must be replaced if we are to continue our work with the same 
efficiency. 

Besides the District Chiefs of the Fire Department the following 
Deputy Forest Wardens were appointed : Wallace A. Greig, Adam C 
Zabierek. Walter H. Merrill, Fred W. Merrill, Fred L. Fletcher and 
Robert Henderson. 

Tn conclusion I wish to express my appreciation to the Police De- 
ment, Fire Department and Deputy Forest Wardens for the fine assistance 
and co-operation that they have extended to me during the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GILBERT H. PERHAM. 

Forest Warden. 



170 



REPORT OF FIRE ENGINEERS 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen, 

Chelmsford, Mass. 
Gentlemen : 

The annual report of the Board of Fire Engineers is respectfully sub- 
mitted herewith : 

The Board is organized as follows: 
Harry L. Shedd, Chief 
John W. Dixon, Asst. Chief 
John M. Kemp, Asst. Chief 
with the latter also serving as Clerk of the Board. 

The Board appointed the following District Chiefs: 

Wilhelm T. Johnson District No. 1 

Joseph D. Ryan District No. 2 

Elmer Trull District No. 3 

Henry G. Quinn District No. 4 

Arthur W. House District No. 5 

Elmer Trull, Chief of District No. 3, resigned as of January 1, 1935, 
and the Board appointed in his place Walter Edwards. 

We regret to record this change, because Mr. Trull has been connected 
with the Department since its inception, and his zealous and faithful service 
has been of inestimable value to the town. 

Mr. Edwards, a brother of a former Chief, is fitted both by experience 
and ability to ably discharge the duties of his office, and will, we believe, 
make a splendid administrative officer. 

The roster remains practically the same as last year, and the men of the 
Department have given evidence by their performance both at fires and 
drills, in all sorts of weather and at all hours of the day and night, that we 
have a loyal and efficient fire-fighting force. 

The apparatus, equipment and quarters have been frequently inspected 
and kept in first-class condition. 

We have installed at South Chelmsford a new pumping engine which 
will adequately take care of this part of the town for some time to come. 
One of the features of this truck is the booster tank, which runs the entire 
length of the body, contains 250 gallons of water ready for instant use, and 
which can be played on a fire for 45 minutes without being renewed. This 
pumper has been characterized as one of the best of its kind in the state. 

The old wooden floor in the fire house at South Chelmsford has been 
taken up and a permanent floor of concrete laid down. 

With the generous assistance of the E. R. A. five water holes have been 
established at strategic position, and others are in contemplation. These 
reservoirs have at least a minimum capacity of 10,000 gallons even in the - 
■dry season. 

The East Chelmsford Water District is now nearing completion, and in 
order that the citizens of this community may have the full value of this 
work and obtain the lower rate of insurance it will be necessary for the 
town to install a 500-gallon pumper and 1000 feet of 2 l / 2 " double jacket 
hose. 

171 



This is to comply with the requirements of the New England Insurance 
Exchange, which is the rating authority. An article has been placed in the 
Town Warrant to cover this, and if approved will provide the town with 
adequate apparatus for some time, in addition to providing the citizens with 
lowest insurance possible. 

We are fortunate in noting only 94 alarms of fire. This includes brush 
fires and calls for assistance in surrounding towns and in Lowell. 

Our department has been commended for its services by the authorities 
of Dunstable, Westford and Carlisle, and our relations with the Department 
in Lowell are most friendly. 

This spirit of good will is a splendid asset to the town, and its effect in 
mutual aid extremely valuable in an emergency. 

We cannot close without gratefully acknowledging the services of the 
Chief and Officers of our excellent Police Department, the State Troopers 
and Motorcycle Police of the Lowell Department, all of whom have always 
responded to every call with hearty and intelligent service. 

HARRY L. SHEDD, 
JOHN W. DIXON, 
JOHN M. KEMP, 

Board of Fire Engineers. 



REPORT OF SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen, 
Chelmsford, Mass. 
Gentlemen : 

I respectfully submit my annual report as Sealer of Weights and 
Measures, for the year ending January 1, 1935. 

Number of Scales Tested and Sealed 144 

Number of Weights Tested and Sealed 265 

Number of Capacity Measures Tested and Sealed 17 

Number of Automatic Measuring Devices Tested and Sealed 345 

Respectfully submitted, 

WALLACE A. GREIG. 



172 



REPORT OF THE CHELMSFORD E. R. A., 1934 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen, 
Town of Chelmsford, Massachusetts. 
Honorable Sirs : 

As administrator of the Chelmsford E. R. A. I herewith submit 
to you and the citizens of the Town my report for the past year showing- 
such important details as, money received from the Federal Government, 
money spent by the Town for materials and equipment, projects com- 
pleted during the year, and projects we can expect for the future. Also 
I will show figures on the number of families receiving work relief 
wages during the year plus other data which tend to prove that our E. R. A. 
activities have kept down local welfare costs, have improved our public 
property, and have helped to sustain the morale of our people. 

PROJECTS CARRIED ON UNDER C. W. A. AND E. R. A. 
The projects completed and in course of construction since the 
beginning of the C. W. A. on November 27, 1933 are as follows : 

1. ROAD WORK 

(a) Eleven thousand feet of standard curbing laid and equal num- 
ber of feet of six foot gravel sidewalks made. This work was done on 
North Road (at Centre), Main Street, West Chelmsford, Gorham Street, 
Middlesex Street, and Chelmsford Street. 

(b) Pine Hill Road was widened and graveled to 16 feet for 
approximately 3^2 miles. This area was given a light coat of oil. 

(c) Richardson Road was widened and graveled for approximately 
one mile. 

(d) Davis Road was widened and graveled for Y mile. 

(e) Riverneck Road was widened and graveled to a depth of two 
feet for 54 m il e through a swamp. 

( f ) Proctor Road was widened and graveled at various places, 
(g) Middlesex Street was graveled a distance of y 2 mile and the 
old street car rails were removed. 

2. DRAINAGE 

(a) School Street, West Chelmsford was drained for a distance 
of 1200 feet with 12" cement tile. 

(b) Pine Hill Road was provided with drainage at several 
locations. 

(c) Stedman Street at Chelmsford Street intersection was widened 
and a 48" steel culvert pipe placed to carry the brook water into the old 
culvert under Chelmsford Street. 

(d) Middlesex Street was drained a distance of 400 feet. Catch 
basins were built where necessary on all of this work. 

3. PARKS AND PLAYGROUNDS 

(a) The High School Athletic Field was enlarged for baseball 
and football use with 65,000 square feet of area added to its usefulness. 
It was necessary to move 3,000 cubic yards of earth, and replace 1,000 
yards of loam. The new area was graded level and seeded. A car parking 
area was graded at the north side of the field. 

173 



(b) The North Common was graded. 

(c) The Yarney Playground was enlarged so that a regulation 
diamond can be laid out there. This work necessitated the removal of 
11,000 cubic yards of earth which was used to fill low portions of the 
playground property. Two tennis courts were subgraded. 

4. PUBLIC BUILDINGS 

(a) Town Infirmary — Many decayed sections of these buildings were 
removed and rebuilt. A new milk room was constructed, as well as a new 
floor and ceiling in the kitchen, and a dormer window built in the attic. 
The entire outside of the house and several rooms were painted two coats. 

(b) Centre Town Hall — The Town Treasurer's office was en- 
larged. The entire roof was reshingled and the entire building was painted 
two coats inside and outside. 

(c) North Town Hall — New partitions were constructed in the 
American Legion quarters and police office. Partitions in all toilets were 
rebuilt and new plumbing installed. The upper hall walls were panelled. 
The entire inside of the building was given two coats of paint. At the 
present time the entire outside is being painted, and a new vestibule is 
being built. 

(d) Town Garage and Tool Sheds — The old garage was torn down 
and a larger one built. The tool shed was enlarged and an office was built 
for the Superintendent of Highways. All of these buildings were painted 
two coats on the outside. 

(e) Schools — The following schools received new partitions and 
two coats of paint inside : High. McFarlin, New Princeton, Old Princeton, 
Highland Avenue, Quessy, and East Chelmsford. The Westlands School 
grounds were regraded, loamed and seeded. Total area one and eight-tenths 
acres. A tennis court was- constructed on these grounds. 

( f) Fire Houses — The West Chelmsford building was painted 
inside and outside. The roof was reshingled and various inside carpenter 
work was done. The East Chelmsford building roof was repapered. The 
Centre building received repairs to walls and inside paint. 

5. WATER HOLES 

Four water holes for fire protection were constructed at the follow- 
ing locations: Acton Road. South Chelmsford, Alcorn farm on Hunt 
Road, Lupien farm on Westford Road, and at Bilson's Corner, Main 
Street, West Chelmsford. These holes are 12 feet in diameter and 10 to 
12 feet deep giving a water storage of from 8,000 to 10,000 gallons, and 
were constructed of field stone walls 18" to 24" thick with a 4" concrete 
top supported by heavy steel rails. The opening for the engine hose is 
24" square and has a hinged steel cover plate. Suitable approaches were 
built for the convenience of fire engines. 

6. CEMETERIES 

New gates have been erected or will be erected in all of the Town 
owned cemeteries to a total of nine gates : they were made of the best 
grade of wood and are supported by cut granite masonry columns. 

(a) Pine Ridge Cemetery — Seventy-five feet of cut granite masonry 

174 



walls have been constructed on each side of the gate, 600 feet of old drive- 
way has been resurfaced, and 600 feet of new driveway is now under 
construction. The entrance section of the grounds has been cleared of all 
underbrush, the surface has been spaded up and smoothed ready for seeding. 
All trees were properly trimmed. At present four acres of grounds 
along Riverneck Road are being cleared. 

(b) Riverside Cemetery — Two new gateways have been constructed, 
all the old wall along Middlesex Street has been straightened and repointed. 
A new granite masonry wall has been built along Middlesex Street for 
100 feet to close in the property at the east end of the cemetery. This 
section has been cleared of brush and a low portion filled and loamed. A 
new wire fence has been built along the railroad bound. 

(c) Fairview Cemetery — Approximately two acres of grounds 
are being cleared and spaded, the entire frontage of 600 feet is being walled 
in, and three gates erected. 

7. OLD NORTH ROAD GRAMMAR SCHOOL FOUNDATION 

These unsightly walls are being torn down. The front of the lot will 
be cleaned up and a lattice fence built part way back to hide the exist- 
ing hole. 

8. APPLE PEST CONTROL 

Two crews of men are now cutting down pest bearing trees in vari- 
ous parts of the Town. 

9. MOTH EXTERMINATION 

A crew of men are now destroying gypsy moth nests in the infested 
woods along the south and west sections of Town. 

10. GARMENT MAKING 

Twenty-one women are making wearing apparel, bed clothing, etc. 
This project started last July and is expected to continue indefinitely, 
The cloth is supplied by the Federal Government, miscellaneous findings 
such as thread and buttons are purchased from Town funds. 

11. POLICE DRIVE AND PARKING SPACE, 
NORTH TOWN HALL 

Constructed a 10 foot wide drive along north side of property, 
and a police car parking space near police office. Constructed sidewalks 
from police car parking space to police office door. 

12. BANK WALL, TOWN INFIRMARY 

Rebuilt this wall which had partly fallen down (Billerica Street). 

13. PLAYGROUND INSTRUCTION 

Two instructors were supplied out of Government funds to teach 
organized play at Varney Playground. 

175 



14. ORCHESTRA 

An orchestra of 10 pieces was organized and paid for from C. W. A 
Government funds for several months last spring. 

15. SNOW REMOVAL 

After the snow storm of January 23rd all of the men on the E. R. A 
were turned over to the Superintendent of Highways for snow removal. 
The Government authorized the payment of these men out of E. R. A 
funds, saving the Town $1,208.40. 

COST OF PROJECTS 

Amount Paid Out of Federal Funds from November 27, 1933 to February 
15. 1935: 

For Wages $100.: 

For Materials 4./08.39 

Total $104,990.51 

Amount Appropriated by the Town of Chelmsford During 1934 
for Materials. Truck Hire. Etc.. or 9.09fr of Total 
Expenditures $ 10.500 00 

Total Expenditure $115,490.51 

FAMILIES AND PERSONS BENEFITTED 

At the present time. February 1. 1935. there is a total of 154 per- 
sons on the E. R. A. payrolls consisting of 133 men and 21 women. For 
the past year the number has varied from 82 to 200 according to the 
Federal money alloted to Chelmsford each month. 

Since the beginning of the C. W. A. in November. 1933. up to the 
present, 286 families have been benefitted by work relief wages, and the 
total number of persons in these families totals 1671. Forty-two families 
were taken directly from the Town Welfare rolls and put to work on the 
E. R A. The wages earned have been at the average rate of $12.00 a 
week per family, and in addition the larger families have been aided 
through the distribution to them of large quantities of clothing and surplus 
food commodities received from Federal sources. The following food 
products have been received to date, and most of it has been distributed : 
8,500 pounds potatoes. 150 pounds cheese. 1.776 pounds rice. 2.600 pounds 
veal. 1.36S pounds canned roast beef. 576 pounds canned hamburg, 27 bar- 
rels cabbage. 120 pounds butter and 300 pounds sugar. 

FUTURE PROJECTS 

The citizens of South Chelmsford have formed a water district, 
and when they receive their charter and have become incorporated as such. 
a project will be submitted to the E. R. A. project department, and the 
labor will be paid for through E. R. A. funds, and the people within the 
district will pay for all material, trucking, etc 

176 



The Centre water district is contemplating extending their water 
mains up the North Road, and also in roads leading off the North Road, 
and we expect that work will also be done under the E. R. A., and financed 
as above mentioned. The North Chelmsford water district is also planning 
to extend their mains up the Groton Road, Main Street to West Chelms- 
ford, and other roads, and we expect this work also can be done under 
the E. R. A. 

The above projects will lie big undertakings, and being done in the 
above manner will save the Town districts several thousands of dollars 
besides furnishing water and fire protection in the above named sections 
of the Town. 

I wish at this time to publicly thank the Board of Selectmen and all 
other town officers who were called upon many times to do extra work that 
the E. R. A. organization might function smoothly. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FRANK J. LUPIEN, 

Local Administrator E. R. A. 



177 



Warrant for Annual Town Meeting 

March 4th and 11th. 1935 
COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
Middlesex, ss. 

To John Buchanan, Constable of the Town of Chelmsford. 

GREETING : 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid you are herebv 
requested to notify and warn the legal voters of said Chelmsford 
to meet in their several Polling Places, viz. : 

Precinct 1, Town Hall, Chelmsford Centre. 

Precinct 2, Town Hall, North Chelmsford. 

Precinct 3, Fire House, West Chelmsford. 

Precinct 4, School House, East Chelmsford. 

Precinct 5, Liberty- Hall, South Chelmsford. 

Precinct 6, Golden Cove School, Westlands. 
on Monday, the Fourth day of March, 1935, being the first Mon- 
day in said month, at 12 o'clock noon, for the following purposes : 

To bring in their votes for the following officers : 

Moderator for one year. 

One Selectman for three years. 

One Member of the Board of Public Welfare for three years. 

Treasurer and Tax Collector for one year. 

One Assessor for three years. 

Tree Warden for one year. 

One Member of the Board of Health for three years. 

One Park Commissioner for three years. 

One School Committeeman for three years. 

One Cemetery Commissioner for three years. 

Two Trustees for Adams Library for three years. 

One Sinking Fund Commissioner for three years. 

One Constable for one year. 

178 



And to vote on the following- question, namely : 

"Shall the operation of Section one hundred and five B of 
Chapter one hundred and thirty-one of the General 
Laws, requiring for the taking of fur-bearing animals 
the use of traps that kill at once or take such animals 
alive unharmed, be suspendid within this town?" 

All on one ballot. 

The polls will be open from 12 o'clock noon to 8 P. M., and 
to meet in the Town Hall at Chelmsford Centre on the following 
Monday, the Eleventh day of March, at 10 o'clock in the fore- 
noon, 'then and there to act upon the following articles, viz. : 

ARTICLE 1. To hear reports of Town Officers and Committees ; 

or act in relation thereto. 
ARTICLE 2. To raise and appropriate such sums of money as 
may be required to defray charges for the current year ; or act 
in relation thereto. 
ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will authorize the Selectmen to 
act as its agent in any suit or suits which may arise during the 
current year ; also in such other matters as may arise requiring 
in their judgment the action of such agent, and to employ 
counsel therefor ; or act in relation thereto. 
ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow 
money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the 
financial year beginning January 1, 1935, and to issue a note 
or notes therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any 
such note or notes as may be given for a period of less than 
one year in accordance with Section 17, Chapter 44, of the 
General Laws ; or act in relation thereto. 
ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropri- 
ate the sum of $7,000.00, or some other sum, to be used as a 
reserve fund at the discretion of the Finance Committee, as 
provided in General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 6; or act in 
relation thereto. 
ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropri- 
ate the following sums to balance overdrafts : 

The sum of $1,634.61 for the purpose of balancing over- 
draft in Outside Aid and Old Age Assistance account. 
The sum of $22.14 for the purpose of balancing overdraft 
in Soldiers' Relief Account. 

179 



The sum of $30.00 for the purpose of balancing overdraft 
in the Old Westford Road account; or act in relation there- 
to. 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropri- 
ate a sum sufficient to pay the County of Middlesex, as re- 
quired by law, the Town's share of the net cost of the care, 
maintenance, and repair of the Middlesex County Tubercu- 
losis Hospital, as assessed in accordance with the provisions of 
Chapter 1 1 1 of the General Laws and amendments thereof ; 
or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $52.50, or some other sum, with which to 
defray the cost of hospitalization ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropri- 
ate the sum of $750.00, or some other sum, for the purpose of 
purchasing an automobile for use of the Police Department ; 
or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to accept Cart 
Road as laid out by the Selectmen as shown by their report 
and plan duly filed in the office of the Town Clerk ; or act in 
relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $4,000.00, or some other sum, for the pur- 
pose of reconstructing Middlesex Street, a similar sum to be 
contributed by the Commonwealth and Middlesex County re- 
spectively ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $4,000.00, or some other sum, for the pur- 
pose of reconstructing the North Road ; a similar sum to be 
contributed by the Commonwealth and County of Middlesex; 
or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $800.00, or some other sum, for the purpose 
of purchasing a certain parcel of land containing a gravel bank 
thereon, from Clarence Nickles ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $114.00, or some other sum, with which to 
pay the executor of the will of Mary Supple, salary due the 
deceased ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $7,500.00, or some other sum, for the pur- 

180 



pose of purchasing tools, material and equipment to continue 
the Emergency Relief Administration projects, or other fed- 
eral and state projects ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to request the De- 
partment of Public Works of the Commonwealth of Massa- 
chusetts to submit to the Secretary of Agriculture a project 
for the improvement of Billerica Street from the Billerica line 
to Riverneck Road for the construction with funds appropri- 
ated to the Commonwealth under Section 204 of the National 
Industrial Recovery Act, and will agree with the said Depart- 
ment that if such project is approved and constructed by the 
Department and the Secretary of Agriculture, if the Town will 
thereafter,, at its own cost and expense, maintain the project in 
a manner satisfactory to said Department and Secretary of 
Agriculture, or their authorized representatives, and will make 
ample provision each year for such maintenance, and will au- 
thorize the Board of Selectmen to sign such a request and 
agreement in behalf of the Town, or take any other action re- 
lating thereto. 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will grant and convey to the 
County of Middlesex a certain parcel of land owned by the 
Town and used for cemetery purposes. Said parcel of land 
to be conveyed to said county in order that Billerica Road may 
be reconstructed and widened ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $500, or some other sum, for hydrant service 
to be paid to the South Chelmsford Water District, if and 
when said District is duly organized by law and has completed 
the installation of the water system ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 19. To sse if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $8,000.00, or whatever sum. for the purchase 
of a 500-gallon Pumper, together with equipment and 1,000 
feet of hose (2.y 2 ") for the Fire Department; or act in rela- 
tion thereto. 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $552.00, or some other sum, for the purpose 
of defraying the cost of claims made by owners of land ad- 
jacent to the North Road ; or act in relation thereto. 

181 



.ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $3,500.00, or some other sum, for the pur- 
pose hi" purchasing equipment suitable for snow removal; or 
act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $300.00, or some other sum, for the purpose 
of complying with Chapter 320 of the Acts of 1934; or act in 
relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $200.00, or some other sum, for the purpose 
of purchasing new seats to he used in Centre Town Hall; or 
act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $850.00, or some other sum, for the purpose 
of purchasing a power sprayer for the use of the Moth De- 
partment ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $1,500.00, or some other sum, for the pur- 
pose of repairing highways in East Chelmsford ; or act in rela- 
tion thereto. 

ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $75.00, or some other sum, to reimburse W. 
H. Bartlett for the expense of operating a truck from Decem- 
ber 1, 1933, to April 12, 1934, on the moth project under the 
C. W. A and E. R. A. ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $778.00, or some other sum, for the purpose 
of purchasing an automobile truck for the Forest Fire Depart- 
ment ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $300.00, or some other sum, for the purpose 
of defraying the cost of leasing quarters for Post 212, Ameri- 
can Legion, located in the station of the N. Y. N. H. & H. R. 
R. ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $300.00, or some other sum, for the purpose 
of caring for the Varney Playground ; or act in relation there- 
to. 



182 



ADDENDA 

ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will vote to accept Sherman 
Street as laid out by the selectmen as shown by their report 
and plan duly filed in the office of the Town Clerk. The re- 
construction of this street to be accomplished as an E. R. A. 
project or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will vote to accept Albina 
Street as laid out by the selectmen as shown by their report 
and plan duly filed in the office of the Town Qerk. The re- 
construction of this street to be accomplished as an E. R. A. 
project or act in relation thereto. 



ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to make and execute in behalf of the 
Town an agreement with the Boston & Maine Railroad with 
reference to land adjacent to Riverside Cemetery ; or act in 
relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the As- 
sessors to use a certain amount of free cash to be applied in 
computing the 1935 tax rate, with the permission of the State 
Tax Commissioner ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the 
Selectmen to appoint from each precinct of the Town three 
persons to serve as a committee to make plans and recommen- 
dations as to the advisability of creating zoning ordinances, 
and to report at some future Town Meeting ; or act in relation 
thereto. 

ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sufficient sum with which to meet unpaid bills of 
1934; or act in relation thereto. 

AND YOU ARE DIRECTED to serve this Warant, by post- 
ing attested copies thereof at the Post Offices in the Centre of the 
Town, South Chelmsford, North Chelmsford and West Chelms- 
ford, and at the School House, East Chelmsford, and the Golden 
Cove School House, Westlands, seven days at least before the time 
appointed for holding the first meeting aforesaid. 

HEREOF FAIL NOT, and make return of this Warrant, 
with your doings thereon, to the Town Clerk at the time and place 
of holding this meeting aforesaid. 

Given under our hands this twelfth day of February in the 
year of our Lord nineteen hundred and thirty-five. 

JAMES A. GRANT, 
FRANK J. LUPIEN, 
STEWART MacKAY, 

Selectmen of Chelmsford. 



183 



ANNUAL REPORT FINANCE COMMITTEE 
Town of Chelmsford, March 11, 1935 

To the Voters of the Town of Chelmsford: 

The Finance Committee submits herewith its recommendations for the 
year 1935. 

We face during the coming year several unusual expenses. The severe 
snow storm in January cost approximately $8,000. We must make appro- 
priations for the continuance of E. R. A. work. A new fire truck should be 
purchased at a cost of $8,000. To add to these amounts, we must raise in 
this year's tax levy the amounts appropriated at the special town meeting- 
held December 4, 1934, after the tax rate was established. 

We call attention to the following letter from the Commissioner of Cor- 
poration and Taxation, which is of importance to every voter and which 
makes necessary an unusual appropriation under Article 5. 

"January 7, 1935. 
"To the Board of Selectmen. To the Town 

Finance or Appropriation Committee. 

"In 1935 the local tax bills must be in the hands of the taxpayers on or 
before June 14, 1935. One-half of the tax is due on July 1st and the re- 
maining half is due on November first. The Assessors will be required to 
determine the tax rate some time in April in order to allow the necessary 
time for commitment of taxes and to permit the collector to prepare the tax 
bills for transmission to the taxpayers that they may have the bills before 
them on or before June 14, 1935. 

"The early requirement for the payment of the 1935 local tax necessi- 
tates each appropriating body determining with accuracy early in the year 
the amount that will be required in order to pay for the full twelve months' 
period running in 1935 with the calendar year. After the 1935 tax rate is 
set it will be impossible to raise additional revenue, and because of this there 
will be an inability on the part of municipalities to spend money in the ab- 
sence of available funds. In respect to most cities and towns there will be 
no available funds after the 1935 tax rate has been set in April by the As- 
sessors. 

"The thought back of this communication is to encourage full appropri- 
ation activities in the months of January, February, March and April to an 
amount sufficient to provide for the entire calendar year of 1935, which will 
mark the fiscal year of every city and town in Massachusetts. Towns can 
set up a Reserve Fund from which transfers can be made to meet extraor- 
dinary or unforeseen expenses. 

"In order that every community be sufficiently apprised of this new re- 
quirement and to impress upon them the necessity of accurately forecasting 
appropriation needs for the entire twelve months some time during the first 
four months of the year, I am prompted to write this letter and distribute 
copies of it rather freely to all whom T think should be aware of the 1935 
requirements. 

"The practice which has prevailed in some communities to purposely 
make the first appropriation less than is required and then to add subse- 

184 



quently through special meetings must be abandoned, because after the tax 
rate is set there can be no appropriations which can be included in it, and if 
there are no funds available, the city or town is likely to face serious dis- 
comfiture. 

"The responsibility of the financial bodies in the cities and towns in 
1935 is perhaps greater than ever before in the requirement of a very careful 
and complete survey of departmental needs. It is highly desirable that the 
amount to be taken from the taxpayers as shown in the tax bill received by 
them on or before June 14, 1935, represents the total amount needed to pay 
for required activities for the fiscal year ending on December 31, 1935, and 
that no necessary functions will have to be abandoned because of lack of 
money not provided through the tax levy. 

"If I can be of any assistance to you please let me know. 
"Cordially yours, 

(Signed) HENRY F. LONG, 

"Commissioner of Corporations 
and Taxation." 

Our estimate of the tax rate for 1935 is as follows : 

Total amount recommended in Warrant $264,536 00 

Estimated amount required for State and County 

Tax, Interest and Principal Payments, etc 40,000.00 

Carried forward from 1934 9,548.00 

$314,084.00 

Estimated Receipts, based on year 1934 $ 68,000.00 

Free Cash if allowed by Commissioner : 20,000.00 

88,000.00 

Total amount necessary to raise by direct tax- 
ation • $226,084.00 



Valuation, $6,689,000.00. 

Probable Tax Rate, $33.80 per 1000. 
These figures are based on information available at this time which is neces- 
sarily incomplete. The amount raised by taxation in 1934 was $205,274 60. 
If the amount of $20,000 free cash is not allowed to be used, the tax rate 
will be approximately $37.00. 
Article 2. To raise and appropriate such sums of money as may be required 

to defray Town charges for the current year. 

The Finance Committee recommends that the following sums be raised 
and appropriated for the purposes of Article 2 : 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

Moderator's Salary $ 10.00 

Selectmen's Salaries as follows : 

Chairman 252.00 

Members 423.00 

Administration Expense 250.00 

185 



Town Clerk Salary 180.00 

Town Clerk Expense 100.00 

Town Accountant's Salary 1,800.00 

Town Accountant's Expense 200.00 

Collector and Treasurer : 

Salary 2,000.00 

Bond 480.00 

Expense 1,487.00 

Assessors : 

Salaries 2,200.00 

Expense 800.00 

Town Counsel's Salary 280.00 

Finance Committee Expense 20.00 

Registrars' Salaries and Expense 200.00 

Election. Salaries and Expense 300.00 

Public Buildings : 

Janitors' Salaries 855.00 

Fuel, Light and Water 1,250.00 

Other Expense 400.00 



PROTECTION, PERSONS AND PROPERTY 

Police Department $ 8.800.00 

Fire Department: 

Administration 4,300.00 

Maintenance 3,700.00 

Labor and Expense at Fires 600.00 

Hydrant Service : 

Center 500.00 

North 500.00 

East 1,500.00 

West 20.00 

Sealer Weights and Measures 175.00 

Moth Department 1,200.00 

Tree Warden 150.00 

Forest Fire Department 900.00 

Fish and Game Warden 100.00 



HEALTH AND SANITATION 
Board of Health : 

Salaries $ 630.00 

Agent's Salary 315.00 

Aid 1,500.00 

Maintenance 200.00 

Meat Inspector 607.00 

Milk Inspector : 315.00 

Physicians' Salaries 90.00 



186 



$ 13,487.00 



$ 22.445.00 



Care of Dumps 100.00 

Plumbing Inspector 200.00 

Vaccine Treatment 300.00 

$ 42,570.00 

HIGHWAYS 

Highway Supt. Salary $ 1,800.00 

General Highway 12,000.00 

Truck Maintenance 2,300.00 

Road Binder 7,000.00 

Snow Removal 9,000.00 ' 

Chapter 90 Work . 2,500.00 

Street Lighting 11,000.00 

$ 45,600.00 

PUBLIC WELFARE 
Overseers Salaries as follows : 

Chairman $ 113.00 

Members 180.00 

Overseers Maintenance 300.00 

Investigator, Salary 1,300.00 

Old Age Assistance and Outside Poor 28,000.00 

Infirmary : 

Supt.'s Salary 810.00 

Expense 2,300.00 

Repairs 50.00 

Soldiers' Relief 1,000.00 

Military Aid 250.00 

State Aid 200.00 

$ 34,503.00 

SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

Administration $ 3,950.00 

Instruction 67,000.00 

Operation and Maintenance 17,450.00 

Auxiliary Agencies 11,350.00 

New Equipment 250.00 

$100,000.00 

VOCATIONAL SCHOOL 

Tuition— Dog Tax plus $ 1,200.00 

$ 1.200.00 

LIBRARIES 

Adams Library $ 2,000.00 

North Chelmsford Library 1,200.00 

$ 3,200.00 

CEMETERIES 

Commissioners' Salaries $ 105.00 

Forefathers' Cemetery 400.00 

187 



Hart Pond Cemetery 400.00 

Pine Ridge Cemetery 400.00 

Riverside Cemetery 400.00 

West Chelmsford Cemetery 400.00 

Fairview Cemetery 250.00 

$ 2,355.00 

RECREATION AND UNCLASSIFIED 

Parks $ 1,000.00 

Memorial Day : 

Center 150.00 

North 150.00 

Town Clock 30.00 

Public Buildings Insurance 1,000.00 

Bond : Treas. Ins. Sinking Fund 40.00 

Animal Inspector 200.00 

Constables 80.00 

Town Reports 775.00 

$ 3,425.00 

Total Recommended Under Article 2 $230,472.00 

Article 5 : 

In accordance with a letter received from the Commissioner of Corpora- 
tions and Taxation, the Finance Committee recommended an unusually large 
amount to cover contingencies in the various departments. 

Article 6 : 

The Finance Committee recommends the appropriation of $1,634.61 and 
$22.14 to balance overdrafts in the Outside Aid and Old Age Assistance and 
Soldiers' Relief Accounts respectively. 

Article 7: 

The Finance Committee recommends the appropriation of $840.77 for 
the purposes of this Article. 

Article 8 : 

The Finance Committee recommends the sum of $52 50 for the purposes 
of this Article. 

Article 9 : 

The Finance Committee recommends the purchase of a new car for the 
use of the Police Department. 

Articles 11 and 12: 

The Finance Committee recommends that because of unusually heavy 
expenses necessary in other departments that work on Middlesex Street and 
the North Road be postponed for a year. 

Article 13 : 

The Finance Committee recommends the purchase of the gravel bank 
named at a cost not to exceed $800.00 

188 



Article 14 : 

The Finance Committee recommends the appropriation of $114.00 for the 
purposes of this Article. 

Article 15 : 

The Finance Committee recommends the appropriation of $7,500.00 for 
E. R. A. work as provided in this Article. 

Article 16 : 

The Finance Committee recommends that the Selectmen be authorized to 
sign the request and agreement as provided in this Article. 

Article 18 : 

The Finance Committee recommends the appropriation of $500.00 for 
the purposes of this Article, payment to be made after said hydrant service 
is installed and in operation. 

Article 19: 

The Finance Committee recommends the appropriation of $8,000.00 for 
the purchase and equipment of a Fire Truck, and that the present East 
Chelmsford equipment be transferred to the custody of the Forest Fire De- 
partment. 

Article 20 : 

The Finance Committee recommends the appropriation of $552.00 for the 
purposes of this Article. 

Article 21 : 

The Finance Committee recommends the purchase of a truck and snow 
removal equipment at a cost not to exceed $3,500.00. 

Article 22 : 

The Finance Committee recommends the appropriation of $300.00 for 
the purposes of this Article. 

Article 23 : 

The Finance Committee recommends the appropriation of $200.00 for 
the purposes of this Article. 

Article 24 : 

The Finance Committee recommends the purchase of a power sprayer at 
a cost not to exceed $850.00. 

Article 25 : 

The Finance Committee recommends the appropriation of $1,500.00 for 
the purposes of this Article. 

189 



Article 26: 

The Finance Committee are informed that this bill was not contracted 
by the Town and therefore cannot recommend its payment. 

Article 27 : 

In the event of the appropriation of $8,000.00 for the purchase of a new 
fire truck under Article 19, and the transfer of the East Chelmsford truck 
to the Forest Fire Department, this Article will be unnnecessary. If Article 
19 is not favorably acted upon, a new truck is urgently needed for forest 
fire work, and the sum named herein should be appropriated. 

Article 28 : 

The Finance Committee recommends that the sum of $200.00 be appro- 
priated for the purposes of this Article. 

Article 29 : 

The Finance Committee recommends the appropriation of $300.00 for the 
purposes of this Article. 

Article 33: 

The Finance Committee recommends that a sufficient amount be raised 
and appropriated to pay all unpaid bills, and that each department explain 
over-runs of its appropriations at Town Meeting. 

JOHN C. MONAHAN, 
BIRGER PETTERSON, 
GEORGE W. DAY, 
EMILE E. PAIGNON, 
JOHN G PARKER, 
WILLIAM T. PICKEN, 

Finance Committee, 

Town of Chelmsford. 



190 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

AND THE 

Superintendent of Schools 

OF CHELMSFORD, MASS. 

FOR THE SCHOOL YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 

1934 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

JOHN A. McADAMS, Chairman Term Expires 1935 

Westlands 
RALPH A. BERG Term Expires 1930 

Chelmsford 
JAMES P. CASSIDY, Secretary Term Expires 1937 

North Chelmsford 

SUPERINTENDENT 

GEORGE S. WRIGHT, A. B Office in McFarlin School 

Chelmsford 

SCHOOL PHYSICIANS 

ARTHUR G. SCOBORIA, M. D Chelmsford 

FRED E. VARNEY, M. D North Chelmsford 

SCHOOL NURSE 
(MRS.) MAE S. LEWIS, R. N Office in McFarlin School 

ATTENDANCE OFFICERS 

WINSLOW P. GEORGE Westlands 

RALPH G. HULSLANDER North Chelmsford 

SCHOOL CALENDAR 

The school year is divided into a fall term ending at the Christmas 
vacation, and three terms after the holidays. 

Fall term from September 5, 1934 to December 21, 1934. 

Second term from January 2, 1935 to February 15, 1935. 

Third term from February 25, 1935 to April 2, 1935. 

Fourth term from April 22, 1935 to June 21, 1935. 

The school year of 1935-1936 will open on Wednesday, September 4, 1935. 

NO. SCHOOL SIGNAL 

In case of extremely bad storms or of roads dangerous because of ice, 
a signal for no school is given on the fire alarms at the Centre, North, 
West, South, and East, three blasts, repeated three times. When given 
at 7.15 there are no sessions for the day. The signal at 11.15 indicates no 
afternoon session for the grades. 

TEACHERS 

The table shows the teachers at the beginning of the school year 1934-35, 
the position held, the date when service in Chelmsford began, and the institu- 
tions in which they prepared. 



HIGH SCHOOL 

Lucien H. Burns, A. M., Principal, Sept. 1930, University of New Hamp- 
shire, Columbia. 

C. Edith McCarthy, Vice-Principal, Commercial, Sept. 1923, Salem Normal. 

F. Christine Booth, B. A., Latin, Math., Sept. 1927, Colby. 

*Hilda B. Dunigan, B. S. E., Commercial, Sept. 1928, Salem Normal. 

Daisy B. MacBrayne, English, Sept. 1929, Boston University. 

Proctor P. Wilson, B. S., Science, Feb. 1930, M. I. T. 

George R. Knightly, A. B., Social Science, Sept. 1930, Aurora. 

Morris L. Budnick, A. B., Math., Science, Sept. 1930, Tufts. 

Mildred L. Wells, A. B., English, Math., Sept. 1931, Boston University. 

**Dorothy F. Gay, A. B., French, Sept. 1932, Wheaton. 

John J. MacLaughlan, A. B., English, Nov. 1933, Holy Cross. 

Warren C. Dean, A. B., English, Sept. 1934, Boston University. 

Ernestine E. Maynard, B. S. E., Commercial, Sept. 1934, Salem. 

Earl J. Watt, A. M., French, Nov. 1934, Harvard. 
*— Deceased August 11, 1934. 
** — Deceased September 29, 1934. 

McFARLIN 

Louis O. Forrest, Principal, VIII, Sept. 1926, Gorham Normal. 
(Mrs.) Eva L. Dobson, VII, Nov. 1919, Plymouth Normal. 
Louise E. Cummings, VII-VIII, Sept. 1931, Lowell Normal. 
M. Beryl Rafuse, VI, Sept. 1920, Truro Normal. 
Helena B. Lyons, V, Sept. 1920 : , North Adams Normal. 
Emily Hehir, IV, Sept. 1928, Lowell Normal. 
Mayme G. Trefry, III, Sept. 1921, Truro Normal. 
Myrtle Greene, II, Sept. 1928, Lowell Normal. 
Clara W. Dexter, B. S. E., I, Sept. 1934, Lowell. 

EAST 

Harry Y. Hilyard, Principal, VII-VIII, Sept. 1930, Gcrham Normal. 
(Mrs.) Jessie F. Brown, V-VI, April 1930, Boston University. 
Mildred G Perry, III-IV, Sept. 1931, Lowell Normal. 
Gladys G Mooney, 1-11, Sept. 1931, Lowell Normal. 

HIGHLAND AVENUE 

Harry J. Kane, B. S. in Education, Principal, VII-VIII, Sept. 1929, Bridge- 
water Normal. 
Viola Mellen, V-VI, Sept. 1931, Lowell Normal. 
Lottie M. Agnew, III-IV, Sept. 1923, Lowell Normal. 
Gertrude P. Henderson, 1-11, Sept. 1932, Lowell Normal. 

PRINCETON STREET 

Ella A. Hutchinson, Principal, VII, Sept. 1905, Framingham Normal. 
Ebba A. Peterson, B. S. E., VIII, Nov. 1933, Boston University. 



(Mrs.) Elsa Reid, VI, Sept. 1922, Lowell Normal. 

Ann G. Murphy, V, Sept. 1932, Lowell Normal. 

(Mrs.) Lilla B. McPherson, IV, Sept. 1920, Framingham Normal. 

Genevieve E. Jantzen, III, Sept. 1911, Lowell Normal. 

Helen C. Osgood, II, Sept. 1921, Lowell Normal. 

Catherine J. McTeague, I, Sept. 1927, Lowell Normal. 

QUESSY 

V. John Rikkola, Principal, VII-VIII, Sept. 1930, Salem Normal. 
Bertha H. Long, V-VI, April 1896, Salem Normal. 
Josephine M. Quigley, B. S. E., III-IV, Sept. 1934, Lowell. 
Jane E. McEnaney, 1-11, Sept. 1926, Lowell Normal. 

SOUTH 

Mary H. Ryan, IV-VI, Sept. 1930, Lowell Normal. 
Hazel R. Young, 1-111, Sept. 1930, Lowell Normal. 

SOUTH ROW 
Gladys Harrington, I-II-III-IV, Sept. 1931, Lowell Normal. 

WESTLANDS 

H. Jean Rafuse, Principal, VII-VIII, Sept. 1920, Martin's Point, N. S. 

High School. 
Vera G. Rafuse, V-VI, Sept. 1921, Truro Normal. 
(Mrs.) Charlotte K. Duffy, III-IV, Sept. 1932, Lowell Normal. 
(Mrs.) Marion S. Adams, I-II, Jan. 1928, Lowell Normal. 

SUPERVISOR 
Charlotte L. Hyde, Music, Oct. 1927, Lowell Normal. 

TRANSPORTATION 
George W. Marinel, North Chelmsford. 

JANITORS 

High School, C. O. Robbins, Chelmsford Centre. 
McFarlin, Otis Brown, South Chelmsford. 
East, Bernard McLaughlin, East Chelmsford. 
Highland Avenue, Edward Fallon, North Chelmsford. 
Princeton Street, Patrick Cassidy, North Chelmsford. 
Quessy, John Boutillier, West Chelmsford. 
South, George Burton, South Chelmsford. 
South Row, Mrs. Hildur Smith, Chelmsford Centre. 
Westlands, E. Berg, Westlands. 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

To the Citizens of the Town of Chelmsford: 

We herewith submit the report of your School Committee for the 
year 1934. 

It is necessary to reiterate that the number of pupils in the High school 
is larger than the building can accommodate. This condition first devel- 
oped several years ago, and the number of High school pupils has been 
steadily increasing since that time. The High school building, constructed 
in 1916-1917, was designed to accommodate 225 pupils. In 1917, the 
enrollment was 161; in 1922 it was 184; in 1927 it was 224, in 1932 it 
was 376. At the opening of school in September, 1934 the enrollment 
was 407. The number of students is so large that makeshift arrange- 
ments have been necessary in order to find space for more students 
than the building can adequately house. This condition is harmful to the 
students, to their teachers and to the community at large. In such 
cramped quarters the students are deprived of the quiet, roomy environ- 
ment so necessary to concentration and efficient study. The teacher's 
task of drilling book learning into restive young minds, difficult enough 
at best, is made more difficult by hampered surroundings. The com- 
munity ill serves itself under the present conditions, for it is axiomatic 
that the school children of today are the men and women of tomorrow. 
Their training now will have a large effect upon their government then. 
We therefore recommend that an adequate addition be made to the High 
school. 

In our report of 1932 we called to your attention the fact that some 
of the school buildings are not sufficiently insured against loss or dam- 
age by fire. No insurance whatever is carried on the High school or 
the McFarlin school. The town maintains an insurance fund which is now 
approximately $37,600.00 for the purpose of repairing and reconstruct- 
ing town buildings damaged or destroyed by fire. This fund is not large 
enough to pay the cost of reconstructing either the High school or the 
McFarlin school. It is not within the province of this committee to 
place insurance upon these buildings. We recommend that an adequate 
amount of insurance against fire loss be placed upon all school buildings. 

The contract under which George W. Marinel is now transporting 
the school children of Chelmsford expires in June, 1935. During the 
term of this contract, the number of pupils so increased that it was 
necessary for the contractor • to add three new bus trips to the number 
of trips which were being made at the time the contract was executed. 
The contractor received no extra compensation for these additional trips. 
His service has been very good, and we have found him at all times 
willing to cooperate with our department for the good of the schools. 



The work of the Parent-Teacher Associations throughout the town 
has been most helpful to us. We arc grateful for the unselfish efforts 
of the members of these organizations, and we wish them continued suc- 
cess in their work. 

The janitors of the various school buildings have performed their 
duties in a very satisfactory manner. 

We wish to give to the teachers written expression of our apprecia- 
tion of their work. The rank and file of our teachers give a full and 
satisfactory performance of their duties. Always conscious of their high 
moral responsibility they give to their teaching the zealous ardor which 
it demands. We commend them for their spirit of cooperation and 
loyalty, and for the patience, kindness, and sympathetic understanding 
which characterize their work. 

IN MEMORIAM 

Within seven weeks in the fall of 1934, the town of Chelmsford 
lost two of its ablest, most loyal and best loved teachers. Hilda Beatrice 
Dunigan passed away on the 11th day of August, 1934. Dorothy Frances 
Gay was taken from us on September 29, 1934. These two esteemed 
young ladies were the finest examples of American womanhood, and 
an inspiration to everyone who knew them. Extremely capable teachers, 
they worked untiringly for their students, their friends and the organiza- 
tions of which they were members. They were daughters to be proud of. 

On each sad occasion, this committee drew and adopted a memorial. 
It is fitting that these memorials be made a part of this report. 

HILDA B. DUNIGAN— A MEMORIAL 

Hilda B. Dunigan was born in North Chelmsford on the 29th day 
of May, 1906, the daughter of James P. and Rose E. (Smith) Dunigan. 
Her primary and grammar school training was had at the Highland 
Avenue School very near to her father's home. She then attended 
Chelmsford High School where she accumulated many honors particularly 
in the commercial subjects, her chosen line of study. In September, 1924, 
after completing a one year post-graduate course at Chelmsford High 
School, she entered Salem Teacher's College. She studied for four years 
at that college, commuting daily from her home in Chelmsford. For her 
excellence in scholarship she received many honors from Salem Teachers' 
College and was graduated from there in June of 1928 with the degree 
of Bachelor of Science in Education. 

In September 1928 Miss Dunigan was elected a teacher of com- 
mercial subjects in the Cheknsford High School. From the time of 
assuming her duties in our High School, she knew she had the illness 
which finally caused her death, but she went about gallantly, doing her 
work well, holding her head high and happily smiling — so that no one 
would suspect. For six full years she taught commercial subjects in 
Chelmsford High School. Tn the vineyard of young minds committed 
to her charge she worked patiently, gently, and cheerfully, moulding 
happy and successful lives. She encouraged the children to give their 



best and they gave it. Her way was the effective way. It may have been 
because she believed in the children — believed them to be capable; believed 
them to be good— and they fulfilled the faith she had in them. She was 
admired, respected, and loved by all the students in the school. When 
they heard of her untimely death they went, alone and in groups, to pay 
their last respects to their teacher. The capable students, the efficient 
students, the passing students, and too, the blundering ones who in 
youthful energy often trespassed on the rules— she had understood them all ; 
with downcast eyes and heavy hearts they stood beside her coffin and 
silently shed a tear, paying a tribute that no memorial could ever equal. 

In her desire to serve, to benefit, and to inspire the children in our 
school she never tired. Her disposition was contagious. It animated the 
whole school. The passing of her gentle personality will tint the school 
with blue for many a day to come. 

Not our department alone, but the whole town of Chelmsford will 
deeply feel her loss, for she gave generously and graciously of her time 
and talents in all community endeavors. She was an active member of 
many village organizations and worked tirelessly and unselfishly for the 
public good even to the last week of her useful life. She possessed in 
abundance those qualities which mark men and women of excellence and 
worth, in the community. By her industry, honor, frankness, truth, kindli- 
ness, and her spirit of helpfulness she has placed her name upon life's roll 
of honor. 

Her work is done, but it will not be unremembered. Its results 
are dedicated to Time, and Time will see what she could not stay to see — 
the ripening and unfolding of her ideals in the many minds sometime 
within her charge. Thus is she numbered one "of those immortal dead 
who live again in minds made better by their presence." 

In tribute to the memory of Hilda B. Dunigan and in testimony of 
our deep and heartfelt sorrow upon her passing, it is hereby RESOLVED : 

1. That in the death of Hilda B. Dunigan we have lost a learned 
teacher who, inspired by noble ideals, was loyal and devoted to the pub- 
lic good. 

2. That for ourselves and for the people of Chelmsford we extend 
our deepest sympathy to the family of Miss Dunigan, and send to them 
a copy of these proceedings in the hope that our poor words may bring 
them some slight measure of condolence in their loss. 

3. That these proceedings be made a part of the permanent records 
of this committee. 

DOROTHY FRANCES GAY— A MEMORIAL 

Dorothy Frances Gay was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Fred W. Gay 
of Billerica Road, Chelmsford, formerly of Methuen, Mass. It was in 
the latter town that Miss Gay received her early scholastic training, grad- 
uating from Methuen High School in June, 1928. She continued her 
education at Wheaton College, and after a brilliant academic and extra- 
curricular career, received the- degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1932. A 
vacancy occurring in the French department of Chelmsford High School, 



Miss Gay was chosen from a host of applicants as the person best quali- 
fied for the position. She started her work as head of the French depart- 
ment in September, 1932, and continued as the capable head of that 
department until the day of her untimely death. In addition to her 
class work, she assumed control of the French Club, and later of girls' 
basketball. 

It may be truly said of Miss Gay that she won the hearts of all 
with whom she came in contact, not only by the determination with 
which she overcame the many obstacles which beset a new teacher, but also 
by her sense of the true value of things, which gave her insight and 
understanding. Hers was the restless soul that is never satisfied with 
mediocrity, and she constantly strove for greater perfection of both mind 
and body. This was evident in both her teaching, and her private life, 
as she read constantly and well those books that would be of value to her, 
and sought to practice the lore thus gained. Hers was a well balanced 
program entirely in keeping with the intellect that fostered it. 

We feel keenly the loss of Miss Gay, not merely because of her 
proven ability as an instructor, but because of the splendid example she 
was to each and every girl student who came in contact with her as 
teacher, coach, and always as their friend. Their successes were her 
joy, and the proudest moment of her life came when her team won 
the Suburban League championship last year. Mentally alert and physically 
active to the last, she was the type of American girl that every parent 
desires his daughter to become. She lived her short life to the full and 
left nothing undone that could have been completed, an epitaph that few 
can claim. 

We cannot forget Miss Gay in the days to come, for her personality 
is impressed upon our memories indelibly. We shall have with us 
always a picture of that youth, gayety, and ability that will remain 
untarnished by any of the misfortunes which the world too often bestows. 
The children 'of Chelmsford have lost an efficient teacher, an outstand- 
ing example of American womanhood, and most of all a true and dear 
friend, but the memory of her life remains as an inspiration that shall 
continue long after the walls of Chelmsford High School have crumbled 
to dust. It is impossible for us to express ourselves to her family in this, 
their hour of loss, but the poet offers consolation as he says: 

"Death came unheralded ; — but it was well ; 

For so thy Saviour bore 
Kind witness, thou was meet at once to dwell 

On His eternal shore ; All warning spared. 
For none He gives where hearts are for prompt 

change prepared." 

In testimony of our respect for Dorothy Frances Gay and in rever- 
ence to her memory, it is hereby RESOLVED : 

1. That in the untimely passing of this lovely girl, Dorothy Frances 

8 



Gay, we have lost an excellent teacher who was an inspiration to all her 
students. 

2. That for ourselves and for the people of Chelmsford we extend 
our deepest sympathy to the family of Miss Gay, and send to them as a 
token of our sorrow a copy of these proceedings. 

3. That these proceedings be made a part of the permanent records 
of this committee. 

The reports of the Superintendent of Schools,, the Principal of the 
High School and the heads of the various departments are hereto 
appended. We urge you to read carefully these reports as they are 
enlightening from a financial as well as from an educational view- 
point. 

Respectfully submitted. 

JOHN A. McADAMS, 
RALPH A. BERG, 
JAMES P. CASSIDY, 

School Committee. 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT 

To the School Committee : 

This, my seventh report to you and to the people of Chelmsford, the 
Olst in the series, deals particularly with school costs, as did the report of 
1930. The earlier one was written at the beginning of the period of busi- 
ness depression, before towns and cities began cutting school budgets. The 
cost of the Chelmsford schools that year was $103,296.87; the average num- 
ber of pupils was 1,382; making the cost per pupil $74.74.. In 1934 the cost 
was $98,022.61 ; the average membership 1,624 ; making the cost per pupil 
$60.36. The above figures include the cost of the regular day schools only ; 
the cost of the evening school of 1930 and the tuition paid Lowell Vocational 
School are not included. 

The comparisons given be'.ow are based on the report of the Depart- 
ment of Education for the year ending June 30, 1934. Costs in Chelmsford 
are for the town fiscal year ending December 31st. Comparison is made 
with the 83 towns of Group II, towns of over 5000 population ; with a list of 
twenty selected towns, ten larger and ten smaller than Chelmsford; and 
with the entire state. The most valid comparison is doubtless with the 
twenty towns, which are in order of size : Middleborough, Hudson, Stough- 
ton, Whitman, Rockland, Ware, Maynard, Agawam. Grafton. Franklin. 
North Andover. Millbury, Dracut, Shrewsbury, South Hadley. Randolph, 
Westborough, Mansfield, Uxbridge. and Billerica. The population of these 
towns ranges from 5880 to 8608, the valuation (April 1, 1933) from 
$4,018,360 to $9,500,688, and the valuation per pupil from $2,767 to $6,340. 
Chelmsford had a population of 7022, a valuation of $6,683,620, and a valu- 
ation per pupil of $4,284. Certain towns which are near Chelmsford in 
population, such as Concord, Barnstable, and Hingham, are omitted from the 
selected list on account of their much, greater wealth. The costs are figured 
on a unit basis, the cost per pupil in average membership. Obviously the 
greater the number of pupils the greater will be the gross costs. The unit 
basis is the only fair method of comparison. 

ADMINISTRATION. 

The largest item in the overhead cost of running the schools was the 
salary of the superintendent, $3,250. Other costs were : Expenses of School 
Committee, $350; travelling expense to the annual conference of school sup- 
erintendents, $8.00; attendance officers, $30; stationery and postage, $7120; 
telephone, $91.55; making the total for administration $3,800.75. Dividing 
this by the average membership, 1624, the cost of administration per pupil 
was $2.46. For the school year ending June 30, 1934, the cost for the 83 
towns in Group II was $2.90; in the 20 selected towns, $2.88; and in the 
state, $3.30. 

INSTRUCTION. 

Under this heading is found the largest single item in school costs, the 
salaries of teachers. It is the expenditure to which all others are subsid- 
iary. Unless the returns from the investment in salaries are of high 

10 



quanty the school system cannot be a good one. I urge careful considera- 
tion to the comparisons given below, which show the cost of instruction in 
Chelmsford and other towns. 

High School Elementary Schools. Total 

Salaries $18,470.80 $42,677.41 $61,148.21 

Books 705.41 825.79 1,531.20 

Supplies 1,081.33 962 29 2,043.62 

Total $20,257.54 $44,465.49 $64,723.03 

The sum paid teachers is a large one, but so is the number of, children 
cared for. Dividing the amounts in the first column by 374, the average 
membership of the High School, in the second by 1250, and in the third by 
1624, the unit costs for instruction are seen to be; 

High School Elementary Schools All Schools 

Salaries $49.39 $34.14 $37.65 

Books 1.89 .66 .98 

Supplies 2.89 .77 1.26 

Total $54.17 $35.57 $39.85 

When analyzed to show unit costs the wonder is that so much can be 
done for so little. At an average cost of less than $40, a pupil was given 
instruction for 176 days; his books cost less than a dollar; and his supplies, 
such as paper, pencils, notebooks, laboratory equipment, typewriters, maps, 
etc., cost $1.26. It should be said that the expenditure for books in 1934 
would not be adequate to keep these essential aids to good schools in service- 
able condition year after year. The policy is followed of having books 
which cost 75c. or more rebound before they are too badly worn out. From 
$50 to $100 is spent in this way each year, at a cost of 30c. or 35c. a book. 
School books are very strongly bound. Their prices generally did not go 
down during the depression nor have they advanced. School paper went 
down to a pre-war level, and under the code prices are now sharply ad- 
vanced. Six additional typewriters were bought for the High School, and 
their cost, $360, is included in supplies for 1934 The table below compares 
the unit costs in Chelmsford with other towns : 

Chelmsford Group II Twenty Towns The State 

Salaries $37.65 $56.34 $43.56 $63.06 

Books 98 1.37 1.25 1.11 

Supplies 1.26 2.45 2.01 2.29 

Put in another way, the expenditure for salaries for each pupil in school 
in Chelmsford was $5.91 less than in the twenty selected towns, $18.69 less 
than in the towns of Group II, and $25.41 less than in the entire state. To 
make the comparison entirely complete it should be stated that Chelmsford 
is not paying the lowest salaries per pupil in school. Of the twenty selected 
towns there is one which pays less. 

In connection with this discussion of salaries I would call attention to 
the fact that two separate reductions have been made. In the spring of 1931 
the salaries at which teachers begin were reduced by $50 for elementary 

11 



positions and by $100 for High, and the maximum salaries for all positions 
wire reduced by $100 for all teachers who were not already receiving more 
than the new maximum. Only a few teachers were affected at first, but as 
changes have occurred the number has increased till now there are no less 
than 27 out of the 49 teachers who are receiving either $50 or $100 less as a 
result of the downward revision of the salary schedule in 1931. 

A second was made by the teachers themselves when from September, 

1932, to February 1, 1933, they (with two exceptions) returned to the town 
treasury five per cent, of their monthly salaries, and the Superintendent ten 
per cent. At the annual town meeting of 1933 the appropriation for the 
School Department was cut to such an extent that the Committee was forced 
to reduce the salaries of teachers, the nurse, and physicians five per cent , 
the principal of the High School ten per cent., and the Superintendent about 
14J/2 per cent. This reduction is still in force. The teachers have requested 
that this last cut be restored. 

During the last four years many towns and cities have reduced the 
amount of the teachers' payroll by abolishing or suspending positions, by 
enlarging classes so as to avoid engaging new teachers, by accepting contri- 
butions from teachers or requiring teachers to make them, and by actually 
cutting salaries. The contributions, voluntary and otherwise, and the cuts 
range from 5% to 20% of the salaries formerly paid If contributions are 
received the salaries remain the same on paper, and for the purpose of deter- 
mining the amount of pension due a teacher about to retire, but the salary 
actually received is reduced as when a direct cut is applied. Chelmsford has 
economized in all these ways : positions have been abolished, physical direc- 
tor and building assistants ; classes have been enlarged till the rooms literally 
can hold no more pupils ; contributions have been made ; and since February, 

1933, a cut of 5% or more has been applied to salaries. In many towns and 
cities, but not all, cuts have been restored wholly or in part, and other places 
are planning to take such action at an early date. Also, it should be noted 
that the salary schedule was low in Chelmsford before any reductions were 
made. In many places after the cuts of 5, 10, or 15% were applied the 
teachers were still receiving more than the Chelmsford teachers received 
before the last cut was made. Ts not the request that salaries be restored to 
the 1932 basis a reasonable one? 

During 1934 five changes occurred in the teaching corps. Miss Libby 
and Miss Grant resigned because of marriage, and Miss Mary McEnaney to 
accept a postion in Lowell. The community was saddened in August by the 
death of Miss Dunigan, and again in September by the death of Miss Gav. 
Two extremely efficient and very popular teachers were lost to the High 
School by these untimely deaths. 

For the positions in the elementary schools Miss Josephine M. Quiglev 
and Miss Clara Dexter, graduates in 1934 of the four-year course in Lowell 
Teachers' College, were engaged. The history position in the High School 
was filled by transferring Air. MacLaughlan to that department, and Mr. 
Warren C. Dean, a graduate of Boston University, was chosen for the Eng- 
lish position. For the commercial position Miss Ernestine Maynard, a grad- 

12 



uate of Salem Teachers' College, was engaged, and for the French position 
Mr. Earl J. Watt, a graduate of Harvard with two additional years of 
graduate work. All the new teachers are doing excellent work. 

OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE. 

Under this heading is included all the expense of keeping the ten school 
buildings clean, heated, and in repair, of water, power, and lights, of brooms, 
brushes, toilet room supplies, etc. Many towns with as large a school popu- 
lation as Chelmsford house all their pupils in three or four buildings. They 
are able to maintain their school plants at less cost than is possible with ten 
buildings. 

Janitor service cost $8,375— $2,040 for the High School and $6,375 for 
the grades. Supplies amounted to $243.51. The janitors, in addition to 
giving the buildings a thorough cleaning in the summer, varnish seats, desks, 
and woodwork, oil the floors, and do some painting. Supplies for these pur- 
poses cost about $325. The school buildings are kept in good condition gen- 
erally. Visitors frequently comment favorably on their appearance. 

The heating of the buildings was more than usually expensive in 1934. 
Coal was purchased in 1933 at $5.61 for 350 tons of soft coal and $8,30 for 
75 tons of buckwheat for the High School. The bins were filled to capacity 
in the summer of 1933, and the balance due put in during the winter. For- 
merly this quantity had proved sufficient for a season, or nearly so. But be- 
ginning in February, due to the prolonged cold weather, additional soft coal 
had to be purchased for all buildings except the High School, East, and 
South. More than 75 tons were put in, first at a price of $6.61 a ton and 
after March 1st at $7.50, and little was left in June. When bids were asked 
in the spring of 1934 the operation of the N. R. A. code resulted in identical 
prices being quoted, $7.50 for soft coal and $10.00 for buckwheat, to apply 
only to the amount delivered immediately. Because of the 75 tons already 
bought and used the appropriation would not permit filling the bins to 
capacity. More coal will be required in some buildings soon, and will cost 
the prevailing code price. 

Lighting the buildings cost $659.68— $162.21 for the High School and 
$497.47 for the elementary. Making allowance for the basement in the 
McFarlin School, used considerably in the evening throughout the year, the 
cost of lighting is about $12.00 a class room, and is very uniform in the dif- 
ferent buildings. Electric current is used for ventilating toilets, and for 
pumps in the buildings not otherwise provided with water. The High School 
power bill was $447.04, and the McFarlin $92.28. The heating and ventilat- 
ing systems in these buildings are dependent on electric power. 

Water cost a total of $476.81— $72.90 for the High School and $403.91 
for elementary. Here there is a wide variation in the costs in the different 
.buildings. Highland Ave. is lowest, $13.05. No lunches are served in this 
building, no children are in the building at the noon hour, and the building 
is not used in the evening. Bottled water was used at South Row at a cost 
of $25.20 for 15 pupils, and at East Chelmsford until about December 1st, 
when water was turned on from the new system at a cost of $221 20 for 
165 pupils. 

13 



Insurance of a limited nature is carried on eleven boilers at an expense 
of $291.12 for a three-year policy. The boilers are inspected twice each 
year under the terms of the policy. Inspection by the state, which would be 
compulsory otherwise, would cost about the same without the insurance 
feature. 

Advantage was taken of E. R. A. labor during the first half of the year 
in projects on the High School athletic field, and in the East Chelmsford, 
Highland Ave., Quessy, and Princeton St. schools. The first project under- 
taken was in the High School and was very nearly completed in 1933. All 
material used, such as lumber, paint, cement, etc., and team hire has been a 
charge against the appropriation for repairs. These projects developed from 
month to month during the year, so no estimate could be made a year ago of 
the sums needed. Indoor work was brought to an end about July 1st. The 
total amount paid for material was $902.71, and for team hire $116. For 
this expenditure the town has received these benefits - . In the High School 
wall-board ceilings were put on the two' rooms in the basement which are 
used for classrooms, making them much lighter and deadening the sound 
from the rooms above. At East Chelmsford plaster walls and woodwork 
were repaired as needed, and the four classrooms, halls, and toilets given 
two coats of oil paint. The same was done at Highland Ave. At Quessy, 
in addition to the same work in the four classrooms and halls, the partitions 
of the boiler room were covered with wallboard to reduce the fire hazard in 
the building. 

At the New Building, Princeton St., the special appropriation of $1700 
for new toilets was supplemented by E. R. A. labor so far as possible. The 
plumbing contract for moving the toilets, including some new fixtures, was 
$1,225.88. In addition, partitions had to be put in, floors laid, and the center 
of the basement filled in and fitted for use. Magnesite floors cost $132 
The toilets in this building were disgraceful before the change was made ; 
the new ones are light, sanitary, and conveniently located. By using 
E. R. A. labor so far as possible the cost, including contracts, new fixtures, 
and all material was kept nearly to the amount of the special appropriation. 
The total cost, including including improvements made in the basement, was 
about $1,800. 

The E. R. A. work on the athletic field has given Chelmsford, for both 
school and community use, an exceptionally fine field. A backstop is needed 
in order to protect the pupils in the McFarlin School from fouls and foul 
tips, and a grandstand with dressing rooms, showers, and toilets underneath 
would be a valuable addition. 

One major job of repairing was undertaken. The roof of the His?h 
School had been leaking in heavy rains, and minor repairs had been made 
from time to time. Also, a driving rain had beaten in over the front door. 
When the worn-out covering was removed the condition of the roof was 
found to be much worse than was expected. Some timbers had to be re- 
placed, the chimney relaid, and the stone coping on the parapet in the front 
of the building taken down in order to make repairs underneath. Except for 
very minor repairs this ronf had not been touched for the eighteen years 

14 



since the building was erected. The job was thoroughly done at a cost of 
nearly $400, and we belive it will stand for another equal period before need- 
ing attention. 

The below-zero cold waves of last winter caused freeze-ups in all 
schools except the High School and Westlands. In some buildings the 
damage was little, but in others plumbing bills ran to considerable sums. 
Quite generally in the buildings water has to be drawn out of pipes above 
the basement when the temperature goes to zero, and the janitors have been 
successful in avoiding trouble; but the very unusual low temperatures of 
last winter caught boiler return pipes that had been sale before. 'Measures 
have been taken to prevent such trouble in the future. 

The total cost of operating and maintaining the school plant was 
$17,240.45, of which $4,555.90 was for the High School, and $12,684.55 for 
the elementary. Since this was foreseen to be exceeding the appropriation 
by about $9.00, the School Committee, at the special meeting of Dec. 7th, 
asked the town to transfer $775 from Instruction and $125 from New 
Equipment to Operation and Maintenance. The first amount was trans- 
ferred, but owing to a clerical error in the writing of the warrant action 
could not be taken on the second request. . The Finance Committee, how- 
ever, made this amount available. A balance was left in the account Instruc- 
tion due to three things : Several new teachers had been taken on at mini- 
mum salaries in place of teachers who were receiving the maximum; one 
place had been discontinued, building assistant in the McFarlin School ; the 
budget provided for an additional teacher in the High School from Septem- 
ber on, but such a teacher was not engaged. Dividing the total cost of 
operating by 1624, the cost per pupil was $10.62. In group II it was $12.26, 
in the twenty towns $10.64, and in the state $12.71. 

AUXILIARY AGENCIES. 

Under this heading is included the cost of transportatoin, and the salar- 
ies and supplies of physicians and nurse. The law requires the appointment 
of one or more school physicians and one or more nurses. The physicians 
were paid $570 and the nurse $1,567.68. The nurse's supplies cost $117.30. 
The same persons are physicians and nurse for the Board of Health. There 
is considerable misapprehension of the duties of a school doctor and a school 
nurse. So far as they are working under the authority of the School De- 
partment their work is to examine pupils and to report their findings with 
recommendations. They do not treat nor prescribe. These latter functions 
are within the province of the family physician. Acting under the authority 
of the Board of Health they may treat in certain cases, hold clinics, etc. 
It would be within the terms of the law to engage a dentist to make an 
inspection of teeth and to report his findings with recommendations, but he 
could not under authority of the School Department do any dental work. 
The dental work now being done by the so-called "school dentist" is wholly 
within the jurisdiction of the Board of Health, or its agent, who is also 
school nurse. This work by the dentist is entirely optional with parents, 
both as regards inspection and treatment. It is made possible to have a 
child's teeth looked after at school at a reduced rate. "Dental Honor Rolls" 
hang in the classrooms, furnished by the Department of Public Health The 

IS 



teacher records a child's name thereon when a dentist, family or the one 
working in school, gives a certificate that the teeth are in good condition. 
Great credit is due the P. T. A.'s and other organizations and individual citi- 
zens who have furnished funds for assistance in dental work. 

For the last three years transportation has cost $8,150 a year, of which 
we estimate $4,150 is for the High School and $4,000 for the elementary. 
This is the last year of the present contract. Since it was signed two years 
ago last fall a second bus has been put on for East Chelmsford, a second 
bus in the morning for South Chelmsford going by way of Carlisle and 
Proctor roads, and the bus going over Billerica Road returns by Mill Road 
and the Turnpike. Last year's report gave the roads on which pupils were 
picked up for the various schools, then 592 in number. On October 1, 1934, 
the number carried had increased to 618. A change in the school law re- 
quires that bus stops be not over one mile from the homes of pupils. This 
made necessary some changes in the South part of the town, and there will 
doubtless be some slight changes made when a new contract is drawn. 

Criticism of the existing system deals with (a) overloading, (b) pupils 
losing the bus or having to wait too long for it, (c) pupils being brought to 
the buildings too early in the morning or left too late after school before 
being carried home. I would suggest that these principles should apply when 
the busses are running under normal conditions: (a) The proper load for a 
bus should be determined by the Motor Vehicle Department, which now 
makes regulations for equipment, requires periodic inspection of busses, etc. 
Overcrowding is frequently due to the desire of students to take the first bus 
when there are two running fifteen minutes or a half-hour apart; the first 
one being badly overloaded and the second only half full. The drivers and 
teachers should handle this, and the Motor Vehicle Department determine 
whether the busses provided are adequate under normal conditions, (b) The 
responsibility of having pupils at the scheduled bus stops on time lies wholly 
with parents. In good weather the bussess run quite close to schedule, and 
the schedules are such that each stop must be just as brief as possible. We 
do not intend to have any bus run ahead of scheduled time, but in case of 
bad roads they are frequently late. Pupils must be at the bus stops when 
the bus arrives, just as they would be for an electric car or a train. When 
they are at the bus stops on time they do not lose the bus. But they do miss 
busses by loitering along the road when it is approaching the stop without 
making any reasonable effort to get to the stopping place, by being in houses' 
or stores, as well as by being really late, (c) Enough busses should be used 
in the afternoon so that all children can leave for their homes within a half- 
hour of closing time. It is unfortunate that elementary pupils are brought 
to some of the schools so early in the morning, but it seems to be unavoid- 
able with the present system under which High School students and grade 
pupils ride together. 

It is impossible to make a valid comparison of transportation costs with 
any group of towns, since local conditions vary widely. The amount paid 
for transportaton is published, but no figures are given for the number of 
pupils carried, distance, etc. Billerica spent $19,646; Westford, $9,184.18; 
Dracut, $3,292.20; North Andover, $4,093.70; Andover, $11,653.62; Maynard, 

16 



$989.50; Bedford, $3,100. The area of the town and the location of the 
school buildings determine whether much transportation is needed, or little. 

The above analysis shows in detail how school costs in Chelmsford com- 
pare with those of other towns. The report of the Department of Education 
gives in column 46 the cost of all day schools for each town and city for the 
year ending December 31, 1933, and in column 47A the cost per pupil in 
average membership. As has been the case for several years, Chelmsford is 
near the bottom of the list of 355 towns and cities with a cost per pupil of 
$59.81. Only nine towns show a lower cost. 

ENROLLMENT 
A table attached to this report shows the enrollment in the various build- 
ings on October 1st, and the enrollment in the elementary schools and the 
High School for the last ten years. The High School has gone over the 400 
mark for the first time, and since the 8th grade is larger than ever before, it 
is probable that there will be an increase again next year. The enrollment 
in the lower grades has fallen off slightly. In this connection I wish to call 
attention to the work of the Special Committee on School House Conditions, 
which published its report in 1930. This committee made a rather exhaus- 
tive study of the situation, and their recommendations are as valid today as 
when they were first made. I urge that all voters get out their 1930 Town 
Reports and study these recommendations. An addition to the High School 
building is needed much more now than it was four years ago, and without 
such an addition the work of the school is bound to deteriorate. High 
schools are larger everywhere, and in the opinion of most observers they are 
going to be permanently larger. There is little probability that industry will 
again absorb as workers boys and girls from 14 to 16, and it is doubtful 
whether many will be taken at 17 or 18. Until full-grown men and women 
all have jobs public opinion will certainly not give approval to the employ- 
ment of youth of high school age. I urge that the citizens of Chelmsford face 
this solution squarely and make adequate provision for a larger school building. 
Th report of the Principal of the High School, which is endorsed as a 
part of this report, indicates what leading educators are recommending for 
new courses in high schools to meet the new conditions. In order to intro- 
duce such work in Chelmsford more classrooms must be provided and more 
teachers. For three years our problem has been to find a seat for all the 
pupils who entered and to find means of combining them in large classes so 
as to avoid engaging additional teachers. Is it not time to change this policy 
of conserving dollars into one which will regard the welfare of the students 
in the school as the first consideration? And the welfare of students means 
that they must be treated as individuals. Some of them are scholarly and 
interested in books ; others do not learn readily and are more interested in 
doing things than in study ; some of them are eager to keep on in school, 
• others are in school because the law or parental will demands attendance ; 
some are artistic, some musical, some have dramatic ability, some are more 
interested in athletics than in anything else, and some need physical training, 
or health training, more than any other one thing. When nearly all youth 
of the adolescent period are gathered into one school all types are there 
represented. A generation ago only the scholarly found their way through 

17 



the doors of the high schools, and such courses are we now have, unchanged 
since the present building was opened, met the needs of the community. This 
is no longer the case. Our high school cannot adequately serve the citizens 
of Chelmsford until its courses cover a much wider field. The building 
should be enlarged in order that a modern curriculum can be established. 

With the study made by the former committee and its report it would 
seem that the next step would be for the town to authorize the securing of 
plans for an addition to the High School building. This is a matter of far 
greater importance to the future well being of Chelmsford, I believe, than 
any other that can be brought before the town at this time. 

It may be noted that two payments of $3,250 each, with interest, to be 
made on April 1 of 1935 and 1936, complete the payments for the present 
High, School building. Final payments on the McFarlin building will be 
made in 1940. 

Attached to this report are those of the School Nurse and of the Music 
Supervisor. As Mrs. Lewis's report clearly indicates, a considerable part of 
her work is along the lines of public health, but nearly all of it is either with 
school children or in the families from which they come to school. Whether 
she is working strictly as a school nurse, or as agent for the Board of 
Health, the aim of her work is the same, to better the health of the com- 
munity by building stronger bodies in its boys and girls and by improving 
home conditions. 

The Commissioner of Education names reading as the subject of first 
importance in the schools, and music second. Without question there is in- 
creased interest in music among our people, possibly due to radio programs. 
The success of the Drum and Bugle Corps sponsored in the Center by 
American Legion Post No. 212, has made other sections of the town eager to 
give support to plans for teaching instrumental music in the schools. This is 
possible without expense to the town, those receiving the training paying for 
the instruction. 

Many citizens and organizations aided in making 1934 a pleasant and 
profitable year for the schools. The Parent-Teacher associations gave ma- 
terial assistance in dental work, in supporting school lunches, in getting play- 
ground equipment, etc., as well as by aiding teachers through having a better 
understanding of schoolroom situations. The leaders of the Scouts and of 
4-H Clubs are building character in those groups. The American Legion 
has demonstrated that group instruction in instrumental music, under good 
guidance, can produce noteworthy results. The Police Department has pro- 
tected the worst crossings at noon and night, has furthered safety instruction 
in school, and through the Junior Traffic Patrols is getting many children 
home from school more safely than was formerly the case. The Lions Club 
has supported athletics in the High School. The work of the cadet teachers 
from Lowell Teachers' College is an aid in some buildings. Students in the 
commercial classes aid in clerical work. To all these organizations and in- 
dividuals, and to citizens who have contributed helpful criticisms, and espe- 
cially to you for your advice and support, I tender sincere thanks. 
Respectfully submitted, 

GEORGE S. WRIGHT, 

Superintendent. 

18 



REPORT OF HIGH SCHOOL PRINCIPAL 

Mr. George S. Wright, 
Superintendent of Schools, 
Chelmsford, Massachusetts. 

My Dear Mr. Wright: 

I herewith submit my fifth annual report as principal of the Chelms- 
ford High School. My aims in this report are to acquaint the parents 
and tax payers with the conditions existing in the High School and to 
point out the trend of the times in secondary education. 

On December 21, 1934, there were 125 freshmen, 110 sophomores, 76 
juniors, 78 seniors, and 2 post-graduates. Besides this number, 26 had left 
school, making a grand total of 417 pupils who had been enrolled this 
school year. This is 22 more than one year ago and 107 more than four 
years ago. Four years ago there were eleven full-time and two part- 
time teachers. This year there are twelve full-time teachers and one 
part-time teacher. The teachers have from 126 to 194 pupils in class 
work each day with an average of over 155 pupils per teacher each day. 
The maximum load per teacher is considered by many educational experts 
to be 125 pupils per day. 

The three largest class rooms in the building were designed for not 
more than 35 pupils. The other eight class rooms were designed for 25 
pupils. There are 11 classes with 40 to 46 pupils, 17 classes with 30 to 
39 pupils, 22 classes with 20 to 29 pupils, 6 classes with 16 to 19 pupils 
and 3 classes with 10 to 15 pupils. Extra chairs have been crowded into 
all the class rooms to accommodate these large classes. The study hall 
is not large enough to accommodate all of the pupils during their study 
periods. The pupils who cannot study in the study hall have to study 
in class rooms where recitations are going on. 

The following quotations are taken from a report given by a com- 
mittee on curriculum revision at the annual meeting of High School 
Principals held recently in Boston. 

"Curriculum enrichment seems to be the major problem facing the 
rural schools throughout the nation. Many splendid efforts along those 
lines are being made in some of the small communities of our own state, 
but the committee is of the opinion that, for the most part, school execu- 
tives have been too conservative in the revision of their curriculums to 
meet the demands of a new day. Doubtless, there was a time when the 
small high schools of Massachusetts had as their main objective, prepara- 
tion for college, but today Massachusetts statistics show less than 15% 
of their graduates entering college. The committee Delieves that our small 
high schools can do more than at present to prepare their graduates for 
happy, useful living in the small communities where an increasingly large 
proportion of them are bound to reside." 

"In view of the fact that some fifteen percent of the graduates of 
small high schools enter college, it seems that undue prominence is 
given in the curriculum to those subjects that are strictly college prepara- 
tory in nature. Certainly no other reason could justify the prominence 
of four years of Latin, three years of French and from three to four 

19 



years of mathematics in the small high school curriculum. The old 
theory that the mental faculties are strengthened by vigorous application 
to abstract mathematics, Latin and foreign languages, has long since 
been disproved by James, Thorndike, Dewey and others, and at the same 
time experiments have shown that such practical subjects as home economics 
have higher transfer values than any of the traditional subjects. If 
we allotted less time to some of those, we would have room for the intro- 
duction of such courses as would enable us to approach more closely 
the fundamental aims of education." 

"Health comes first in the accepted objectives of secondary education." 
We need a physical education director for our schools. 

"In this period of national distress, we must prepare our students for 
more effective citizenship by acquainting them with the great social, 
economic, and political problems confronting this nation today." 

"No one can doubt that training for worthy home membership is a 
major responsibility of the secondary school. Neverthless, we are not 
putting courses in home training into the curriculum." 

"Vocational preparation we accept as a worthy aim of our schools, 
yet, in spite of the fact that most small schools are located in rural com- 
munities where many of the boys are likely to find part or full time 
employment on the farms after leaving school, we fail to provide sufficient 
courses in agriculture and mechanical arts, subjects which should have 
great practical value for them." 

In this report there is a proposed program of study in which the 
following advantages are pointed out. 

"A course in social science is required each year." This we are 
offering but not requiring. 

"A health activity program has a definite place in the daily schedule." 

"Ample time is given for clubs and assemblies, music and drawing." 
Drawing should be taught in our high school. 

"Courses in home economics are so placed in the daily program that 
every girl may elect one or more of them." 

"Courses in agriculture and mechanical arts are offered as free elec- 
tives to the boys." 

Education has been defined by Avent as follows : "Any change ior the 
better, physical, intellectual, moral, vocational, avocational, civic, religious, 
etc., constitute education regardless of the cause of such change. The 
state establishes a school system and engages in the task of education 
because it recognizes that the young members of society need to be 
changed for the better." 

In a short time it will be physically impossible to crowd all the pupils 
into our present building. When our present plant is enlarged, adequate 
room should be provided and equipment installed whereby the greatest 
number of children can receive that type of education that will change 
them for the better to the greatest degree. 

Th following is a report of Miss C. Edith McCarthy, vice-principal, 
who has charge of the school funds. 

20 



CHELMSFORD HIGH SCHOOL FUNDS 

1. GENERAL FUND 

Balance Jan. 1, 1934 $ 390.02 

Receipts, Jan. 1-Dec. 31, 1934 303.91 

$ 693.93 
Less: Payments, Jan. 1-Dec. 31, 1934 227.00 

Balance Dec. 31, 1934 $ 466.93 

2. ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

Balance, Jan. 1, 1934 $ 456.87 

Receipts, Jan. 1-Dec. 31, 1934 1,260.72 

$ 1,717.59 
Less : Payments, Jan. 1-Dec. 31, 1934 1,562.28 

Balance, Dec. 31, 1934 $ 155.31 

3. BLUE MOON 

Balance, Jan. 1, 1934 $ 186.87 

Receipts, Jan. 1-Dec. 31, 1934 86.00 

$ 272.87 
Less : Payments, Jan. 1-Dec. 31, 1934 88.04 

Balance, Dec. 31, 1934 $ 184.83 

4. HEALTH CLUB 

Balance, Jan. 1, 1934 $ 3.20 

Receipts, Jan. 1-Dec. 31, 1934 19.28 

$ 22.48 
Less : Payments, Jan. 1-Dec. 31, 1934 19.96 

Balance, Dec. 31, 1934 $ 2.52 

5. MAGAZINE FUND (Gift of the Class of 1934) 

Receipts, June 30, 1934 $ 75.00 

Less: Payments, June 30-Dec. 31, 1934 3.00 

Balance, Dec. 31, 1934 $ 72.00 

6. CHEMISTRY CLUB 

Balance, Jan. 1, 1935 _ $ 3.20 

Receipts, Jan. 1-Dev. 31, 1934 12.45 

$ 15.65 
Less: Payments, Jan. 1-Dec. 31, 1934 7.00 

Balance, Dec. 31, 1934 :. $ 8.65 

21 



7. CLASS OF 1935 

Balance, Jan 1, 1934 $ 4.83 

Receipts, Jan. 1-Dec. 31, 1934 398.76 

$ 403.59 
Less: Payments, Jan. 1-Dec. 31, 1934 380.98 

Balance, Dec. 31, 1934 , $ 22.61 

8. CLASS OF 1937 

Receipts, Jan. 1-Dec. 31, 1934 $ 12.68 

Less: Payments, Jan. 1-Dec. 31, 1934 8.20 

Balance, Dec. 31, 1934 $ 4.48 

9. CLASS OF 1938 

Receipts, Sept. 1-Dec. 31, 1934 $ 2.50 

Balance, Dec. .31, 1934 $ 2.50 

10. LATIN CLUB 

Receipts, Jan. 1-Dec. 31, 1934 $ 10.00 

Less: Payments, Jan. 1-Dec. 31, 1934 9.15 

Balance, Dec. 31, 1934 .85 

11. MUSIC FUND 

Balance, Jan. 1, 1934 $ 10.09 

Less: Payments, Jan. 1-Dec. 31, 
1934 21.45 

Deficit, Dec. 31, 1934 $ 11.36 

12. CLASS OF 1936 

Balance, Jan. 1, 1934 $ 12.89 

Receipts, Jan. 1-Dec. 31, 1934 .... 215.00 

227.89 
Less: Payments, Jan. 1-Dec. 31, 
1934 230.90 

Deficit, Dec. 31, 1934 3.01 

$ 14.37 

Total in All Funds $ 906.31 

In Checking Account — Union Old Lowell Na- 
tional Bank $ 246.17 

Less: Outstanding Check No. 785 6.00 

$ 240.17 
On Interest at the Lowell Institution for Savings.... 666.14 

Total in Both Banks $ 906.31 

22 



Each member of the faculty of our high school welcomes any construc- 
tive criticism from citizens of Chelmsford. We are trying to make the 
school a place where every one can find joy in work well done. There is a 
fine Chelmsford Spirit at Chelmsford High School. Pupils and faculty, 
with the assistance of local organizations and loyal citizens of the town, 
are working together to make the better best. 

I am pleased to have this opportunity to publicly express my thanks to 
you, Mr. Wright, the School Committee, the faculty, pupils, janitors, par- 
ents and citizens for the kind assistance and hearty co-operation I have re- 
ceived from you in trying to make our school what it should be. 

Respectfully submitted, 

LUCIAN H. BURNS. 



REPORT OF MUSIC SUPERVISOR 

January 3, 1935. 
Mr. George Wright, 
Superintendent of Schools, 
Chelmsford, Massachusetts. 
Dear Sir: 

Each year that I work in Chelmsford I find the work grows more 
interesting because Chelmsford has such wonderful boys and girls, and 
it is a decided pleasure to work with them. 

The little people in the first and second grades learn to sing simple 
songs with a light head tone. The rhythm of each song is felt, and the 
child is led to express that rhythmic feeling in some way. The children 
learn to march, skip," run, and gallop, whenever the music of the piano 
or victrola tells them to do so. They also bounce balls to music, some 
keeping perfect rhythm, and this is a great aid to develop a keen sense 
of rhythm. I often wish that each school could have a room tucked away 
somewhere, where we would not disturb the rest of the school. If we 
had more room, we could learn so many simple folk dances and games, 
but it is impossible under ordinary conditions. 

Rhythm is carried on into the third grade, then gradually developed 
so that the children can count the number of beats in a measure, find 
the phrases in every piece, and feel the moods that are expressed in music. 
Now in the upper grades we are studying themes in music, simple form, 
and later will make a brief study of some of the prominent composers, 
and their works, most commonly heard today. 

In the third grade, children start their book reading, and it is continued 
on through the grades, with increasing difficulty, when the classes are 
ready to grasp it. 

Two schools this past year presented operettas with most gratifying re- 
sults. The children love them, and look forward to them each year, and 
the proceeds go to enable the Parent Teacher Associations to carry on 
their worthy work. 

In the High School, classes meet twice a week for chorus singing 

23 



and music appreciation. A girls' glee club has been formed, but we find 
it difficult to have full rehearsals, because of so many outside activities, 
and it is impossible to have rehearsals during school hours. We also have 
a good orchestra that meets once a week for rehearsal. 

I wish to thank every teacher for his or her splendid cooperation. 
They are most helpful in every way, and it is a pleasure to work with 
them. 

Thanking you, I am 

Yours truly, 

CHARLOTTE L. HYDE. 



REPORT OF SCHOOL NURSE 

Mr. George S. Wright, 
Superintendent of Schools, 
Chelmsford, Massachusetts. 
Dear Sir: 

I hereby submit my report as school nurse for the year ending De- 
cember, 1934. 

Number of pupils examined 1650 

Defects found : 

Defective teeth 220 

Defective tonsils and adenoids 172 

Defective heart 20 

Defective eyes = 33 

Defective ears 6 

Cervical glands 29 

Thyroid glands 6 

Acne 38 

Anemia 10 

Posture 10 

Bronchitis 1 

Nasal obstructions 18 

Spinal curvature (Scoliosis) 1 

Underweight 32 

Pediculosis 34 

Taken home by nurse for illness 129 

Excluded from school for suspected illness 342 

Absentees visited in home 483 

Excluded from school for ringworm, impetigo, poison ivy, 

pediculosis 188 

Individual instruction 602 

First aid 38 

Dressings 806 

Investigations 37 

Instructive and advisory home visits 176 

24 



Sanitary visits 104 

Personal hygiene and health talks to pupils 147 

Pupils sent or taken to family physician 81 

Pupils sent or taken to school physician 116 

All pupils were given a thorough physical examination by the school 
physicians. Dr. Varney and Dr. Scoboria, assisted by the nurse, while 
the candidates for the football squad received a complete physical 
examination. 

In the grammar schools, the children have been weighed, measured, 
and have had the eye and ear tests, notices of defects being sent to 
the parents. 

CORRECTIONS 

Tonsils and adenoids 63 

Glasses 23 

Lenses changed 35 

Teeth treated 210 

Teeth filled — permanent 614 

Teeth filled — temporary 480 

Teeth cleaned 604 

Extractions — permanent 41 

Extractions — temporary 308 

Examined by dentist 1011 

In our school dentist, Dr. Ritter, we have found an expert who has 
rendered our children a great service by his skillful practice of laying the 
foundation for strong and healthy teeth. Dr. Ritter has been doing dental 
work in our schools every Wednesday from 9 A. M. to 3 P. M. for five 
and one-half years. 

Through the generous funds provided by the Parent-Teacher Asso- 
ciations in all parts of the town, many children who were unable to pay 
had dental work done free of charge. The Westlands Parent-Teacher 
Association, seeing the necessity of a dental chair, purchased one this fall, 
making a total of three chairs in the schools. 

The Parent-Teacher Association sponsors the lunch room in the 
McFarlin school — luncheon consists of hot dinners, soup, sandwiches, cocoa 
and milk. Free lunches amounting to $102 have been served. The lunch 
room in North Chelmsford, directed by the Parent-Teacher Association 
there, serves much the same menu as does the McFarlin school lunch room. 
All the other schools serve hot soup and cocoa, with the exception of 
the Westlands School and Highland Avenue School, where the children 
are able to go home for dinner. 

The great amount of milk consumed daily in the schools, at recess 
mostly, is supplied by Mr. Blood, Mr. Blaisdell, and Mr. Catherwood, 
all reliable and well-known mik dealers. Free milk is given to those 
children who are underweight and unable to buy it. 

May day is now as always a day of inspiration ; we carried out a 
widespread program of health examinations and corrections of defects — 
with emphasis on the preschool child. Many preschool children have bene- 
fitted by the correction of their physical defects, who but for the activities 

25 



stimulated by May Health Day, might have gone through life with some 
impairment of physical fitness. In all the schools the health programs, 
carried out under the direction of the teachers, presented more interest 
than ever in the rapidly-growing campaign for healthy boys and girls. 

Regular sanitary inspections of school buildings reveal them, with 
few exceptions, to be in a sanitary condition. 

When contagious diseases are reported in the schools, the school 
physician and the nurse examine those who have been in contact with the 
diseased child ; then, any books, the child may have are taken by the nurse, 
fumigated, and returned to the places where they belong. Pupils having 
colds have been excluded for the purpose of protecting children with whom 
they have come in contact. 

At Thanksgiving time, the Girl Scouts gave three baskets and the 
police two baskets, which I delivered to needy families. At Christmas 
the Police Department distributed 14 baskets, the Lions Club five baskets, 
and private families gave two baskets. Not only during the holiday season, 
but throughout the entire year, the Police Department furnishes coal, oil, 
clothes, shoes, groceries, and whatever necessary for the comfort of the 
less fortunate ; they also make possible graduation for children who cannot 
afford clothes with which to graduate. 

The aim of the Senior Health Club is : To instruct youth so that 
they may conserve their own health; to establish in them the habits and 
principles of living, which, in later years, will assure that abundant vigor 
and vitality which provide the basis for the greatest possible happiness 
and service in personal, family, and community life ; to influence an effec- 
tive agency for the promotion of social aspects of health education in 
the home and community, as well as the school itself ; to insure a 
better second generation, a still better third generation, and a healthier 
and fitter nation and race. This club, which I have had in the Chelms- 
ford High School since 1929, is, as far as is known, the only Senior 
Health Club in the state. Each fall the club sponsors a banquet in honor 
of the football squad ; and each spring they hold a party, the proceeds of 
which go to cheer up any member who might be sick. It is interesting 
to note that many of the former club members are now graduate nurses, 
while others are still training, or hoping to enter that profession. 

Pupils Schicked in May who were immunized in October, 1933 : 

Negative 345 

Positive 5 

350 

These five children who were positive in May were re-immunized in 
October, 1934 along with 221 teachers, pupils, and preschool children. Out 
of 1242 children in the elementary schools and 408 in High School, a 
very small percentage have not received the Toxin-Anti-Toxin. 

Thus far, the Department of Public Health has not conducted the 
annual follow-up clinic, but I expect that they will do so in the early 
part of the year. 

26 



Dr. Archibald from the Department of Public Health visited several 
times during the year and discussed health conditions in the schools and 
town. 

During July I took a very helpful and interesting course in school 
nursing at the Fitchburg State Teachers College; also, I attended several 
lectures given by the Department of Public Health. 

In closing may I express my sincere appreciation to you, Mr. Wright, 
for your guidance and help in the school health work; to the school 
physicians, Dr. Varney and Dr. Scoboria, to the teachers for loyalty and 
support; and to the various organizations for their conscientious service 
and deep interest in the health program. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MAE S. LEWIS, R. N., 

School Nurse. 
December 31, 1934. 



FINANCIAL SUMMARY 

An itemized statement of the expenditures of the School Committee is 
given in the report of the Town Accountant. 

EXPENDITURES 

Appropriation Budget 

for 1934, Proposed 

with Transfers Expended for 1935 

Administration $ 3,810.00 $ 3,800.75 $ 3,950.00 

Instruction 64,725.00 64,723.03 68,000.00 

Operation and Maintenance 17,250.00 17,240.45 17,875.00 

Auxiliary Agencies 10,415.00 10,404.98 11,350.00 

New Equipment 175.00 153.40 250.00 

Special for Toilets, Prince- 
ton St 1,700.00 1,700.00 



$98,075.00 $98,022.61 $101,425.00 

Other Expenditures for Educational Purposes, not 
on School Appropriation : 

Lowell Vocational School $ 2,291.45 

Insurance on Buildings 522.65 



Total for Educational Purposes $100,836.71 

RECEIPTS ON SCHOOL ACCOUNT 

From State, on teachers' salaries $ 19,100.00 

From State, tuition of state wards 3,096.41 

Tuition from other towns 728.42 

27 



From State, rebate on tuition paid Lowell Voca- 
tional School 

Total Receipts on School Account 

Net Cost to Town 



1,124.64 



$ 24,049.47 
$ 76,787.24 



SCHOOL CENSUS— October 1, 1934 



REGISTRATION OF MINORS: 5-7 yr. 

Boys 119 

Girls Ill 

Total 230 

DISTRIBUTION OF MINORS: 

In Public Schools 182 

In Vocational School — 

In Private Schools — 

Not in School 48 

Total 230 



-14 yr. 


14-16 yr. 


553 


160 


471 


149 



1024 

1004 

15 

5 

1024 



309 



287 

7 

2 

13 

309 



ENROLLMENT— October 1, 1934 

I II III IV V VI VII Vlll Tot. 

McFarlin 36 32 45 35 43 36 47 57 331 

East 25 17 29 24 20 15 16 21 167 

Highland Ave 11 13 16 16 17 17 14 22 126 

Princeton St 35 32 35 42 35 36 36 26 277 

Quessy 10 15 20 9 18 20 16 17 125 

South 9 8 5 8 9 14 53 

South Row 4 4 4 3 15 

Westlands 22 14 12 22 25 18 16 19 148 

Total 152 135 166 159 167 156 145 162 1242 

HIGH SCHOOL 

Freshmen 129 

Sophomores 120 

Juniors 80 

Seniors 79 

Total 408 

Total Enrollment 1650 



28 



ENROLLMENT FOR LAST TEN YEARS 



Elementary 

1925, October 30 1122 

1926, October 1 1166 

1927, October 1 1162 

1928, October 1 1148 

1929, October 1 1179 

1930, October 1 1182 

1931, October 1 1227 

1932, October 1 1258 

1933, October 1 1265 

1934, October 1 1242 



High 


Total 


194 


1316 


216 


1382 


224 


. 1386 


266 


1414 


306 


1485 


305 


1487 


345 


1572 


376 


1634 


382 


1647 


408 


1650 



GRADUATES OF EIGHTH GRADE 

North Chelmsford, June 13, 1934 
GEORGE R. QUESSY SCHOOL 



Howard Wesley Abrahamson 
Russell Beaulieu 
Shirley Irene Beaulieu 
Evelyn Mae Burton 
Kenneth Amos Cooke 



Margaret Drake 
Oliver Joseph Gervais 
Pearl Ophelia Gorton 
Theodore Harold Grant 
Paul Emile Lapointe 
John Leo Savage 



PRINCETON STREET SCHOOL 



William John Buchanan, Jr. 
Russell Sargent Butterfield 
Warren Carl Caton 
Muriel Adele Clark 
Phyllis Elizabeth Donaldson 
John Fantozzi 
Marguerite Elsie Ferron 
Joseph Francis Gaudette 
Lena Louise Genetti 
Adam Michael Jamros 
Hilda Vera Jenkinson 
Margaret Mary Kerrigan 
Winifred Theresa Lamb 
Vincent Frederick Lee 



Elia Locapo 

George Harry Marley 

Toffin Peter Narus 

Samuel Domian Panessiti 

Helen Jane Pomerleau 

Annie Ann Prowker 

Leo Bernard Rafferty 

Rita Ann Reno 

Carl Squeglia 

John Smith 

Ileen Rose Strobel 

Gertrude Janet Sullivan 

George Newton Swallow, Jr. 

Warren Burpee Wetmore 



Harriet Willis 



HIGHLAND AVENUE SCHOOL 
*Richard David Beauchemin Mary Bernadette Kinch 

Mildred Beaulieu James Joseph McEnnis 

Catherine Cecelia Cavanaugh John Mannix McGeown 

Edward Arthur Fallon Thomas Lincoln O'Donnell 

Edgar Henry Theriault 
* Deceased April 23, 1934. 



29 



GRADUATES OF EIGHTH GRADE 

Chelmsford Center, June 14, 1934 
McFARLIN SCHOOL 



Arthur Henry Bachelder 
William Edward Belleville 
Edwin Anthony Bettencourt 
Alfred Cresswell Burton 
Graham Murrey Cameron 
Frederick Henry Cann 
George Joseph Clarke 
Rae Durland Cornwall 
Helen Marion Cote 
Bernice Esther Donohue 
Mary Elizabeth Dows 
Dennis Ambrose Eaton 
Ronald Herbert Elliott 
Walter Edward Fletcher 
Anne Corinne Gorham 
Leon Graves 
Robert Winslow Gray 
Creighton Hamilton 
Thelma Evelyn Hansen 
Ruth Emma Harvey 
George Albert Flayden 
Ethna Patricia Hazeltine 
Richard Almoran Hines 
Grace Irma Hughes 
Roy Theodore Johnson 



Eva Frances Kelly 
Gerald Paul Kennedy 
Samuel Koulas 
Eugenia Clinton Linstad 
Edmund Joseph Loiselle 
Gordon Marshall 
Anthony Niemaszyk 
Mary Teresa Niemaszyk 
Julia Orgent 

Winnifred Margueritte Paignon 
Forrest Leslie Philbrook 
Raymond Eugene Pierce 
Arlene Mildred Russell 
Shirley Rae Sargent 
Cynthia Margaret Speed 
Antonio Sousa, Jr. 
Evelyn Sturtevant 
Dennis Joseph Sullivan 
Ruth Virginia Taintor 
LeRoy Clifford Thing 
Albertine Marie Tremblay 
James Meriden Whitmore 
Nathalie Bernice Wilder 
Ralph Irving Wood 
Richard Wyman 
Lewis Zaher 



WESTLANDS SCHOOL 



Katherine Harriet Cameron 
Edward Joseph Desaulnier, Jr. 
George Joseph Fitzpatrick 
Barbara Ellen Grant 
Miriam Hindman 
Margaret Dagmar Jensen 



Mildred Irene MacLaughlin 
Dorothy Isabella MacLean 
Virginia Marie Percival 
Phyllis Louise Stearns 
Vivien Elsie Todd 
Robert Alexander Wallace 



Stirling Richard Wallis 
EAST CHELMSFORD, June IS, 1934 



Robert Brown Burroughs 
John Thomas Coluchi 
John Edward Desmond 
Clifford Edward Firth 
Kathleen Patricia Graham 
Mary Theresa Graham 
Louise Irene Jones 
Doris Olive Leigh 
Rosa Espinola Mello 

Joseph 



Ruth Elizabeth Mosley 
Esther Helen Marie Ouimette 
Elizabeth Gladys Pereira 
Walter Merton Pihl 
Alice Alethea Purcell 
Barbara Elizabeth Scobie 
Rose Theresa Silva 
Seraphine Manuel Silva 
Manuel Francis Sousa 
Francis Vercontaire 



30 



GRADUATES OF HIGH SCHOOL 



June 20, 1934 



Albert Francis Andrews 
Mary Annie Angus 
Constance Averell 
Evelyn Agnethe Beckvold 
Phyllis Marjorie Berubee 
Thure Harold Bloomgren 
Olive Louise Bockes 
Ronald Roadman Boyd 
Helen Mildred Brotz 
Priscilla Wintie Burdick 
Frank Wilmer Stanley Byam 
Frank Arthur Burton 
Dorothy May Butters 
Donald Charles Calder 
Roger Thomas Calder 
Phyllis Capone 
Margaret Rita Christoun 
Blanche Evelyn Clough 
Blanche Viola Deputat 
George Richard Dixon 
Charles Francis Donaldson 
Robert Elliot Donaldson 
Raymond Gerard Ducharme 
Arthur Henry Durgin 
Myrtle Yvonne Ferron 
Paul Norman Finnegan 
Louise Ann Fitzpatrick 
Evelyn Louise Flemings 
Allen Grant Fletcher 
Edward Warren Freeman 
Emile Paul Gauthier 
Ruth A. Greene 
Milton Weldon Haire 
Marguerite Lee Hannaford 
Harold Raymond Hansen 
Evelyn Mavis Hayden 

Napoleon 



Albert Robert Hedlund 
S. Millicent Hill 
Rita Margaret Hines 
Virginia Frances Hines 
Ralph Ernest House 
W. Hersey Howard 
Ernest Janulis 
Anna Marie Judge 
Laurence Judge, Jr. 
Henry Arthur Loiselle 
Ellen Marie Lundstrom 
Helen Vivian MacNeill 
Roland Marcel McEnaney 
Alfred Francis McSheehy 
Julia Roberta Mikulis 
Bernice Arlene Mills 
Mary Elizabeth Miskell 
Claire Regis Molloy 
Joseph Patrick Mungovan 
Dorothy Elizabeth Murphy 
Barbara Jean Nath 
Catherine Niemaszyk 
Barbara Varetta Olsson 
Herbert Stanton Page 
Marie Dorothy Parks 
Helen Louise Pevey 
Marion Janet Plein 
Mildred Lauretta Purcell 
Barbara Louise Putnam 
Edith Mae Sargent 
Marie Lea Scobie 
Adaline Amelia Simpson 
Marjorie Viola Siade 
Louis Waite Stearns 
Helen Grace Stephens 
Monica Todd 
Joseph Valentine 



31 



INDEX 

Accountant's Report — Page 

Appropriations and Transfers 129 

Balance Sheet 135 

Cemetery Perpetual Care Funds 118 

Payments 104 

Payments of Interest 13(j 

Payments of Principal 129 

Receipts 100 

Trust Funds 1 \J 

Reports of — 

Agent of Board of Health 162 

Assessors 97 

Board of Fire Engineers 171 

Board of Health 161 

Cemetery Commissioners 169 

E. R. A 173 

Finance Commmittee 184 

Fish and Game Warden 161 

Forest Warden 170 

Inspector of Animals 166 

Inspector of Markets 166 

Inspector of Meat 165 

Inspector of Plumbing 167 

Inspector of Slaughtering 165 

Librarian Adams Library 154 

Middlesex County Extension Service 168 

Milk Inspector '. 164 

North Chelmsford Library Corporation 155 

Police Department 156 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 172 

State Audit 3 

Tax Collector 148 

Tax Collector of East Chelmsford Water District 152 

Tax Collector of North Chelmsford Fire District 151 

Town Treasurer 141 

Treasurer of Adams Library 153 

Trustees of Adams Library 153 

Town Clerk's Report — 

Births Recorded , 83 

Business Meeting, February 12, 1934 45 

Deaths Recorded 90 

Election of Officers 42 

Financial Report 96 

List of Jurors 94 

Marriages Recorded °° 

Meeting of Town Clerks of 11th Middlesex District 79 

Officers Elected and Appointed 30 



Primary Election 55 

Special Town Meeting, June 29, 1934 00 

Special Town Meeting, December 4, 1934 82 

State Primaries, September 20, 1934 64 

State Election, November 6, 1934 74 

Vital Statistics 83 

Warrant for Annual Town Meeting, 1934 36 

Warrant for Party Primary ^ 53 

Warrant for Special Town Meeting, June 29, 1934 58 

Warrant for State Primary 62 

Warrant for State Election 71 

Warrant for Special Town Meeting, December 4, 1934 80 

Warrant for Annual Town Meeting, 1935 178 



INDEX OF SCHOOL REPORT 

Enrollment by Grades, Fall Term, 1934 28 

Graduates of High School, 1934 31 

Graduates of Eighth Grade, 1934 29 

Reports of : 

Enrollment for Last 10 Years 29 

Financial Summary 27 

High School Funds .' 21 

High School Principal 19 

School Census 28 

School Committee 5 

School Nurse 24 

Superintendent 10 

Supervisor of Music 23 

School Calendar 2 

School Officials 2 

Signal for No School 2 

Teachers 3 



MEMORANDUM